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link81

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I'm with you... seems fishy. This seems like an attempted fix due to a quality/design issue. A ballast should not trip a GFCI. They do generate high voltages but if it is works properly it should not allow current to flow to ground. They may be right on the edge for electrical insulation where it leaks more than 5mA but less than 15mA in which case their recommendation would work.

Not a fan....

this was my exact thought.
 

link81

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generally speaking, yes, you are more efficient to step up a size and slow the pump down. It also improves longevity of parts because they're not being run at max speed.

Very basic pump efficiency curve. Yes you can go too big.
3-s2.0-B9780857090775500074-f07-01-9780857090775.gif


 

louti

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I apologize if this question has been asked. I did not go through this whole thread. I currently have a standard outlet where my tank will be set up and am going to change it out for a GFCI. I would really like to have 2 GFCI's so I can at least keep my powerhead and main pump separated so they wouldn't both shut off at the same time. Can I wire multiple GFCI's without running an additional circuit? How would I wire this up? Also, will a power strip plugged into a GFCI protect all the equipment plugged into the strip?
 

Brew12

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I apologize if this question has been asked. I did not go through this whole thread. I currently have a standard outlet where my tank will be set up and am going to change it out for a GFCI. I would really like to have 2 GFCI's so I can at least keep my powerhead and main pump separated so they wouldn't both shut off at the same time. Can I wire multiple GFCI's without running an additional circuit? How would I wire this up? Also, will a power strip plugged into a GFCI protect all the equipment plugged into the strip?
Sorry I missed this, but I am not aware of any 2 outlet receptacles where they can operate independently. If you jumper power from the input to the GFCI receptacle to a new and adjacent GFCI receptacle, they will function independent of each other. Much easier than running a new circuit.
And yes, everything on the power strip would be protected if it is plugged into a GFCI.
 

-Aquaman-

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Could an electrician please message. I have some questions I'd rather talk about in private. Sorry if that sounds weird it's just for personal reasons. Thank you
 

Super Fly

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Recently bought a used less than 1 yr old skimmer (BM Curve 5). It was plugged into a Belkin Surgemaster powerstrip (has surge suppressor) with power on/off button while cleaning the skimmer. The powerstrip is located next to swab sink, few recepticles away from tank. Every time I turned that power strip off with only the BM skimmer plugged into it, it tripped my GFCI that powers the tank. I've been using the same powerstrip to make salt water (powerhead, heater, & pump) w/o any issues in past turning it on/off. Any idea why the new skimmer is causing the GFCI to trip?

Edit - would it be possible the powerstrip has just coincidently gone bad?... gonna test this tonight by plugging the skimmer directly to recepticle.
 
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Brew12

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Recently bought a used less than 1 yr old skimmer (BM Curve 5). It was plugged into a Belkin Surgemaster powerstrip (has surge suppressor) with power on/off button while cleaning the skimmer. The powerstrip is located next to swab sink, few recepticles away from tank. Every time I turned that power strip off with only the BM skimmer plugged into it, it tripped my GFCI that powers the tank. I've been using the same powerstrip to make salt water (powerhead, heater, & pump) w/o any issues in past turning it on/off. Any idea why the new skimmer is causing the GFCI to trip?

Edit - would it be possible the powerstrip has just coincidently gone bad?... gonna test this tonight by plugging the skimmer directly to recepticle.
I would expect that to be the case. Sounds like the arc being drawn when power is interrupted is shooting to ground just enough to trip the GFCI.

Edit: And it's likely that the powerstrip didn't just go bad, it's probably been in this condition for awhile. The extra inductive load of a motor can cause a larger arc making it easier to go to ground. So adding the skimmer was the trigger for the problematic switch.
 

Super Fly

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I would expect that to be the case. Sounds like the arc being drawn when power is interrupted is shooting to ground just enough to trip the GFCI.

Edit: And it's likely that the powerstrip didn't just go bad, it's probably been in this condition for awhile. The extra inductive load of a motor can cause a larger arc making it easier to go to ground. So adding the skimmer was the trigger for the problematic switch.
Just tested skimmer alone n it didnt trip the GFCI so definitely was the power strip. Thx for response, just very glad I didnt buy a defective skimmer. :p:D
 

OutLawX77

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After 25 years experiance on the field and 15 years at the office, as an electrican I think I can answer most of your questions.

