Can somebody id any of these

zeszes

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Firstly, my new pipe organ frag has these strange white things between the Skeleton, no clue what they could be. 20231130_204923.jpg

Next is this weird little Grey thing on my new tubastrea
20231130_205010.jpg

And finally, i got a dendronepthya from my lfs's display sump, (he was just gonna toss it), so he gave it to me,
It came with a single clove polyp that didn't last more than a week, but also came with 2 of these
20231117_194839.jpg
20231124_210029.jpg

Here it is under blues and under whites without its feeders out, it's definitely a stony coral about 1cm in height, and the feeders are always out. I had to poke it with a rod to get the skeleton only picture. I've yet to see propagation in the month I've had it.
My best guess it northern star polyp but that's a shot in the dark at best.

20231130_204923.jpg 20231130_205010.jpg 20231117_194839.jpg 20231124_210040.jpg
 

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Firstly, my new pipe organ frag has these strange white things between the Skeleton, no clue what they could be. 20231130_204923.jpg

Next is this weird little Grey thing on my new tubastrea
20231130_205010.jpg

And finally, i got a dendronepthya from my lfs's display sump, (he was just gonna toss it), so he gave it to me,
It came with a single clove polyp that didn't last more than a week, but also came with 2 of these
20231117_194839.jpg
20231124_210029.jpg

Here it is under blues and under whites without its feeders out, it's definitely a stony coral about 1cm in height, and the feeders are always out. I had to poke it with a rod to get the skeleton only picture. I've yet to see propagation in the month I've had it.
My best guess it northern star polyp but that's a shot in the dark at best.

20231130_204923.jpg 20231130_205010.jpg 20231117_194839.jpg 20231124_210040.jpg
Last two pics look like maybe Strawberry Anemone or Ball Anemones.
 
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zeszes

zeszes

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I'll be the first to admit, I know next to nothing about sponges other than not to take them out of the water, any idea on what they may be specifically?
Third is probably a Hidden Cup Coral, Phyllangia americana.
I really was hoping it was phyllangia Americana,I collect nps including weird ones like that, I've been trying to get my hands on that for quite a while but I'm yet to find any, they're definitely really small for that though.
Second one is probably spionid worms (hopefully not a coral-boring species), but the super long tentacle next to it is throwing me.
How can I deal with it if it is?
 

ISpeakForTheSeas

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I'll be the first to admit, I know next to nothing about sponges other than not to take them out of the water, any idea on what they may be specifically?
The air exposure thing may be species specific or just a myth altogether like exposing starfish to air (they can be exposed to air for short periods, just not for so long that they start to dry out). That said, I'm not sure on the species (sponge ID can be incredibly difficult, with some sponges needing a microscope or DNA test to be ID'ed), but it doesn't seem to be bothering the coral at all chemically, so it's almost certainly harmless/beneficial. Basically as long as it doesn't grow over the polyps and smother the coral, it's a harmless filter feeder.

Completely seriously, it's most likely harmless/beneficial (though sponges on coral skeletons understandably make a lot of people nervous). Very few sponges cause any issues, and most of the ones that do are just invasive (growing like a weed), not actually harmful in any way. With the invasive ones that aren't harmful, some will grow all around and up the stalk of a coral (looking like they might smother it) only to stop at the top of the stalk with harming the coral/polyps at all.
I really was hoping it was phyllangia Americana,I collect nps including weird ones like that, I've been trying to get my hands on that for quite a while but I'm yet to find any, they're definitely really small for that though.
Yeah, coral ID isn't my strong point yet, but these corals are pretty distinctive - if you want to be sure, you can double check with someone like @encrustingacro who's a lot better with corals than I am at present.
How can I deal with it if it is?
I lost kind of checked out at some point in the threads below, but I believe Ivermectin and possibly Interceptor are the current treatment options for infestations (these are not options that should be used lightly, so I'd really suggest making sure Coral-boring Spionid Worms are what you've got and reading through the threads below before deciding if you're going to try and get rid of them):
 
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The air exposure thing may be species specific or just a myth altogether like exposing starfish to air (they can be exposed to air for short periods, just not for so long that they start to dry out). That said, I'm not sure on the species (sponge ID can be incredibly difficult, with some sponges needing a microscope or DNA test to be ID'ed), but it doesn't seem to be bothering the coral at all chemically, so it's almost certainly harmless/beneficial. Basically as long as it doesn't grow over the polyps and smother the coral, it's a harmless filter feeder.

Completely seriously, it's most likely harmless/beneficial (though sponges on coral skeletons understandably make a lot of people nervous). Very few sponges cause any issues, and most of the ones that do are just invasive (growing like a weed), not actually harmful in any way. With the invasive ones that aren't harmful, some will grow all around and up the stalk of a coral (looking like they might smother it) only to stop at the top of the stalk with harming the coral/polyps at all.

Yeah, coral ID isn't my strong point yet, but these corals are pretty distinctive - if you want to be sure, you can double check with someone like @encrustingacro who's a lot better with corals than I am at present.

