Yellow banded possum wrasse in a 10 gallon - who has done it?

TSM Aquatics

SauceyReef

Active Member
View Badges
Joined
Mar 23, 2021
Messages
284
Reaction score
274
Location
Akron, Ohio
I am wondering if anyone here has had experience with Yellow banded possum wrasse in a 10 gallon or smaller.

How is it going / did it go? Do you feel it was adequate space for this fish? Long term? Was the fish swimming up against the glass often?


I have a Fluval 13.5 Gallon. My LFS has a Yellow banded possum and I know it is the larger of the 3 possum wrasse. I want to make sure it will be FINE In my 13.5 gallon though (probably 10-12 gallons in display) if not I will happily wait for a pink streaked or Tanaka.
 
Corals.com
OP
SauceyReef

SauceyReef

Active Member
View Badges
Joined
Mar 23, 2021
Messages
284
Reaction score
274
Location
Akron, Ohio
In my tank yes I do. I have a tailspot blenny, clown goby, clownfish, and Yasha Goby. I assumed it would be okay because all these fish are super docile fish in general and pretty good with each other. The only 2 competing for space will be the tailspot and possum. The clownfish chills in the Duncan coral all day, the Yasha Goby stays in its burrow most of the time, and the clown goby is like CM's in size.
 
OP
SauceyReef

SauceyReef

Active Member
View Badges
Joined
Mar 23, 2021
Messages
284
Reaction score
274
Location
Akron, Ohio
I had one in a 7-gallon all-in-one, and he was very docile; seemed to have plenty of swim room. I had a hard time convincing him to eat, however, and he didn’t make ifT all that long.
Ahh that is really sad - I am sorry to hear that. Could it have possibly been from not enough microorganisms to eat from the small tank? From what I am learning after trying to find these fish for 6 months - they only get them from the wild during certain seasons. Some wild ones definitely are harder to acclimate to the tank life and frozen foods.
 
Champion Lighting & Supply

Lasse

7500 Club Member
View Badges
Joined
Mar 20, 2016
Messages
8,079
Reaction score
23,658
Location
Källarliden 14 D Bohus, Sweden
Since around 10 years - i always have a possum wrasse in my aquariums. But they have been between 110 and 80 G. They are small but very active swimmers and need to swim around. IMO - 10 G is very much to small for a yellow banded possum wrasse, They are also very shy

This is my present example and it has been with me for nearly 5 years at the moment


Sincerely Lasse
 
OP
SauceyReef

SauceyReef

Active Member
View Badges
Joined
Mar 23, 2021
Messages
284
Reaction score
274
Location
Akron, Ohio
Since around 10 years - i always have a possum wrasse in my aquariums. But they have been between 110 and 80 G. They are small but very active swimmers and need to swim around. IMO - 10 G is very much to small for a yellow banded possum wrasse, They are also very shy

This is my present example and it has been with me for nearly 5 years at the moment


Sincerely Lasse
Awesome video! And appreciate your opinion and concern. Have you only had a yellow banded possum? How large is it now? These are such cool fish! I think I am going to get one and if the tank starts looking to small upgrade to a 15-25 gallon long. The LFS has one around 1.5" which should give me some time!
 
Orphek OR3 reef aquarium LED lighting
OP
SauceyReef

SauceyReef

Active Member
View Badges
Joined
Mar 23, 2021
Messages
284
Reaction score
274
Location
Akron, Ohio
Its still around that size. i have had all of the species - this one seems to be more adapted to captivity.

Sincerely Lasse
When you say this one - you mean specifically the possum wrasses or just the yellow banded? I was thinking a Tanaka or pink streaked would be better than a yellow banded because they stay a bit smaller .
 
OP
SauceyReef

SauceyReef

Active Member
View Badges
Joined
Mar 23, 2021
Messages
284
Reaction score
274
Location
Akron, Ohio
The yellow banded have stay alive longer in my aquariums compared with the other two. It could be individual but it seems that the yellow banded can adopt better - IMO

Sincerely Lasse
This is putting me in a bit of an awkward position because I assumed the pink streaked and tanaka would be better candidates as they stay smaller. They are all from the Wild and the tanaka/yellow banded are near the exact same species, so maybe you just had particular personalities? Curious - how many of each fish have you had before?