Thanks to my fellow electricians for helping answering your question's.
And the team is:

Myself and
anemonekeeper




:wink:
Hello YF
I,m new and still learning this system and just found this thread,
so the link I just posted above is a question on just this very subject of eleritical.
If you could be so kind as to read it and let me know if this would to solve this problem IM having Thanks
 

Brew12

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Hello YF
I,m new and still learning this system and just found this thread,
so the link I just posted above is a question on just this very subject of eleritical.
If you could be so kind as to read it and let me know if this would to solve this problem IM having Thanks
Just so you are aware, this member hasn't been active in over 6 years. This post is from 2012. Sorry!
 

khirmun

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Question: Are all the controllers such as Apex or Reefbrites are 120VAC? If yes is there anyway to use 220VAC devices on them? How would one go about using those if there power outlets are 220VAC?
 

block134

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I was wondering if there is a way to tell how many amps I have coming into my house just by looking at the power line going into the service panel.

The panel in my house is 150 amps but when I reached out to my electricity provider they said they dont keep records of what line is going to the house. They also said they normally only install 100 amp or 200 lines but my panel is 150 amps.
 

Paul B

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If the "Main Breaker" reads 150 amps, thats how much power you can draw from the utility. Not what it reads on the panel door, look at the big breaker itself. It is probably the top breaker and it will read 100, 125 or 150.

Your entire house probably only uses 20 amps or so unless you have electric heat, central air or stove. But you can use up to whatever it reads on the main breaker.

Don't worry about the size of the wires coming into your house because the power company sometimes uses smaller wires that we are allowed to use (depending on how the power is coming in, (Pipe, Romex etc.)

(Master electrician 50 years)
 
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alton

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Look at the transformer pot on the pole? 15 KW is normally used for 100 amp services and 25 KW is used for 200 amp. Also your electric bill normally has how many kilowatt hours used each month. So you can divide that by how many days/hours to see what you are actually drawing. One utility company by me ties two 200 amp services feeding two homes on a 25 KW transformer, because they know those homes will never go over 100 amps.
 

block134

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I am planning on upgrading my service to 200 amps so I was wondering what I had. The part that comfusesd me I guess is I have 150 amp panel but the electric company says they only install 100 and 200 amp service lines. So would that mean I have a 200 amp service line? Or do I really have a 150 service line?

The main breaker is 150 amps
 

Brew12

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I am planning on upgrading my service to 200 amps so I was wondering what I had. The part that comfusesd me I guess is I have 150 amp panel but the electric company says they only install 100 and 200 amp service lines. So would that mean I have a 200 amp service line? Or do I really have a 150 service line?

The main breaker is 150 amps
People normally upgrade to a 200A panel to get more breaker space, not because they intend to increase load above 150A.
Your utility may only have 2 standard wire sizes they use on installations to reduce the number of cables they need to keep on hand.
And, as @Paul B said, your utility is allowed to use a cable rated for 100A to feed a 200A panel. Cables have a 5 minute and 2 hour overload rating. It would be almost unheard of for a reasonable sized house to pull more than 100A for over 2 hours.
 

block134

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People normally upgrade to a 200A panel to get more breaker space, not because they intend to increase load above 150A.
Your utility may only have 2 standard wire sizes they use on installations to reduce the number of cables they need to keep on hand.
And, as @Paul B said, your utility is allowed to use a cable rated for 100A to feed a 200A panel. Cables have a 5 minute and 2 hour overload rating. It would be almost unheard of for a reasonable sized house to pull more than 100A for over 2 hours.
That makes sense explained like that.

The main reason why I was planning on doing the upgrade is for more space.
 

Paul B

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It means you have a 150 amp service. No more. They make those boxes for 200 amps but it is the breaker that determines how much power you can use.

The utility company probably did not install wires for 200 amps as copper wire is very expensive and most homes will never use over 50 amps. Unless Like I said, electric heat, stove etc.

Why do you want 200 amps? The utility company will not give it to you unless you have a specific need as it may affect the service lines on your block.
 
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