Can you have overflow plumbing under water?

ajremington68

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Will the plumbing being under the waterline in my sump make it quieter? Also will this allow my overflow to naturally start again? This is the current plumbing but I wonder if I can have the overflows go down more into the water. Water level will be at 10 in and one is at like 11 and almost 10. But my dad said something about the overflow won’t start again when you turn the return pump back on for the drain. How does this work can anyone weigh in please.
IMG_3694.jpeg
 

rhitee93

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I suspect I am missing something important about why you are asking, but yes you can run your drain lines so they exit under the surface of the water in your sump.

Both my main drain and emergency drain pipes terminate below the water level. However, most would tell you the best practice is to leave the emergency drain above the water level so that it makes noise to alert you something is wrong when water flows down it.
 

Serpentman2024

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Technically, it doesn't matter whether your outflow is submerged or not. However, it will splash and make more noise if it's not submerged. For the most quiet option, research "Bean Animal" aka "Herbie" drains.
 

DCR

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Your dad is partially correct in that it does make it more difficult and take longer to expel the air out of the pipe when you start-up, but a small amount of depth under the water level is almost always acceptable provided it is not excessively deep. That acceptable depth will ultimately depend on the diameter of the pipe and the flow rate of the water.
 

EeyoreIsMySpiritAnimal

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Also will this allow my overflow to naturally start again?
I don't understand what you are asking.
Your overflow /drains are gravity fed and will drain water once the overflow box is filled.
*unless I'm missing something about the overflow box... is it a HOB?

**Regardless of the type of overflow box having the pipes terminate under water won't affect anything but (possibly) the noise level.
 

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Your dad is partially correct in that it does make it more difficult and take longer to expel the air out of the pipe when you start-up, but a small amount of depth under the water level is almost always acceptable provided it is not excessively deep. That acceptable depth will ultimately depend on the diameter of the pipe and the flow rate of the water.
How would air get into the pipe?
 

DCR

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How would air get into the pipe?
Whenever you turn off your return pump, the water will drain down out of the pipe to the sump, and it will initially be filled with air when you restart the pump. You have to expel all that air to restart the siphon and having it sealed on the bottom end can make it more difficult to expel that air.
 

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Whenever you turn off your return pump, the water will drain down out of the pipe to the sump, and it will initially be filled with air when you restart the pump. You have to expel all that air to restart the siphon and having it sealed on the bottom end can make it more difficult to expel that air.
I was assuming no siphon needed.
Thanks.
 
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ajremington68

ajremington68

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I don't understand what you are asking.
Your overflow /drains are gravity fed and will drain water once the overflow box is filled.
*unless I'm missing something about the overflow box... is it a HOB?

**Regardless of the type of overflow box having the pipes terminate under water won't affect anything but (possibly) the noise level.
IMG_3370.jpeg

This is the type of overflow. Also never had one like this, that’s why I have no clue
 

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IMG_3370.jpeg

This is the type of overflow. Also never had one like this, that’s why I have no clue
So, this is an internal overflow... a box inside the tank. You don't need to worry about a siphon the way you would on a HOB overflow box.

Personally, I would make the following changes:
1. It looks like the pipes are 2 different sizes -- you want the larger diameter pipe to be the emergency drain
2. Ditch the Durso (elbow) on the main drain and just use a strainer (I prefer the flat ones, but the one you have is fine)
 
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