Sakura anthias

Top Shelf Aquatics

pcon

Well-Known Member
View Badges
Joined
Jan 13, 2018
Messages
623
Reaction score
1,437
No personal experience, but the little I have stumbled across looking at their other deepwater cousins suggests the sakura/cherry anthias in particular need cooler tanks. My understanding is they are considered temperate or semi temperate. and do best under 75f. Which is a bit cooler than our tropical corals love. With their recent surge in availability it would be nice to find out if that is true.
 

Lateral72

Chaetodontidae
View Badges
Joined
Oct 25, 2010
Messages
612
Reaction score
76
No personal experience, but the little I have stumbled across looking at their other deepwater cousins suggests the sakura/cherry anthias in particular need cooler tanks. My understanding is they are considered temperate or semi temperate. and do best under 75f. Which is a bit cooler than our tropical corals love. With their recent surge in availability it would be nice to find out if that is true.
They aren't found very deep, but they are a temperate species and really need to be kept at 68-72°F for optimum health.
 

pcon

Well-Known Member
View Badges
Joined
Jan 13, 2018
Messages
623
Reaction score
1,437
They aren't found very deep, but they are a temperate species and really need to be kept at 68-72°F for optimum health.
You are right, seems they only are found 25-50or75M depending on the source.
They are often talked about in the same circles as the deeper anthias, ventralis, borbonius and Tosanoides. They are even mislabeled as a deep water species. That does however suggest they may be less adaptable to warmer waters unlike the deep tropicals.
 
Top Shelf Aquatics
OP
Angel_Anthias lover

Angel_Anthias lover

Valuable Member
View Badges
Joined
Apr 24, 2018
Messages
1,125
Reaction score
1,307
You are right, seems they only are found 25-50or75M depending on the source.
They are often talked about in the same circles as the deeper anthias, ventralis, borbonius and Tosanoides. They are even mislabeled as a deep water species. That does however suggest they may be less adaptable to warmer waters unlike the deep tropicals.
Why does that suggest they may be less adaptable, i dont really understand a lot about that stuff lol
 

pcon

Well-Known Member
View Badges
Joined
Jan 13, 2018
Messages
623
Reaction score
1,437
This is all conjecture, but take the hobby favorite O. borbonius most commonly found 200-300m where it's often quite a bit cooler than our 78-82f most tanks are kept in. However borbonius readily thrives in our warm tanks. Similar arguments can be made for a bunch of the deep water Hogfish. It seems even if the deep tropicals spend most of their time in deep cooler waters they can thrive at our reef temps. Where temperates like C. Interruptus need to be adapted to tropical temps before a certain size to thrive in our warm reefs.
 

WMR

Well-Known Member
View Badges
Joined
Apr 27, 2019
Messages
511
Reaction score
2,225
Some, not all, “deep” water anthias can acclimate to reef temps, as long as you keep your reef tween 76-80f, I’ve found that acclimating most deepwater species that you should adjust the lighting to help them acclimate( or have plenty of dark hiding places in the tank) & feed live foods initially to get them eating & have passive tankmates
 
OP
Angel_Anthias lover

Angel_Anthias lover

Valuable Member
View Badges
Joined
Apr 24, 2018
Messages
1,125
Reaction score
1,307
This is all conjecture, but take the hobby favorite O. borbonius most commonly found 200-300m where it's often quite a bit cooler than our 78-82f most tanks are kept in. However borbonius readily thrives in our warm tanks. Similar arguments can be made for a bunch of the deep water Hogfish. It seems even if the deep tropicals spend most of their time in deep cooler waters they can thrive at our reef temps. Where temperates like C. Interruptus need to be adapted to tropical temps before a certain size to thrive in our warm reefs.
Some, not all, “deep” water anthias can acclimate to reef temps, as long as you keep your reef tween 76-80f, I’ve found that acclimating most deepwater species that you should adjust the lighting to help them acclimate( or have plenty of dark hiding places in the tank) & feed live foods initially to get them eating & have passive tankmates
Thank you for explaining, so ventralis anthias would essentially adapt better to warmer water than say a temperate species like chaetodon litus
 

pcon

Well-Known Member
View Badges
Joined
Jan 13, 2018
Messages
623
Reaction score
1,437
@Angel_Anthias lover That’s my interpretation of the general trends I have seen in the hobby.
That being said I’m not a biologist, just cosplay one online. And as WMR there are exceptions, not all deepwater species do well at our reef temps, and there are temperates who can handle warmer waters.
 
https://www.omegasea.net/

How happy are you with the lighting "color" of your saltwater aquarium?

  • 10 (extremely happy)

    Votes: 45 15.5%
  • 9

    Votes: 35 12.0%
  • 8

    Votes: 65 22.3%
  • 7

    Votes: 61 21.0%
  • 6

    Votes: 35 12.0%
  • 5

    Votes: 22 7.6%
  • 4

    Votes: 15 5.2%
  • 3

    Votes: 7 2.4%
  • 2

    Votes: 1 0.3%
  • 1 (hate it)

    Votes: 5 1.7%

Online statistics

Members online
2,419
Guests online
5,369
Total visitors
7,788
Top