Difficult and Special Care Species List

Discussion in 'Fish Discussion' started by Ike, Nov 29, 2009.

  1. Ike

    Ike Well-Known Member

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    You're very welcome, I'm happy you have found it helpful.
     
  2. Ike

    Ike Well-Known Member

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    Tricky fish, I'd be really curious to know how many people have kept them and Hector's long term (2+ years). For every one that makes it that long, there are probably dozens that die.
     
  3. Ike

    Ike Well-Known Member

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    One of my favorite fish, and one of my first mistakes in the hobby. I haven't tried one since, but sadly have seen many wasting away and dying. They don't seem as commonly collected as they once were, hopefully that's not due to population decreases and is more so due to demand.
     
  4. Reef Fever

    Reef Fever Well-Known Member

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    If they are collected they should only be collected from the marshall islands, any from indo will most certainly die IMO.
     
  5. ca1ore

    ca1ore Well-Known Member CTARS Member

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    Curious where the original posts are sourced from (same as on RC, same poster, different screen name maybe)? Always looking for more references.
     
  6. Ike

    Ike Well-Known Member

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    I just have a different user name on here than I do on RC :)
     
  7. ca1ore

    ca1ore Well-Known Member CTARS Member

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    Oh, right, I see ... Kinda what I figured. Have long found it most useful.
     
  8. soggytees

    soggytees Well-Known Member R2R Supporter Platinum Sponsor

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    Good info! Thanks for sharing! Would you still classify them all the same way as you did in your original post, or have advances in the hobby made some that were "difficult" more manageable?
     
  9. Ike

    Ike Well-Known Member

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    THanks! There would be some minor edits, but most haven't changed much. The only one that really stands out is maybe Tamarin and Leopard Wrasses would move down. Sadly, I still suspect 90+% of these fish are dead within a few months of captivity.
     
    Last edited: May 13, 2015
  10. neuwave

    neuwave Well-Known Member

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    Instead of just mentioning what fish not to have. What about a section tht describes how to overcome the obstacles that come with these fish. Ive had dwarf angels in my reef tanks since the late 90s with minimal coral nipping with the bonus of watching courtship displays. I've noticed some old time reefers stuck in their ways without the thought that something may be possible. I know a couple Local fish stores whose long time employees swear my corals are doomed because presently I have two yellow masked swallowtail angels in my tank. They disregard any ideas or thoughts that are not their own. But overcoming new reefing challenges is exciting for me. So if a new section was created to share experiences and knowledge to benefit fish husbandry.
     
  11. Ike

    Ike Well-Known Member

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    Genicanthus are very different from Centropyge/dawrf angels. So, I'd say your LFS employees are just clueless about Gencanthus angels and their behavior and not just "old time reefers". When it comes to Centropyge angels, it's always a risk that they will nip eventually. There's a mild risk with Genicanthus, but they're more times than not quite safe.

    I agree with you, there could be a lot more info on this list , but it's pretty long as it is so I'm hoping to just keep it as a quick reference guide to hopefully encourage people to do more research should they want to tackle one of the more challenging fish.

    Thanks for the feedback!
     
  12. neuwave

    neuwave Well-Known Member

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    Yeah I don't often go to that LFS . It's a decent store with healthy fish and coral. So no complaints there. Just one of those old school stores that are stuck in their ways. Their way or the highway type of scenario.
    I agree Centropyge angels are more of a challenge but always great when you see people success stories. Learning and adapting those experiences into other people's reefs. Making a shortlist thread into an overcome/success thread. :)
     
  13. TreyC2010

    TreyC2010 Well-Known Member

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    I have 5 Dispar Anthias and I got them before really getting to know their feeding habits. Luckily they accept flakes with their frozen foods and I use an auto feeder. Anthias seemed to be popular and easy when you look on some purchase sites and ask your lfs. Glad mine aren't too picky :)
     
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  14. megisawesome06

    megisawesome06 Well-Known Member

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    Great list! Unfortunately, 90% of my dream tank species are on it! Haha.

    My Lawnmower Blenny has been really good about eating. I was paranoid after reading they starve sometimes. He's been eating algae wafers and some other pellets that sink to the bottom. Maybe I'm lucky!

    Also, I have a Coral Catfish. (The tank we bought recently was already stocked and established and he was in it.) He's amazing to watch. More social than I would have expected. He loves the algae wafers, too! We named him Snape. I love him! (But am still too paranoid to stick my hand in the tank all willy nilly.)
     
  15. megisawesome06

    megisawesome06 Well-Known Member

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    I want a Mandarin "Goby" SO BAD! (Like years down the road after I master the wonder that is my current tank.)

    Has anyone successfully kept them? They're BEAUTIFUL, but I've only heard horror stories.
     
  16. Tahoe61

    Tahoe61 Moderator Staff Member Team R2R R2R Supporter R2R Excellence Award Showcase Editor

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    Sure people keep Mandarins successfully in an established tank. Too new many hobbyist rush into buying one thinking that their tank can support the eating habits of Mandarins and fail because they did not know the specifics.

    Mandarins eat hundreds of Copepods a day, not Amphipods or other commonly found Zooplankton. They can be trained to eat other foods but that takes long term dedication most new hobbyist do not have.

    You can not have other fish out competing the Mandarin for food either.

    Someone is always trying to re-invent the wheel and then think that they alone can push the envelop, well it usually ends badly for the Mandarin.
     
  17. Cleo642

    Cleo642 Well-Known Member

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    I know this is an old post but I almost burst a kidney laughing. It was so funny when you called the fish a jerk.
     
  18. aviationreef

    aviationreef Well-Known Member

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    Plans for my future goal of a fish on this list the mandarin goby.

    Step negative two, Seed 60G cube tank with pods
    Step negative one, Wait 2 months
    Step one, Set up a 20-30 Gallon Display Refugium for my tank.
    Step two, seed both the display refugium and the tank with 2-3 different types of pods.
    Step three, Wait, wait and wait some more. 6 months is my minimum now.
    Step four, Place the beautiful goby i purchased into my Display refugium for a period of time(undecided so far, from my understanding quarantining these fish is a horrible idea.
    Step five, move the goby to the main tank.

    Big question, Would a diamond back goby cause any issues with this? I have had one in my tank for 2 months, I bought my tank used and that guy had it for 6 months so it is healthy, eating and a great fish. Problem is with it sifting sand will it eat some of the population of pods?

    Other fish in the tank mated pair of snowflake clowns and a firefish.
     
  19. eatbreakfast

    eatbreakfast Fish Nerd Staff Member Team R2R R2R Supporter R2R Excellence Award Showcase Editor Expert Contributor

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    In a 60g a diamond goby might present some competition problems for a mandarin. If you watch a mandarin eat, it stops every few inches and picks at pods in the substrate and rocks. The diamond goby will continually deplete the pods in the substrate.

    Also, why put the mandarin in the refugium? The purpose of a refugium is to provide 'refuge" for the pods so they can repopulate the main tank without any predator pressure. Adding a mandarin defeats this purpose.
     
  20. aviationreef

    aviationreef Well-Known Member

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    Someone else said it would be a good idea to keep it alone, kinda like a quarantine. But if you do not agree i will look into going straight to the tank.

    Would the diamond goby eat pods or just happen to get a few when he is sifting the sand?
     

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