Appreciate your info even if it is causing me some dissonance haha.
 

minus9

2500 Club Member
View Badges
Marketplace Rating
Joined
Feb 13, 2017
Messages
2,949
Reaction score
3,390
Location
Los Angeles (SFV)
They should really be in something larger, I would say 20g to 30g with lots of live rock to source food. They will take prepared foods, but spend their time actively hunting for food. They're not like mandarins, but I kinda treat them in that way. They'll thrive in larger tanks, but could adapt to small, nano sized tanks given that there's no competition for food. My Tanaka was kept in my 22g for nearly 3 years before I upgraded, but I had real ocean rock in that tank and he didn't have any competition for food. I think you need to ask yourself the hard question, do you want it to survive or thrive?
Like Lasse, I will always have a Wetmorella in my tank, they are simply one of the most intriguing fish to watch. My advice is to wait until you have a larger tank and get to watch them thrive, it really makes the difference in their behavior.
After losing my Tanaka of old age, I just recently picked up a YB. Within the first hour, he was out and about swimming with the big boys.
0A974F9E-63B6-4747-A7B8-A78F2B01F952.jpeg
 
OP
SauceyReef

SauceyReef

Active Member
View Badges
Joined
Mar 23, 2021
Messages
284
Reaction score
274
Location
Akron, Ohio
They should really be in something larger, I would say 20g to 30g with lots of live rock to source food. They will take prepared foods, but spend their time actively hunting for food. They're not like mandarins, but I kinda treat them in that way. They'll thrive in larger tanks, but could adapt to small, nano sized tanks given that there's no competition for food. My Tanaka was kept in my 22g for nearly 3 years before I upgraded, but I had real ocean rock in that tank and he didn't have any competition for food. I think you need to ask yourself the hard question, do you want it to survive or thrive?
Like Lasse, I will always have a Wetmorella in my tank, they are simply one of the most intriguing fish to watch. My advice is to wait until you have a larger tank and get to watch them thrive, it really makes the difference in their behavior.
After losing my Tanaka of old age, I just recently picked up a YB. Within the first hour, he was out and about swimming with the big boys.
0A974F9E-63B6-4747-A7B8-A78F2B01F952.jpeg
I have a 13.5 peninsula with lots of established liverock, fuge, and I add pods on a regular basis. Only fish competing for live fauana would be the clown goby which again is like 2cms in size so in this case my tank is FILLED with pods and flora/fauan. Plus in around 6 months I plan on upgrading so I think the fish will have a very happy life with me!
 

Lasse

7500 Club Member
View Badges
Joined
Mar 20, 2016
Messages
8,079
Reaction score
23,658
Location
Källarliden 14 D Bohus, Sweden
Here is the different species in the family


From that article

1622818867087.png

There is a larger wrasse there the youngster can be mistaken for W.albofasciata - Epibulus insidiator

Wetmorella species are known for their shy behavior and can easily be stressed not to thrive. However - if I should recommend any to someone that not have had them befor - it will be the yellow banded. It has for me been the harder species. During the years I have had 10 + individuals of different species - the last one have been in the aquarium for more than 4 years now.

I can only try to give you my experiences of the genera - you must be the one that decide. But if you buying this fish from your LFS - please be sure it eats first. I feed my fish with only frozen food like artemia, mysidae, copepods and so on.

Sincerely Lasse
 
OP
SauceyReef

SauceyReef

Active Member
View Badges
Joined
Mar 23, 2021
Messages
284
Reaction score
274
Location
Akron, Ohio
Here is the different species in the family


From that article

1622818867087.png

There is a larger wrasse there the youngster can be mistaken for W.albofasciata - Epibulus insidiator

Wetmorella species are known for their shy behavior and can easily be stressed not to thrive. However - if I should recommend any to someone that not have had them befor - it will be the yellow banded. It has for me been the harder species. During the years I have had 10 + individuals of different species - the last one have been in the aquarium for more than 4 years now.

I can only try to give you my experiences of the genera - you must be the one that decide. But if you buying this fish from your LFS - please be sure it eats first. I feed my fish with only frozen food like artemia, mysidae, copepods and so on.

Sincerely LasseI
I appreciate your information and experiences greatly and will use this to weigh in on my decision on which species! Still at a bit of a crossroads though because the yellow banded is the least desirable to me other than the fact that you are saying it does better than the others (which I am definitely adding as a solid factor with your vast experience). You do mean "hardier" not "harder" correct - just want to be sure? Oh and if I get a fish I will always make sure it eats - you are correct this is very important! Did any of the Tanakas or pink streaked make it long term for you? 10 possum wrasse is quite a lot! Remember what the majority of the species were? What led to the demise of the majority? Did they eat frozen? Love to hear stories.


I have one in my 120 and even that seems a little small IMO. Can't wait to watch mine in the new 260 peninsula.

