Nano or bigger?

NeilSharpton

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I am about to start my marine fish adventure with my daughter. I have several freshwater tanks and am a fairly experienced fish keeper in that realm, but marine tanks have always scared me. The issue I have now is tank size. Should I start with a nano or just jump in and go to either a 75 or 90? My main concern is if I mess up in a nano the cost won’t be so high as if I mess up in a four foot tank. Any help is appreciated
 
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mando21

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I am about to start my marine fish adventure with my daughter. I have several freshwater tanks and am a fairly experienced fish keeper in that realm, but marine tanks have always scared me. The issue I have now is tank size. Should I start with a nano or just jump in and go to either a 75 or 90? My main concern is if I mess up in a nano the cost won’t be so high as if I mess up in a four foot tank. Any help is appreciated
Regardless big or small it’s always going to be expensive go big I regret starting with a 13.5 evo. However it’s been fun bigger is better for more opportunities and options. Fish coral growth better filtration etc..
 

Jbell370

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I have a buddy of mine my old red sea all in one that was around the 32g mark. He has had great success as I did with that tank and he was coming from purely fresh water systems. I do like my little 16g biocube LED, just a couple of fish, snails and crab with easy coral like Xenia and Kenya.
 

Azedenkae

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I am about to start my marine fish adventure with my daughter. I have several freshwater tanks and am a fairly experienced fish keeper in that realm, but marine tanks have always scared me. The issue I have now is tank size. Should I start with a nano or just jump in and go to either a 75 or 90? My main concern is if I mess up in a nano the cost won’t be so high as if I mess up in a four foot tank. Any help is appreciated
I'd suggest a larger tank in this case. Given that there'd be another set of hands to help out, it should not be too bad.

I think costs can be higher if one messes up, but I think your daughter's interest can be kept for longer (or perhaps permanently) with a larger tank, since there will be more to see and explore. A small tank and it can get a bit boring to stare at sooner.

Just means you have to be surer with each investment or change you make. I think it might also be worthwhile to consider easier corals and stuff that has a higher chance of surviving and spreading, keeps both you and importantly, your daughter interested, seeing all the change. Also you can stock it with more (and diverse) fish, which again will be more interesting.

Just don't fall into the trap of having to get expensive things and you'd be fine.
 

Musovski

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i started with a 65, then moved to a 4x4x2 cube. i got lazy and maintenance kicked my butt. i felt too abused from school, tank husbandry and work. i would come home and work on these massive fish tank. i lost interest after having my dream tank... it wasn't a dream tank anymore. fast forward 8 months later. i now have a 10g cube. maintenance takes me 15-20 mins a week. im loving it again, its enjoyable. Bi-Weekly water change and sand siphon. weekly refill for RO/DI for ATO. Bi-weekly change of filter floss, chemipure blue (if needed on chemipure.) Monthly refill on pods, phyto.

and best of all

I get to keep my 2nd favorite fish! Yasha Goby :)
 
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Jekyl

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I am about to start my marine fish adventure with my daughter. I have several freshwater tanks and am a fairly experienced fish keeper in that realm, but marine tanks have always scared me. The issue I have now is tank size. Should I start with a nano or just jump in and go to either a 75 or 90? My main concern is if I mess up in a nano the cost won’t be so high as if I mess up in a four foot tank. Any help is appreciated
90 gallon. The smaller the tank the harder it is.
 

JayA

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Another vote for go small, as long as you like smaller fish and you are ok having a tank with fewer fish. I have a 20 gallon and find it totally manageable. Every time I have a thought about getting a second tank, I keep thinking even smaller - again so it is easy to manage, and fill. Also so much less equipment, which I totally like too.
 

Jekyl

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Another vote for go small, as long as you like smaller fish and you are ok having a tank with fewer fish. I have a 20 gallon and find it totally manageable. Every time I have a thought about getting a second tank, I keep thinking even smaller - again so it is easy to manage, and fill. Also so much less equipment, which I totally like too.
I have a 90 that I barely have to maintain at all. No sump or fuge and I only change water maybe once a month. Even then it's because I feel like I should, not that parameters dictate it. Even with the 90 I want a 300g.
 

JayA

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I have a 90 that I barely have to maintain at all. No sump or fuge and I only change water maybe once a month. Even then it's because I feel like I should, not that parameters dictate it. Even with the 90 I want a 300g.
wow, good to know!
 
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vetteguy53081

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Larger volume is more forgiving for build up of waste. However since you have small ones, utilize one for a quarantine tank.
Are the larger tanks reef ready? If not, you will have to focus on proper/good filtration. A hang on skimmer and hang on refugium will be your best bets.
 

Jedi1199

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My personal opinion is to go for a larger 4 ft tank like a 55+. I have a 32 Bio-Cube, a 55 and a 180 bowfront. The 55 is easy to maintain and changes happen more slowly than on the smaller tank, which makes it easier to keep ahead of issues.

That said, What are your variables? Can you afford to go larger? Do you have the space and time? Do you have an RODI system and a place to put it and store the water?

Nano tanks are an awesome way for those who have both limited space and budget to get their feet wet in the hobby. As mentioned above, more space= more diversity and more cost and work.

My advice.. Don't focus on tank size.. Do some homework and research what you want to stock. That will tell you what size tank you should get.
 
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