Dipping corals in...Bayer Insecticide?

Discussion in 'Bulk Reef Supply' started by randyBRS, Dec 16, 2016.

  1. Scarybo

    Scarybo Well-Known Member Partner Member 2018

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    What mounting evidence? I would like to read and understand. All coral dips are a poison at some level. Would like to see why Bayer is different.
     

  2. tankstudy

    tankstudy Well-Known Member

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    I've tried a pretty good assortment of treatments and none of them are truly 100% coral friendly. I'd be interested in what he is using that has no interference with coral.
     
  3. sk8elenex92

    sk8elenex92 Well-Known Member

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    The only dip I have ever used and never once have I had an issue. I don't even measure the amount of Bayer and just squirt the bottle into the cup. Just make to rinse really well. Used it on every type of coral there.

    Kungpaoshizi I would like to see where you got this info from "It also provokes a resistance in arthropods that is a genetic "switch" which is very real. So those using it for red bugs are just asking for it"
     
  4. Scarybo

    Scarybo Well-Known Member Partner Member 2018

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    I read through the previous thread discussing Bayer and focus on the page 6 #111 post. It detailed the use of DDT/pesticides and developed resistance. I am a layman and not by any sense an expert but I dont see that risk in our hobby due to a few major differences.
    • The pest we are trying to eliminate on corals arent exposed to this pesticide in the wild and allowed time to develop resistance
    • The corals in our tank arent exposed to this toxin for a significant amount of time (no time/ability to develop resistance)
    • Any transmission of pest between hobbyist is incidental and multiple generations have not been exposed to the dip
    The development of resistance as documented is to DDT that is sprayed and left. As a result several generations are exposed to the toxin. Over time nature always wins. Nature adapts and the pest develop resistance. It's similar to the problem we see with antibiotics. In our hobby we dip and rinse. The pest is exposed for a very short time. There should be no residual that would allow the pest to adapt. Is it possible for a coral pest to adapt. I cant say no but I dont see the prolonged exposure and transmission to nature that would allow the evolution/adaption. Again I am not an expert and everything I just posted could be nonsense. Just my humble opinion/observation.
     
  5. randyBRS

    randyBRS BRStv Apprentice :-P R2R Supporter Gold Sponsor

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    We have had good luck finding it there as well :)

    I can absolutely see where you are coming from. We're dealing with a pretty harsh chemical here, so you need to take as many safety precautions as possible.

    Great points, thanks for sharing! That's a great point with the red bugs - assuming there's a fresh genetic strain/population each time it's being treated.
     
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