How can I get rid of this turf algae?

Deltec

sixline

Active Member
View Badges
Joined
May 10, 2020
Messages
309
Reaction score
346
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
...at least I think it is turf algae.

The stuff is a very dense and stiff bristly mat that really roots itself into the live rock. It roots so well, that when I peel it off (which is tough), It takes some of the rock (or maybe coralline) with it. That's what the white stuff is in the second photo.

The only three options I can think of are starving it, or adding something that eats it or outcompetes it.

I'm a bit hesitant about starving it since I have two engineer gobies that I need to feed.

I have a variety of snails, two small urchins, and some emerald crabs, but nothing seems to touch it. I'm considering ordering some chitons from reef cleaners, but I'm heard somewhere they can leave scratches if they migrate onto the glass in the aquarium. I frequently travel, so I can't keep an eye on them and would hate to return to a tank full of scratches.

I'm considering some sort of display tank macro to compete with it, but not sure. Unfortunately, I do not have any space in the sump for a refugium or algae scrubber or similar.

Any ideas on what this stuff is and how to get rid of it?

Thanks in advance.

1567885-42e9f431b60b78e4f4ef7135fed3982e.jpg
1567886-25d5d6e601a5778b9c9b49f4372820f0.jpg
 
Top Shelf Aquatics

TexanCanuck

Active Member
View Badges
Joined
Feb 10, 2021
Messages
200
Reaction score
187
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
Location
Dallas, TX
I'm afraid I can't help you positively ID what kind of algae it is, but I have had very good success managing all forms of nuisance algae with a product called Vibrant.

If you so a search for "vibrant" here on R2R you will find lots of folks with experience with this product.

You can buy it from the manufacturer here:


You can also find it on BRS and Amazon.

Good luck!

I'll be monitoring this thread to see if anyone can positively ID what kind of algae it is!
 

S.Pepper

Valuable Member
View Badges
Joined
Sep 21, 2019
Messages
2,221
Reaction score
9,481
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
That looks very similar to what I am dealing with now. I was told it was green turf algae. I was told Fluconazole will work on some types of turf algae. I on my fifth day since dosing fluconazole and there doesn't see to be much progress, other than my filter socks are getting a slight green tint to them. Who knows? I'm going to give it until this weekend and if there continues to be little to no progress, I'm going to try Vibrant. GL


byp1.jpg
 

vetteguy53081

Well known Member and monster tank lover
View Badges
Joined
Aug 11, 2013
Messages
48,786
Reaction score
110,729
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
Location
Wisconsin - Florida in several months
What is known as "Green Turf Algae" in the hobby is really a generic name given to hundreds of different species of macroalgae that describe certain similar characteristics. They are coarse, wiry, and generally have thicker wider blades than Green Hair Algae. They may or may not have a mat like root structure, sometimes they just seem to sprout from the rock.
Turf algae that sprouts directly from the rock can be a pain to control, as it is difficult if not impossible to pluck it all. Once discovered it should be treated outside of the aquarium, perhaps by dipping the affected rock or frag in water treated with an algaecide.Turf algae that grows with a "root" mat can be peeled by pushing down on the algae as you scrape your thumb against the rock dislodging it in one swoop. Let it get big enough so you have leverage. The 3reef member who removed this piece did it perfectly.
Clean up Crew members that will eat Green Turf Algae include inverts with considerable cutting power like urchins, chitons, and emerald crabs. My best defense was a 10 day blackout utilizing ambient light in the room
 
