Nothing "Hard" Survives in my Tank!!!

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gbru316

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Also a good point, I’ve helped jf out a couple times at his place and talked with quite a few other coral farmers. Him and others whose entire livelihood depends on coral growth and coloration, yet they all tend to keep all at ~8.
If higher alk were truly advantageous and truly made corals grow faster, would these coral farms not all be running 12?

I feel like this high alkalinity method that I often see with newer/less experienced reefers is fed to them through some sort of product/advertising and is never really utilized by the leads in the industry. I have yet to come across anyone of note running an all that high, despite running other “iffy” methods such as monthly chemiclean dosing.

See my edit about Sanjay Joshi
 
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Pntbll687

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No I get that, I was just saying the amount of reagent in the syringe is 1ml when looking at the tip of the little nub and the measurement lines. If I pulled the plunger all the way back, it would have 1.8ml of reagent. Here's a picture of what I'm doing. You can see the little nub is right at the .1ml line, but the main part of the plunger is up past the top line. If I do it the other way, the plunger is way up at the top of the syringe like in the bottom picture.

Doing it either way I get the same reading--11.6 dkh

IMG_5167.jpg


IMG_5168.jpg
SO you're actually using more reagent than 1ml. The first seal above the nipple part should be at 0, not the nipple. You're alk may be higher than what that is reading.

Why not for funzies, just run the test the way the directions say to see what it says??

But I think nitrates are probably the issue. I have found the API test to read consistently when nitrates are above 10ppm. And for reading the color, it should be held across the color spectrum bands. The band that "disappears" is going to be the closest match to the nitrate level. I'm thinking nitrates are probably lower than 5ppm and dip close to zero, causing issues.

I would run the test as as directed by the manufacturer and get a baseline numbers again. Then mix some fresh saltwater and test that for alk, the numbers should be somewhat close to each other, I'd say within .5dkh.
 
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paulgriffin971

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SO you're actually using more reagent than 1ml. The first seal above the nipple part should be at 0, not the nipple. You're alk may be higher than what that is reading.

Why not for funzies, just run the test the way the directions say to see what it says??

But I think nitrates are probably the issue. I have found the API test to read consistently when nitrates are above 10ppm. And for reading the color, it should be held across the color spectrum bands. The band that "disappears" is going to be the closest match to the nitrate level. I'm thinking nitrates are probably lower than 5ppm and dip close to zero, causing issues.

I would run the test as as directed by the manufacturer and get a baseline numbers again. Then mix some fresh saltwater and test that for alk, the numbers should be somewhat close to each other, I'd say within .5dkh.
I did that. Doing it either way comes out with the same result--11.6 dkh.

I think i understand what others are talking about with regard to alkalinity vs phosphates and nitrates. High DKH needs to be matched by ultra low phosphates and nitrates. Lower dkh needs to be matched with higher phosphates and nitrates.

Have I got that right or have I got it backwards?
 

CrunchyBananas

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I did that. Doing it either way comes out with the same result--11.6 dkh.

I think i understand what others are talking about with regard to alkalinity vs phosphates and nitrates. High DKH needs to be matched by ultra low phosphates and nitrates. Lower dkh needs to be matched with higher phosphates and nitrates.

Have I got that right or have I got it backwards?
Not quite, flip that, high alk needs high nutrients, low alk is better for low nutrients. You can think of it as fueling different growth, nutrients for skin and polyps alk and calcium for skeleton. If your alk is too high with low nutrients, the skeleton can put pace the skin growth, thus “burnt tips” with the skeleton poking out. It’s about finding that balance for balanced growth.
 

thatmanMIKEson

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I think water changes just causes too many issues. Change your temperature which messes with corals, changes to alk, calcium in the water, corals love stability.
Why would any of that be different than what your system is running, that doesn't make any sense
 
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paulgriffin971

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Not quite, flip that, high alk needs high nutrients, low alk is better for low nutrients. You can think of it as fueling different growth, nutrients for skin and polyps alk and calcium for skeleton. If your alk is too high with low nutrients, the skeleton can put pace the skin growth, thus “burnt tips” with the skeleton poking out. It’s about finding that balance for balanced growth.
OK got it. I'll sit back and wait a few weeks to see what happens. Chalk this one up to another attempt :)
 
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