Repopulating the Reef Through Ranching! A Collaborative Effort by Quality Marine and TMC!

Nutramar Foods

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In an exciting partnership, Quality Marine, in collaboration with Tropical Marine Center (TMC) in the UK and ecocean, have embarked on a program that centers on ranching species using night light traps.

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In this innovative approach, post-larval fish are drawn to light and gather in specially designed illuminated traps. These night light traps can be deployed in various marine environments and are currently in use in several locations. The origins of this concept trace back over two decades and was initially tested to quantify the distribution and abundance of larval fishes, and also as a stock-enhancement release program for coral reef species. The research findings suggested that the traps yielded better results when strategically placed in specific habitats, and notably, higher survival rates were observed when juvenile fishes were released into the ocean at a more advanced stage of development. Different ecological studies are currently underway to assess how environmental factors impact fish recruitment, diversity, mortality rates, and habitat selection during settlement.

Sustainability stands at the forefront, for the long-term viability of our trade and the well-being of our aquatic habitats, and our commitment to supporting these types of programs as well as land-based and in-situ aquaculture continues and grows. The method of capturing tiny post-larvae species solely through light-based techniques not only augments sustainable wild harvest, but also complements our aquaculture efforts. By cultivating and raising these species within a controlled environment, they are protected from predation, which significantly increasing their chances of survival. This initiative proves especially significant since a substantial portion of larvae species in the wild, never reach maturity due to natural attrition. Moreover, healthy ranched marine species exhibit far greater survival rates than their counterparts left to fend for themselves in the open ocean. Any surplus populations not destined for the aquarium trade can be released back onto the reef at a juvenile stage where their chances of survival increase significantly, which contributes to the replenishment of wild reef species populations.

Our decision to embark on this project has allows us to both strengthen existing partnerships that support small island communities and forge new ones. This support translates into improved economic well-being and an additional income source for these communities. Furthermore, the program strengthens our collaboration with local scientists and researchers, bolstering efforts to promote conservation.

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Currently, Quality Marine is receiving a variety of ranched species through these ranching activities using night light traps, and include species of Cardinalfish, Damselfish, Grunts, and Chromis. Upon arrival, these tiny specimens undergo a careful acclimation process to adjust to their new water parameters. During their stay at Quality Marine, these ranched species are under the care of resident biologists and experienced husbandry team. Subsequently, they are transitioned to prepared diets, which include Nutramar dry diets and Gamma Frozen Foods. Holding and growing these ranched, post-larvae fishes for period of time, allows them to grow to a marketable size and become well-adjusted to aquarium environments.

Sustainability remains a core value of Quality Marine, ingrained in our company's history. Our commitment to supporting ranched species was an easy decision. Looking ahead, our aspirations are directed toward streamlining this process through ongoing research and encouraging more coastal fisheries to embrace similar programs. We anticipate continued partnerships and collaborations with scientists and researchers in remote locations across the globe. click here to learn more

 

Daniel@R2R

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Tony Thompson

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Hi @Nutramar Foods , thanks for sharing.

Could you please clear up some terminolgy used please. "Post Larval" and "Juvenile". What is the differance? thanks.

Brian Schaff makes a number of comments in the video.

"new sustainable method of collecting" ?

This methodology of raising post larvae as opposed to (tank bred) for the marine ornamental trade has been around for a significant number of years. Sustainable Aquatics and its Sustainable Islands Project comes to mind.

Are QM and TMC working alongside Sustainable Aquatics?

"Incredibly Sustainable" ? "For every fish we bring to the industry, we put two back in"

Incredibly that sounds like a net profit to the environment.

I am a little confused by that statement. However if one where to rephrase that to, for every 3 fish we take we return 2, would be more credible.

Could you indicate your predicted losses due to mortality from collection to retailer for this method, compared to wild collection figures. Not the less than 1% stated as fact in the flawed and misleading OATO publication.

As advertised in the video as partnering with Ecocean, The original plan from your partners Ecocean, such as the project Pangatalan island for the SULUBAAI foundation Development of PCC for community aquaculture and repopulation of reefs with juveniles. Was to return all the raised fish back to the ocean.

On a positive note, I welcome any initiatives by the trade, including efforts by QM to find alternative and sustainable methods. I just wish the trade would be more transparent, open and a little less disingenuous. The truth will set you free.
 
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Nutramar Foods

Nutramar Foods

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Hi @Nutramar Foods , thanks for sharing.

Could you please clear up some terminolgy used please. "Post Larval" and "Juvenile". What is the differance? thanks.

Brian Schaff makes a number of comments in the video.

"new sustainable method of collecting" ?

This methodology of raising post larvae as opposed to (tank bred) for the marine ornamental trade has been around for a significant number of years. Sustainable Aquatics and its Sustainable Islands Project comes to mind.

Are QM and TMC working alongside Sustainable Aquatics?

"Incredibly Sustainable" ? "For every fish we bring to the industry, we put two back in"

Incredibly that sounds like a net profit to the environment.

I am a little confused by that statement. However if one where to rephrase that to, for every 3 fish we take we return 2, would be more credible.

Could you indicate your predicted losses due to mortality from collection to retailer for this method, compared to wild collection figures. Not the less than 1% stated as fact in the flawed and misleading OATO publication.

As advertised in the video as partnering with Ecocean, The original plan from your partners Ecocean, such as the project Pangatalan island for the SULUBAAI foundation Development of PCC for community aquaculture and repopulation of reefs with juveniles. Was to return all the raised fish back to the ocean.

On a positive note, I welcome any initiatives by the trade, including efforts by QM to find alternative and sustainable methods. I just wish the trade would be more transparent, open and a little less disingenuous. The truth will set you free.
Hi Tony,
Thank you for reaching for commenting and the support!

Post-Larval is after the larvae's yolk sac (food source) is used up and the specimen begins to need alternate food sources. This is the stage in fish larval development from formation of the caudal fin (flexion).
Juveniles is the development stage from completion of fin and scale development to sexual maturity. Juveniles are slightly smaller than adults.

At this time we are only partnering with TMC and ecocean on this project.

We are at the beginning stages still but are really looking forward seeing more positive results.
 

livinlifeinBKK

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Just a couple things: have you improved on the light trap design? It's very old, nonselective technology which is why they originally used them to assess all recruits.
Isn't it a little inefficient to collect species which aren't your target species and raise them?
Lastly, you train them to eat prepared foods as soon as possible which is good if they are sold for the aquarium trade but I don't think a fish that's only eaten prepared foods throughout it's life is going to fare well in the wild.

Just a couple curiosities.
 
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Nutramar Foods

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Hello,
thank you very much for your interest in this program. Over the years the traps have been receiving continued refinement to increase their efficiency. The traps are being strategically placed in areas to attract reef species of which we are capturing mostly damsels and chromis. Specimens that are being imported to our facility for the aquarium hobby are the ones being switched to prepared diets.
 

Daniel@R2R

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I love learning about these kinds of efforts that help to provide for the conservation of the reef and the sustainability of the hobby. I'll be excited to see how this continues to progress!
 

Welcoming coral to your home!!! How do you add coral to your tank?

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    Votes: 11 9.2%
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    Votes: 15 12.5%
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    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Dip process before placing the coral into the quarantine tank.

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