Interested in Exact Idip - Some questions

Crashjack

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I’m looking at your product but have some questions:
  1. Is there a “cheat sheet” that gives the commonly measured forms and units… e.g. those that Salifert, Red Sea, Hannah, etc. measure? I love that various forms and units can be measured and realize that for someone who knows a lot about reef chemistry, some of the options are probably more telling than the measurements us commoners watch with standard test kits, but a lot of us just know an element and the common units, i.e. calcium - 420 PPM. We have no idea what form of the element we are measuring or how other units of measurement relate. Also, total alkalinity definitions vary and then there is total alkalinity vs. carbonate alkalinity vs. other alkalinity descriptions. I’m not looking for arguments as to which form or unit of measurement is best, just which ones relate to most other test kits and an explanation when/if there is a difference. I’m hoping to identify the setup parameters I would use to match the forms/units I’ve been measuring with my other test kits and if an iDip test doesn’t correlate exactly, how the results would relate to most other test kits.
  2. Is RO required for all of the rinsing or does tap water work just as well?
  3. Once opened, how long are the reagents and strips good for?
  4. Is there any PC interface?
  5. Are testing results organized and stored on a website or is everything just stored on the personal device used?
  6. Are there reports like with ICP Analysis that show tested measurements vs. norms?
Thanks!
 
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Crashjack

Crashjack

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I filled out the contact form on their website and directed to their sales department, asking the same questions I posted here and received the same response (e.g. none). I was very interested in this as a large, expensive automated device with a litany of reagents, calibration solutions, and a Christmas tree of dosing pumps, just doesn’t do it for me. Unfortunately, I’m afraid the eXact iDip Marine 570 is going or maybe has already gone the way of the Dodo bird, the Mindstream, and the Vertex Cerebra.
 
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Crashjack

Crashjack

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***Update***

I received a response from Sensafe and wanted to share:

Great questions.

1. Here is a cheat sheet which lets you know the conversion rates for each unit of measure:
https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/18fvDA1fcXWWhvUMmydxR9pivRHATBXxAJuYY-zoBxNo/edit?usp=sharing

The difference between the units is simply math, and different markets utilize different units. With calcium hardness for example, pool chemists use ppm (as CaCO3), aquarists use ppm (as Ca+2) or sometimes degrees of general hardness (dGH), brewers use grains per gallon (gpg), and so on. Our total alkalinity reagents measure the total carbonates and bicarbonates and will not pick up other salts and buffers.
2. Tap water, if clean, is fine to be used to rinse the meter’s cell.
3. Different reagents vary in shelf life and range anywhere from 6 months to 2 years. Each bottle has a seal and desiccant to help stay it fresh, but there is an expiration date printed on each one.
4. There is no PC interface with the app. However, you can email your results and download them as a CSV file.
5. Your test results are stored in the app of your personal device and can be organized by date/time, customer, site (tank), company, or test parameter. If you conduct lots of testing, so much so that it slows down the app, there is the option to archive your results to our database at idipdata.com. In the archived database, the results can be sorted by date.
6. Each of our test parameters have a Best Accuracy percentage. These values represent the best possible accuracy under laboratory conditions but may vary throughout the detection range. Please visit the iDip 570 webpage (eXact iDip® 570 nm ) and look under the ‘Tests and Reagents’ tab for the accuracy.

I hope this helps and let me know if I can answer anything else.

Kind regards,
Brooke Boltz
Technical Product Manager
Industrial Test Systems, Inc. (ITS)
Innovators of Water Quality Testing
1875 Langston Street Rock Hill, SC 29730

PH 803.329.9712 ext 237 www.sensafe.com

I then replied/asked:

The spreadsheet shows various units including different forms (as CaCO3, as HCO3, etc.). I still don’t understand how the units (really the forms identified with the units) compare to common test kits. For instance, I don’t know if my Hannah alk checker is measuring alkalinity as CaCO3, HCO3, or something else. I just know that I want to be around 8.5 dkh. With my Salifert Ca test kit, I just know that I want to be 400+ ppm, but I have no idea if it is measuring as CaCO3, Ca+2, or something else. For example, I might measure 300 ppm calcium as CaCO3 with the iDip and think my calcium is very low. However, it might be that Salifert and others are measuring as Ca+2, and my 300 ppm CaCO3 measurement might actually be perfect. I’ve used quite a few test kits and though they might present in different units: ppm, dkh, etc., they all appear to measure the same form.

Can you straighten me out on this?

Brooke's response:

Typically, aquarium kits all use the same units: dKH for alkalinity, ppm as Ca+2 for calcium, and ppm as Mg+2 for magnesium. You would notice if it was reading the wrong unit of measurement because the numbers would be drastically different from your expected levels. For example, 8.5 dKH would read 151.78 ppm as CaCO3, and 400 ppm Ca+2 would read 1000ppm CaCO3.
 

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