220 Gallon Tank Setup

Discussion in 'Connecticut Area Reef Society' started by cccharliecc, Dec 1, 2017.

  1. cccharliecc

    cccharliecc Well-Known Member

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    So I will be setting up a 220 gallon tank and will post pics of it along the way. I do have some initial questions though that I need help/advice with.
    I am thinking of going FOWLER for the most part with semi aggressive fish.

    1. Should I go live rock or dry rock?
    2. What substrate should i use? Live sand/dry sand or something else?
    3. If I go dry rock, how to I "seed" the tank/get it cycled?
    See....I told you I've been out for a while :)

    Also what is the best way to clean up the tank and equipment I'm getting?

    Thanks!
     
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  2. sassAwrasse

    sassAwrasse Well-Known Member R2R Supporter CTARS Member

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    Go dry rock so you don't have any pest issues.

    You can get the cycle started with a table shrimp OR you can get something like Dr. Tim's nitrifying bacteria.

    Sand is your preference.
     
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  3. fastest302

    fastest302 Well-Known Member CTARS Member

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    Yup what sassAwrasse says and if you want look into fritz turbo900 I used it when I setup my 20g long and had a instant cycle and used dry rock and dry sand
     
  4. Radman73

    Radman73 Well-Known Member Build Thread Contributor

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    Welcome to the 220 club. Pro's and Con's to dry vs live. I've started with dry for my build but will be adding some live at some point. I'm not sure these sterile environments we've tried setting up are good for the long haul. We should probably aim for major pest free and go from there lol!

    While I generally assume live sand is dead by the time we open it and put it in the tank, I actually have seen very small shrimp swimming around in an unopened bag of live sand before, so who knows. Another area where you could go largely dry(rinse it well), with maybe a little live to go with it.

    Seed a dry rock environment with a couple of available bacteria in bottle products. Then, use pure ammonia dosed to 2.5ppm or you're favorite rotting shrimp to start the cycle. I like to use a seachem ammonia a left badge to track the ammonia swing. Once you can dose 2-2.5ppm ammonia and have both ammonia and nitrite gone within 24 hours, you can add your first couple of fish.

    Good luck!
     
  5. cccharliecc

    cccharliecc Well-Known Member

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    Sounds like a plan....I will have more questions for sure as I get closer and closer.
     
  6. cccharliecc

    cccharliecc Well-Known Member

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    I am thinking of doing that dry rock I posted in my other thread, along with dry sand. Then I think maybe the turbo start or dr tim's stuff to get the tank going quick. Then a few hearty fish that I want to keep actually. Not damsels!
     
  7. pecan2phat

    pecan2phat Well-Known Member

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    Now there is a trend where a lot of people cook or leech out the phosphates in dry rock (even newly bought) prior to using in the display tank but this would need to done ahead of time since it can take weeks to months.
     
  8. Faisal27

    Faisal27 Well-Known Member

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    Live rock is much easier and less time consuming .. better in the short run for you Fish to pick food from it since they will be shy in the beginning .. I would say live sand also .. goood luck buddy looking froward to the updates
     
  9. kgstei

    kgstei Well-Known Member CTARS Member

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    I have to Say I love my little yellowtail blue damsel great color doesn't bother anybody and cheap. My tank is a 120 I think in a larger tank you can get away with one or two without any problems. That is unless you get a real jerk!
     
  10. Blitzie

    Blitzie Well-Known Member CTARS Member

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    There are pros and cons to the live verses dry rock.
    Live Rock Yes you get beneficial items to seed your tank, but you also risk the bad things you may not see. its also quite a bit more expensive.
    Dry Rock is Pest free but may have a phosphate leeching depending where it came from. (I used Marco Rocks and had no issues though). It is also much cheaper.

    Personally I prefer to use dry rock and then seed it with live rock obtained from a source I know and trust. (PM me for the name if your interested).
     
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