I lost kind of checked out at some point in the threads below, but I believe Ivermectin and possibly Interceptor are the current treatment options for infestations (these are not options that should be used lightly, so I'd really suggest making sure Coral-boring Spionid Worms are what you've got and reading through the threads below before deciding if you're going to try and get rid of them):
Wow, thank you so much, looks like I've got some reading ahead of me

At some point I might try to bust out my nice Camera and try to get some macro photos of both of these to get some better photos of both of them
 

encrustingacro

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Yeah, coral ID isn't my strong point yet, but these corals are pretty distinctive - if you want to be sure, you can double check with someone like @encrustingacro who's a lot better with corals than I am at present.
To be honest, I’m not really knowledgeable with azooxanthellate corals. @zeszes If you really want to know, you could probably find a way to contact Joe Rowlett and ask him.
 
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for anybody curious, I decided to take a few new pictures with the macro lens if anybody wants to take another guess at some of these, upon close inspection, I don't think the things between the pipe organ was a sponge, it looks almost more like eggs of some sort, and I have a new ID request

First off is the mystery stony coral, still no idea what it is, but he was happily feeding today, I think I'm gonna keep him and name him Fred, I also intend to try and reach out to Joe Rowlett and see if he has any ideas,
I have a few higher-res pictures that might help him that are a little too big of files for the fourm here
Untitled-2.jpg


Next up is the worm,
@ISpeakForTheSeas You're definitely right on this one
He was moving a lot so I couldn't really get any good shots, best I could get was this kinda blurry one, but just seeing him through the camera and how I filled his hole with glue, he immediately poked out right next to it, tells me, he's a coral boring species, from what I was reading, there's been some success with ivermectin as a dip, so I'm gonna give that a try.
This is a new frag and it seems the RX dip just didn't catch him, it also seems like he's the only one so I'm just gonna pop the frag off today, re-treat it in ivermectin and put it right back where it's living right now before he has a chance to stunt the new tubastrea's growth
Untitled-3.jpg


last up is the sponge/ eggs things, no idea what they are but also, what the heck is that little worm looking thing in the bottom left corner of this picture, he's really long and has black stripes, you can actually see it again in the middle sticking straight up (unsure if it's the same one and it's really long, or if it's a new one)
again this is in-between the skeleton of a pipe organ coral, also is that a little feather duster in the center right?
DSC07702-2.jpg


Thanks everybody for help so far :)
 

ISpeakForTheSeas

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Great pics!
First off is the mystery stony coral, still no idea what it is,
It may also be a Cladocora sp.
last up is the sponge/ eggs things, no idea what they are
They're either sponges or tunicates; if you look closely at the tips of them, you can see they have a circular opening - that's the out-current siphon of either a sponge or tunicate.
what the heck is that little worm looking thing in the bottom left corner of this picture, he's really long and has black stripes, you can actually see it again in the middle sticking straight up (unsure if it's the same one and it's really long, or if it's a new one)
Based on the unusually large parapodia (the little spikes where the bristles come out on polychaetes), I'd guess either a Hesionid or Nereid/Nereidid worm - if it has long, thin, hair-like bristles sticking out, then probably Hesionid; if not, then probably Nereid (there are definitely exceptions to this though).

Neither should cause any issues.
also is that a little feather duster in the center right?
That's the crown of a pineapple sponge.
 
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zeszes

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update on this
got some answers
the first coral is a type of balanophyllia, according to my old mentor in the hobby, it's one of the more obscure species and we couldn't narrow it down beyond balano just based on the skeleton and what it was hitchiking on which was a big piece of dendronepthya

next is the worm, yup it was a spionid, and it spread in the tank unfortunately and murked one of my acro frags until it was a little too late. I've done a pretty thorough treatment and scan over everything and I think I've gotten all of it, but hopefully it doesn't claim anymore coral

next up, I never found out what the little ball things were but more on that in a second. the crown was in fact a pineapple a pineapple sponge, it spread, I fought. I won!
the white egg looking things also spread, in fact they turned into a weird white film that coated the entire base and started to spread up, eventually choking out the lower parts of the pipe organ, after a lot of effort, they refused to come off, so I fragged it above the egg thing, gave it a dip, and a thorough inspection and in this process discovered what the striped tentacle was as well
it was the leg of a striped micro brittle star
and he had been busy making plenty of children, because I pulled probably 3 dozen from that pipe organ and put them right back in the tank, a few weeks later, I stole a few and threw them in my pico and they immediately took shelter in part of that pipe organ frag again. they finally got to return home.
 

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update on this
got some answers
the first coral is a type of balanophyllia, according to my old mentor in the hobby, it's one of the more obscure species and we couldn't narrow it down beyond balano just based on the skeleton and what it was hitchiking on which was a big piece of dendronepthya
I wouldn't trust most hobbyists' or vendors' IDs, especially for rarer corals like these. It doesn't look right for Balanophyllia--Balanophyllia have fewer primary septa that don't go over the theca as much--and there are plenty of other solitary a(po)zooxanthellate corals that look similar to this. Hitchhiking on a Dendronephthea means it's likely from the West Pacific, so that narrows it down a bit. My best guess is that it's a Paracyathus, but I would need a top-down view of the coral to be sure.
Paracyathus sp., New Caledonia | Credit: Damien Brouste
1713486719103.png
 

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