Chipped glass when drilling for overflow

Ronnie Burda

Member
View Badges
Joined
Nov 9, 2018
Messages
15
Reaction score
8
Location
Philadelphia
So I was drilling my holes in the side of my brand new Aqueon 120 that is going to be a peninsula tank yesterday. The first hole came out great but not that good on the second one. When the drill broke through the inside of the glass took a decent chunk out around the hole. It’s not to deep of chip but decent size around. It’s a big enough chip that the seal on the bulk head won’t completely cover it. My thought is since that side will be back in the cabinet a inch or two, can I just get another piece of glass cut to fit the inside and seal around the outside edge of the new piece so the bulkhead will seal? And I hoping it will add a little extra strength to that end so the chip won’t cause anymore damage.
A3A2B8A7-3FF4-4136-9AC1-F90514791B60.jpeg
1F812AA2-7CDE-425A-83E9-01F6D0A06D0B.jpeg
310C5104-6880-454B-9529-AAD5F2D135BF.jpeg
 
Top Shelf Aquatics

flagg37

Active Member
View Badges
Joined
May 28, 2016
Messages
218
Reaction score
212
Location
Colorado
You’re probably not going to like to hear this but I’d recommend replacing that piece. Those chips create weak spots and the bigger they are the weaker it makes that piece of glass. Already having a hole in the glass weakens the glass even if it’s cut perfectly. If you were to use a piece of glass on the inside, it would have to be the same thickness and siliconed so that it is taking the full load of the water. In the end it will probably be more work than just replacing that piece.
 

hotdrop

Active Member
View Badges
Joined
Jan 29, 2019
Messages
277
Reaction score
289
You could always drill a bigger hole to remove the damage, that being said the bulkhead fitting should prevent a lot of load from getting there provided you extend past the edge of the damage
 
https://www.omegasea.net/

Greybeard

Valuable Member
View Badges
Joined
Feb 10, 2017
Messages
2,419
Reaction score
5,910
Ugh. You probably don't want to hear this.

Seriously. Stop reading.

A little chip out is common, no big deal. IHMO, that's not a little chip.

If you were to patch that, double it up, run the bulkhead through... it might work. Probably, even. Still, you've gotta balance risk vs cost.

Where is this tank going? In a basement? On a concrete floor? With a drain? Sure, go ahead.

Going in your living room, over a plywood subfloor, carpet, with a room below? Finished ceiling, perhaps?

What's a new 120 cost? It's Black Friday... should be deals out there. Balance (another!) new glass box against the cost of repairs to your home should you dump 120 gallons of salt water, rock, sand... not to mention the cost of the animals filling your reef...

I think I'd write it off and try again.
 

Sailfin11

Active Member
View Badges
Joined
Nov 4, 2019
Messages
127
Reaction score
155
Location
Chicago, IL
You could always drill a bigger hole to remove the damage, that being said the bulkhead fitting should prevent a lot of load from getting there provided you extend past the edge of the damage
This is ABSOLUTELY what you should do. A new $20 drill bit is a lot cheaper than a new tank. If you drilled for 1 inch, I would switch to a 1.5" bulkhead and then just put a reducer on to get to your desired pipe size. Keep us posted on the progress!
 
Corals.com

Where do you go in case of a real reef tank emergency?

  • Me, myself and I

    Votes: 120 41.5%
  • Local Friend

    Votes: 28 9.7%
  • Reef2Reef

    Votes: 118 40.8%
  • Other

    Votes: 23 8.0%

Online statistics

Members online
2,078
Guests online
4,727
Total visitors
6,805
Use pumps from different brands TOGETHER!
Top