Wrasse help!

JoJosReef

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Also doesn't seem to be moving it's jaw. Sand sleepers can sometimes freak out and bang themselves against their transport bags or glass when they instinctively dive, breaking their jaw. Does the jaw look off centered? Unfortunately, I don't think they survive that injury.
 
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Good-ish news, she did move! Went to my LFS to see if they had any suggestions, and when I came back she was on the opposite side of the tank! She is still on her side though she did get up at one point
 
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Also doesn't seem to be moving it's jaw. Sand sleepers can sometimes freak out and bang themselves against their transport bags or glass when they instinctively dive, breaking their jaw. Does the jaw look off centered? Unfortunately, I don't think they survive that injury.
Yea, my lfs did mention that her lower jaw was swollen and that could be a possibility
 

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Did they tell you what salinity they are kept at? Many lfs keep their fish only systems at 1.018. You can’t go from that to 1.026 in 45 minutes. It takes days.
 
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Did they tell you what salinity they are kept at? Many lfs keep their fish only systems at 1.018. You can’t go from that to 1.026 in 45 minutes. It takes days.
Pretty sure they keep it at 1.024-1.026 (which is what I keep it at) they do have the occasional coral in the tanks and I doubt they would survive at those levels
 

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Fish does appear moribund and will likely not eat or swim normal or at all and there is no medication that can be recommended. You can try adding air stone for added oxygen but often . . .. Hope for the best and expect the worse.
 
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UPDATE: After 4 days of being in this condition the wrasse sadly passed away. At this point I do suspect it could have been an ammonia spike from being a large fish added to an already established aquarium, though I unfortunately do not possess an ammonia test kit so I am unsure. When I get the next fish i may add 3-4 large turban snails to the refeugium beforehand to have the ammonia cycle spike than pass. Though ammonia/nitrites shouldn't affect LPS, right?
 

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UPDATE: After 4 days of being in this condition the wrasse sadly passed away. At this point I do suspect it could have been an ammonia spike from being a large fish added to an already established aquarium, though I unfortunately do not possess an ammonia test kit so I am unsure. When I get the next fish i may add 3-4 large turban snails to the refeugium beforehand to have the ammonia cycle spike than pass. Though ammonia/nitrites shouldn't affect LPS, right?

Sorry to hear.

It almost positively was not an ammonia issue. If you have corals in the tank and they are doing well, it is virtually impossible to have an ammonia issue unless something went really wrong, like having something large decompose in the tank, or adding chemicals that kill the bacteria. Nitrite is not toxic to marine fish.

I think that we ruled out an acclimation issue, but there still seems to have been an immediate change in the fish going from the store to your tank. One thing that can happen - fish get struck by the net frame when being caught at the store, and then the fish is put in the bag, and you can't tell it was injured until you get home.

Jay
 
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Sorry to hear.

It almost positively was not an ammonia issue. If you have corals in the tank and they are doing well, it is virtually impossible to have an ammonia issue unless something went really wrong, like having something large decompose in the tank, or adding chemicals that kill the bacteria. Nitrite is not toxic to marine fish.

I think that we ruled out an acclimation issue, but there still seems to have been an immediate change in the fish going from the store to your tank. One thing that can happen - fish get struck by the net frame when being caught at the store, and then the fish is put in the bag, and you can't tell it was injured until you get home.

Jay
Well you were right, got the water tested today and only has trace amounts of ammonia and no nitrite, nothing that would affect a fish..
 

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