Corals.com

S.Pepper

Valuable Member
View Badges
Joined
Sep 21, 2019
Messages
2,221
Reaction score
9,481
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
What is known as "Green Turf Algae" in the hobby is really a generic name given to hundreds of different species of macroalgae that describe certain similar characteristics. They are coarse, wiry, and generally have thicker wider blades than Green Hair Algae. They may or may not have a mat like root structure, sometimes they just seem to sprout from the rock.
Turf algae that sprouts directly from the rock can be a pain to control, as it is difficult if not impossible to pluck it all. Once discovered it should be treated outside of the aquarium, perhaps by dipping the affected rock or frag in water treated with an algaecide.Turf algae that grows with a "root" mat can be peeled by pushing down on the algae as you scrape your thumb against the rock dislodging it in one swoop. Let it get big enough so you have leverage. The 3reef member who removed this piece did it perfectly.
Clean up Crew members that will eat Green Turf Algae include inverts with considerable cutting power like urchins, chitons, and emerald crabs. My best defense was a 10 day blackout utilizing ambient light in the room

thx, vetteguy. I already read that post in another thread. lol I have about 10 hermit blue/red hermit crabs and a few snails. I had a big CUC order that took 8 days to be delivered--there were 2 emerald crabs that died, along with everything else. I have 20 more hermits being delivered tomorrow. And yes, the hermits are eating away at this algae.
 

JayLu

Active Member
View Badges
Joined
Feb 16, 2020
Messages
110
Reaction score
185
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
I had a ton of turf algae that looked similar to yours. I got a long spine urchin and it ate all of it. But once the turf algae was gone, it started eating my coral.
 

KrisReef

5000 Club Member
View Badges
Joined
May 15, 2018
Messages
5,431
Reaction score
17,125
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
Location
ADX Florence
...at least I think it is turf algae.

The stuff is a very dense and stiff bristly mat that really roots itself into the live rock. It roots so well, that when I peel it off (which is tough), It takes some of the rock (or maybe coralline) with it. That's what the white stuff is in the second photo.

The only three options I can think of are starving it, or adding something that eats it or outcompetes it.

I'm a bit hesitant about starving it since I have two engineer gobies that I need to feed.

I have a variety of snails, two small urchins, and some emerald crabs, but nothing seems to touch it. I'm considering ordering some chitons from reef cleaners, but I'm heard somewhere they can leave scratches if they migrate onto the glass in the aquarium. I frequently travel, so I can't keep an eye on them and would hate to return to a tank full of scratches.

I'm considering some sort of display tank macro to compete with it, but not sure. Unfortunately, I do not have any space in the sump for a refugium or algae scrubber or similar.

Any ideas on what this stuff is and how to get rid of it?

Thanks in advance.

1567885-42e9f431b60b78e4f4ef7135fed3982e.jpg
1567886-25d5d6e601a5778b9c9b49f4372820f0.jpg
Nice photo and description. Sorry that you have this is in your tank. I got a red version on a frag years ago. I ended up pulling the rock and scraping, adding tangs, and "Mexican Turbo-snails" and nothing seemed to help. I gave up, let the tank run on auto pilot, didn't scrap algae for two years, just fed the fish and eventually I beleive the coralline algae was able to get the better end of the rock and it went into submission-remission. That was about 4 years ago. I noticed a little resurgence at the beginning of this year so I pulled the few rocks it was on, hit them with 3% peroxide and it turned a lovely white in death, like ashes?

Along the way, I did attempt Vibrant and did not see any improvement from that product. GL.
 
OP
sixline

sixline

Active Member
View Badges
Joined
May 10, 2020
Messages
309
Reaction score
346
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
My best defense was a 10 day blackout utilizing ambient light in the room

Now that's something I hadn't thought of doing. If I understand correctly, you turned off your lights for ten days, and only allowed the ambient light from the room to enter the tanks, thus starving the algae of light - is that correct? How well did it work? And was there any damage to the xooanthellae (sp?) in the corals, or did they all make it through?
 
Reef Chasers Aquaculture
Deltec

Do you house a "Reef Safe" Angelfish in your reef tank?

  • YES and it's going good

    Votes: 204 41.2%
  • YES but it's not working out

    Votes: 13 2.6%
  • NO I have tried it in the past and it didn't work out

    Votes: 44 8.9%
  • NO I haven't tried yet

    Votes: 218 44.0%
  • Other (please explain)

    Votes: 16 3.2%
Go to www.aqua-ops.com for high end corals!
Top