They are extremely active and hunting 24/7. I can't imagine a 10g housing enough natural food for one.
Honestly I am just going to negate your advice here. These fish are known to do fine in 15-25 gallon aquariums and most testimonials and information online supports this. With your logic you would want my clown goby in a 100 gallon minimum..


Again my post was asking for experiences with these fish in a 10 gallon or lower. If you have not ever had a nano or let alone a possum in a nano please take it easy on advice.. Also remember I have a established 13.5 peninsula with a fuge and plan on upgrading in the next 6 months to a larger tank.
 

rtparty

Valuable Member
View Badges
Joined
Jan 19, 2010
Messages
1,208
Reaction score
1,478
Location
Utah
I appreciate your information and experiences greatly and will use this to weigh in on my decision on which species! Still at a bit of a crossroads though because the yellow banded is the least desirable to me other than the fact that you are saying it does better than the others. You do mean "hardier" not "harder" correct - just want to be sure? Oh and if I get a fish I will always make sure it eats - you are correct this is very important! Did any of the Tanakas or pink streaked make it long term for you? 10 possum wrasse is quite a lot! Remember what the majority of the species were? What led to the demise of the majority? Did they eat frozen? Love to hear stories.



Honestly I am just going to negate your advice here. These fish are known to do fine in 15-25 gallon aquariums and most testimonials and information online supports this. With your logic you would want my clown goby in a 100 gallon minimum..


Again my post was asking for experiences with these fish in a 10 gallon or lower. If you have not ever had a nano or let alone a possum in a nano please take it easy on advice.. Also remember I have a established 13.5 peninsula with a fuge and plan on upgrading in the next 6 months to a larger tank.

Do clown gobies ACTIVELY swim and hunt ALL DAY LONG??? No, they don't.

I have been in this hobby since 2005. I was keeping nano tanks before they were cool. I ran a pair of 24g JBJ Nano Cubes for over 6 years. I kept a 7.5g cube for close to 2 years and tried a sixline wrasse in it. A fish that is VERY similar to a possum wrasse. It did okay but I couldn't feed enough and keep water in check and it didn't have nearly enough natural food to hunt.

I think you are underestimating how much natural food these fish eat. They eat 1000s of pods every single day. My possum is a fatty and doesn't eat that much of what I feed.

You are welcome to negate my advice all you would like. Doesn't mean my advice is wrong or bad. I wouldn't dream of putting a possum wrasse in a nano tank personally. Your mind was already made up, so why ask?
 
OP
SauceyReef

SauceyReef

Active Member
View Badges
Joined
Mar 23, 2021
Messages
284
Reaction score
274
Location
Akron, Ohio
Do clown gobies ACTIVELY swim and hunt ALL DAY LONG??? No, they don't.

I have been in this hobby since 2005. I was keeping nano tanks before they were cool. I ran a pair of 24g JBJ Nano Cubes for over 6 years. I kept a 7.5g cube for close to 2 years and tried a sixline wrasse in it. A fish that is VERY similar to a possum wrasse. It did okay but I couldn't feed enough and keep water in check and it didn't have nearly enough natural food to hunt.

I think you are underestimating how much natural food these fish eat. They eat 1000s of pods every single day. My possum is a fatty and doesn't eat that much of what I feed.

You are welcome to negate my advice all you would like. Doesn't mean my advice is wrong or bad. I wouldn't dream of putting a possum wrasse in a nano tank personally. Your mind was already made up, so why ask?
You are making big assumptions on certain matters without having the knowledge or experience and I can testify from my own tank livestock. Yes my green clown gobies actively swims and hunts all day long (well maybe not all day because the green clown goby I have is clearly half nocturnal or "diurnal"). It is so small though it is doing 0 dent in the pod population. I also add cultured pods.

I am not going to quote my reefing experience but I am not some beginner trying to shove a mandarin in a 10 gallon. I understand you have done this a long time, but I think your statement that a 120 gallon is not large enough is just jaded. I asked to hear personal experience so I know what I am getting myself into and can notice any early stress signs before the tank transition after I move locations. If I have too I can jump the gun and make the transition earlier. I already have all the supplies.
 
Top Shelf Aquatics
TSM Aquatics

Have you ever had a reef tank with no sump and how did it go?

  • YES and it was just fine

    Votes: 356 58.7%
  • YES but it was difficult

    Votes: 105 17.3%
  • NO

    Votes: 134 22.1%
  • Other (please explain)

    Votes: 11 1.8%
AF
Top