Freshwater tanks

schneidergarrettt60

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Ok I am hoping I am putting thus in the right area. My wife has 3 freshwater tanks. She is becoming annoyed that the tanks are becoming cloudy and a hazy with a film on top. She has to completely empty the tanks 100 percent water change every week now. This has just started within the last 3 weeks. When I get home I'll test parameters. But does anyone have an idea on how to stop this?
Thanks
 
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Peace River

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The cloudiness could come from many things including a bacteria bloom. The film could be a build up of protein on the surface. Are you currently running a canister filters on the tanks with a film on the surface? This may be able to be broken up and mixed into the tank with surface agitation (airstones, HOB filter, powerhead(s) pointed along the surface, etc.) or a Fluval surface skimmer (that attached to your canister).
 

Peace River

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Does the spill and/or return flow from the AIO or the HOB agitate the surface? If not, you may want to try to lower the water level just a bit.
 

piranhaman00

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Bacterial blooms. Are they in direct sunlight? UV is the quick an easy cheat. The green killing machine is cheap, internal and works for clearing water column.
 
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Karen00

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In my experience adding a bubbler helps for surface agitation. Has anything changed in the tanks (new fish, filters, etc).

I agree that it sounds like a bacterial bloom. I have had this happen from three different situations but both most likely caused an imbalance in my biological filtration because of the increased bioload. Once was when my tank became overstocked when a pair of my fish spawned and I suddenly had a bunch of fry so not only did I have too many fish I also had to feed a lot more. I had to do water changes (about 20%) a couple times a week to keep my parameters in check until I was able to get the fry into their own tank then everything settled down. The other time was when I got some fish that were picky eaters so I was feeding a lot to try and get them to eat but wasn't cleaning up the excess food after (I learned my lesson about that). The other time was when I wasn't cleaning out my filter enough. It was like goopy water in and goopy water out. All of these produced similar effects as yours

None of these might be your situation given it's suddenly happening to three tanks at once but it definitely sounds like a biological filtration issue?

Is it possible setting in your air is suddenly irritating the tanks (like home renos) or has your water changed if you're on city water? I periodically check my city's website to see what the parameters are. Or you changed your fish food? I'm trying to think of things that would affect three tanks at once.
 

Waters

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Are these planted tanks? Does she feed heavy? That is pretty common with freshwater tanks....it is a protein that forms on the surface due to the lower water circulation in freshwater tanks. A surface skimmer works wonders. You can take a paper towel and drag it across the surface which cleans it up.
 

afishbestservedcold

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Are these planted tanks? Does she feed heavy? That is pretty common with freshwater tanks....it is a protein that forms on the surface due to the lower water circulation in freshwater tanks. A surface skimmer works wonders. You can take a paper towel and drag it across the surface which cleans it up.

If they aren't planted, they should be! A high enough ratio of plants-fish and you wont have to do water changes ever (or have any problems at all really, plants are KEY!) - i havent done wcs on my freshwater tanks in 2+years
 
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footgal

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Here are some pictures sorry for the delay been busy..

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Ouch my heart, the gravel... probably bacterial. I started running carbon in mine and it’s doing much better (my water was cloudy). I added more plants and now the water is very clean and nice, surface agitation is key to keeping the top looking nice and clean. I breed the freshwater shrimp, actually a very profitable business and they are very pretty.
EAF38C4F-732F-44A6-A9BD-6AA679D649C2.jpeg 2C8B54EF-DF68-43AE-8310-03F7B50C64F0.jpeg 0F40DC6B-D54A-4461-BDD6-4B1DE9860DAE.jpeg
 

Waters

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Yeah that is definitely bacterial. Will normally take care of itself once everything balances. If you want to speed it up (like overnight), you can pick up a cheap UV unit like the Green Killing Machine which should clear it.
 

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