Wood vs. Stainless Steel vs. Regular Steel - STANDS

Discussion in 'General Equipment, Hardware, Filtration' started by Finatik, Mar 7, 2018.

  1. drtrash

    drtrash Well-Known Member

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    8020 with wood wrap/ doors, stronger than wood resists rust easy to assemble can make longer or shorter so maybe last stand you buy
     
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  2. jose hernandez

    jose hernandez Active Member

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    Finished product need 2 touch s couple of things

    0D6E4955-41CC-439A-AA9B-B7D2C768B644.jpeg

    32DB6A1B-183D-402A-B4A5-CC152AF66B2F.jpeg
     
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  3. mrpizzaface

    mrpizzaface Active Member R2R Supporter

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    I would consider a steel stand if I was doing a really large tank and wanted a clear span underneath. With that being said, I am putting a 160 on my first floor and the stand will be wood. I agree with @Greybeard the cost of steel is often the same or less than wood. I would not be worried about corrosion on powder coated steel. 80/20 is cool, but pricey. stainless is just not necessary.
     
  4. jda

    jda Valuable Member

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    Even regular carbon steel will not rust enough to get degraded to a point of failure in our lifetime if the welds are correct. A simple coating of rust inhibiting paint will do the job for a decade (that is as long as I have had some). Powder coating is probably even better.
     
  5. drtrash

    drtrash Well-Known Member

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    Sweet triton sump, what skimmer did you wedge in?
     
  6. jose hernandez

    jose hernandez Active Member

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    reef octopus sss150 bought it from premium aqautics great skimmer dc controllable has a float switch on the collection cup its a beast
     
  7. jose hernandez

    jose hernandez Active Member

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    thnks for the comment 120 is a work in progress still deciding on a retyrn pump wanted a vectra l1 but alot of bad reviews also alot of members r sellin their replacements from ecotech signs of buyer beware
     
  8. jt17

    jt17 Valuable Member Partner Member 2018

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    I'm a wood fan for stands primarily because it's easier to mount to after construction. Any of these materials can be protected to last. My last tank stand I used 3/4 oak. This stand can hold twice the weight it carries and this design maximizes the space beneath.

    IMG_3955.jpeg

    I worked with my LFS on my current tank and they recommended wood. They have powder coated steel stands in their shop that are 3 years old that are already rusting and one stand has an issue with the feet failing. If you do go the steel route make sure to request at least 8 feet. All of the force of tank water and stand rest upon the feet. That's a lot of force for 4-6 points.
    Last year at RAP orlando there was a vendor selling 80 20 for stands. While it's more expensive, it has so much potential. I like how it can be easily modified after construction.
     
  9. Finatik

    Finatik FINatik about my Tanks ! R2R Supporter Build Thread Contributor

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    Niiiiice !!!
     
  10. LadyMac

    LadyMac Well-Known Member Build Thread Contributor

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    That’s beautiful! Is it set up yet? Would love to see a photo of it all together with the tank running.
     
  11. drtrash

    drtrash Well-Known Member

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    What is the drop in dimension of skimmer section (looking down)? Wondering what the foot print of skimmer has to be to fit. They only give bottom area. My bk skimmer is 7" square on bottom so will need that to use synergy triton, look forward to start up
     
  12. siggy

    siggy Which way do I go R2R Supporter R2R Excellence Award Partner Member 2018 Build Thread Contributor

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    Well it sounds like whatever you decide CAN be as NICE, STRONG, & LASTING as you choose to make it, I was leaning towards power coated steel then @jt17 reminded us all of the natural beauty of Wood and FINE furniture
    I think I am more conflicted than you..Good Luck on the build!
     
  13. drtrash

    drtrash Well-Known Member

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    What is diameter of pipe in fuge? Not sure when they say1.5" bulkhead, is that size of pipe that goes in and out, you look like you are reducing it
     
  14. Finatik

    Finatik FINatik about my Tanks ! R2R Supporter Build Thread Contributor

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    If I go with a metal stand, I will put a nice wood cover around it so that it looks like fine furniture.
     
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  15. jda

    jda Valuable Member

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    ...on magnets so that you can take it all off for maintenance or to plumb new stuff. You can also take it off after years of slight salt staining to refinish and stuff.
     
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  16. Richard

    Richard Member R2R Supporter

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    If you decide to go with S/S you will need to get type 316 s/s as it has a higher nickel content with the addition of 2-3% molybdenum which will give you much better corrosion resistance with saltwater.
     
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  17. Greybeard

    Greybeard Valuable Member R2R Supporter Reef Squad R2R Excellence Award Build Thread Contributor

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    Beautiful. Yes, well built, solid wood, or even cabinet grade ply, with solid wood as required, can make for a very nice stand. Strong, far more open inside than the more common skinned dimensional lumber frame methods, and with the right finish choices, impervious to salt and water for many years. If that entire carcass is 3/4" solid oak, and you paid half as much attention to construction techniques as you obviously have with decorative elements, you should be able to will that cabinet to your grandchildren. Nice work.

    IMHO, a steel structure, with a beautiful, non structural decorative surround, can be equally attractive, at least as strong, last as long, and end up being less expensive. The price of good wood is just nuts these days.
     
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  18. clsanchez77

    clsanchez77 Active Member Louisiana Reef Club

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    I have built several stands over the years and there is absolutely nothing wrong with wood. Its always my go to choice. It is economical and will last many years, even with salt, water, saltwater, etc. Wood does need a good protective coating however and you do not want to use steel fasteners for load transfer. I only use glue on mine. It is the easiest material for DIY for a hobbyists and the most forgiving for mistakes. I do my tanks to last about 10 years and never had an issue.

    Now MDF is totally useless and I would only use this on temporary tanks such as QT setups.

    On my next tank, I plan to use T-slotted aluminum. This is much more expensive than wood. The reason for the change is so that I can do something different next time. Also, having aluminum legs will allow for smaller sections, giving me more free space under the tank. I saw someone else mentioned this with a wood wrap. If I did this, I would go for a more contemporary look and use wood inserts instead.

    Welded steel or welded aluminum just is not necessary...unless you are doing something drastically different, or you are good at and enjoy welding. You do need to have more precision. Powered coating is the only way to go for long term protection. Enamel or epoxy coatings (only if properly primes) will give you many years. Most tanks are only up 3-5 years anyway as many of us often quit, move or upgrade.

    I spec stainless steel for a lot of products at work, but I believe it is absolute way overkill for home use. Unless your steel is in the water and in direct contact with the air/water interface, it just is not needed.

    Here is my current one, the cabinet is all hand built from 3/4" birch base frame and 3/4" cherry detail, trim and doors. The picture is two years old, back when the tank was still relatively new and lightly stocked.

    IMG_2313.jpg
     
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  19. Deaf clown

    Deaf clown Active Member Build Thread Contributor

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    I plan on doing an aluminum stand for a 6’x2’x3’ dimension. I’ve got a buddy I work with who has welded aluminum and prefers that over steel. Best part is he said he’d do it at cost.
     
  20. Reefer Reboot

    Reefer Reboot Member

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    Just FYI, if designed properly, T-slot aluminum can make great stands. I use the stuff at work and am surprised at how much it is capable of holding. What I like about them is the ability to add on extra supports or take them away whenever you want. I've made a frame work for my Apex on back and rearranged it a few times as I've added more modules to it. I made "cabinet" faces for it that attach with magnets for easy removal and access. (Sorry, they're not in the picture.) Top tank is 130ish gallons and the bottom sump is 120ish gallons. Cost wise it was fairly comparable to other options I looked at. It's over a year old and I've splashed lots of water on it. Still i can find no corrosion on it. A lot of the manufacturers will work with you to help design it. Just my two cents worth of experience. 20180308_184747.jpg
     
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