Fritz Salt Issues?

Reefahholic

Reef Junkie T.V.
View Badges
Joined
Sep 5, 2014
Messages
2,783
Reaction score
2,073
Location
Houston, TX
Zero PO4 = dying corals.

I guess another misattribution to the salt, then. Didn’t watch the video though.
Agreed. I suspected nutrient deficiency from the beginning. If the NO3 comes back zero on that ATI...I’m pretty sure that’s gonna be the cause.

I’ve literally nuked several tanks (with Acro’s) behind starvation due to depleted nutrients and nutrition.
 
Corals.com

Reefahholic

Reef Junkie T.V.
View Badges
Joined
Sep 5, 2014
Messages
2,783
Reaction score
2,073
Location
Houston, TX
From Hanna instruments blog:


Chlorine in Aquatic Systems
Generally, municipal water has a relative chlorine level of 1.5 to 2.0 ppm out of the tap. Chlorine is a strong oxidant and can be lethal to most fish at level between 0.1-0.3 ppm. Although is its best to maintain levels below 0.001 to 0.003 ppm as health issues can arise in aquatic systems. Since chlorine is a great disinfectant, many beneficial bacterial strains in water or biological filter systems may be killed by its presence.

Fish may exhibit symptoms of overexposure to chlorine such as hyper activity, jumping out of the water, lateral recumbence and spasmic movements of the tail, fins or mouth. Chlorine overexposure of levels above 0.3 ppm in fish can also cause difficulties respiring, suffocation or in some cases, death. At a pH range of 6 to 7 hypochlorous acid (HOCl) is more predominant and is the most toxic form. As the water’s pH becomes greater than 7 more hypochlorite (OCl–) ions become present, and are less toxic compared to HOCl.

Chlorine can be removed from water by the use of strong aeration or activated carbon. Aging water will also work to remove chlorine as natural dissipation can occur after 24-48 hours. Sodium thiosulfate easily neutralizes chlorine, but chloramine is generally more difficult to get rid of.

Chloramine can be more difficult to remove compared to chlorine as it is less volatile. Chloramine is more toxic to fish. Water conditioners to detoxify chloramine generally use sodium hydroxymethanesulfonate which breaks apart the chloramine and converts the ammonia to ammonium, a less toxic ionized form.

Much attention is paid by aquarists to detoxify various forms of chlorine with commercial supplements known as water conditioners. Reverse osmosis/de-ionized water is also used to provide pure water samples to aquatic systems. Although these methods are used with relative success, measuring chlorine is still important to make sure that one is not harming their organisms. Sometimes RODI membranes will becomes less effective and water conditioners can expire, resulting in ineffective use. Thus regular monitoring of Chlorine in both the aquatic environment and the water source for your system is best practice.
 

TheHarold

Valuable Member
View Badges
Joined
Oct 3, 2015
Messages
2,931
Reaction score
4,197
From Hanna instruments blog:


Chlorine in Aquatic Systems
Generally, municipal water has a relative chlorine level of 1.5 to 2.0 ppm out of the tap. Chlorine is a strong oxidant and can be lethal to most fish at level between 0.1-0.3 ppm. Although is its best to maintain levels below 0.001 to 0.003 ppm as health issues can arise in aquatic systems. Since chlorine is a great disinfectant, many beneficial bacterial strains in water or biological filter systems may be killed by its presence.

Fish may exhibit symptoms of overexposure to chlorine such as hyper activity, jumping out of the water, lateral recumbence and spasmic movements of the tail, fins or mouth. Chlorine overexposure of levels above 0.3 ppm in fish can also cause difficulties respiring, suffocation or in some cases, death. At a pH range of 6 to 7 hypochlorous acid (HOCl) is more predominant and is the most toxic form. As the water’s pH becomes greater than 7 more hypochlorite (OCl–) ions become present, and are less toxic compared to HOCl.

Chlorine can be removed from water by the use of strong aeration or activated carbon. Aging water will also work to remove chlorine as natural dissipation can occur after 24-48 hours. Sodium thiosulfate easily neutralizes chlorine, but chloramine is generally more difficult to get rid of.

Chloramine can be more difficult to remove compared to chlorine as it is less volatile. Chloramine is more toxic to fish. Water conditioners to detoxify chloramine generally use sodium hydroxymethanesulfonate which breaks apart the chloramine and converts the ammonia to ammonium, a less toxic ionized form.

Much attention is paid by aquarists to detoxify various forms of chlorine with commercial supplements known as water conditioners. Reverse osmosis/de-ionized water is also used to provide pure water samples to aquatic systems. Although these methods are used with relative success, measuring chlorine is still important to make sure that one is not harming their organisms. Sometimes RODI membranes will becomes less effective and water conditioners can expire, resulting in ineffective use. Thus regular monitoring of Chlorine in both the aquatic environment and the water source for your system is best practice.
ICP analysis says 17,000 is normal, in Fiji. I guess that’s PPB though
 

Reefahholic

Reef Junkie T.V.
View Badges
Joined
Sep 5, 2014
Messages
2,783
Reaction score
2,073
Location
Houston, TX

Chlorine

Chlorine (Cl) or Free Chlorine is a halogen chemical element.
In its free form when added to water, it's in fact more correctly called dichlorine or Cl2.
As the chloride ion, which is part of common salt and other compounds, it is abundant in nature and necessary to most forms of life, including humans.
It has a disagreeable suffocating odour and is poisonous.
Chlorine is an important chemical for some processes of water purification, in disinfectants, and in bleach as it is a powerful oxidant.
Chlorine is also used widely in the manufacture of many every-day items, or to purify water in various forms.
  • Used (in the form of hypochlorous acid) to kill bacteria and other microbes from drinking water supplies and swimming pools. However, in most non-commercial swimming pools chlorine itself is not used, but rather the mixture sodium hypochloride, a mixture of sodium and chlorine. Even small water supplies are now routinely chlorinated.
It is this use of chlorine in tap water that brings it into contact with the Aquarium owner.
  • Tap water that has chlorine in it has to be treated with a suitable water conditioner bottle to remove or neutralise this toxic chemical before being added to the aquarium otherwise it will kill your animals.
There are numerous water conditioners on the market, but due to the risk of your water supplier switching to using chloramine without notifying you, it is safer for your aquatic animals if you always use a water conditioner which removes chloramine as well.
  • Note there are some commercial bottles that simply split (or break the bonds of) chloramine into ammonia and chlorine, then remove the chlorine. So these leave the ammonia behind! These products are probably best avoided. See water conditioners for a list.

Contents
[hide]

Chlorine is added to tap water in the form of a gas by your tape water supplier. This forms wikipedia:hypochlorous acid (HOCl). In alkaline water this turn into wikipedia:hypochlorite (OCl) (in acidic water it forms wikipedia:chloric acid), and is the active form of chlorine and exists as a free ion. Therefore it is called 'free chlorine'.


When free chlorine combines with contaminants in the water, such as oils, ammonia or other organic compounds (organic amines) like fish waste, it becomes combined chlorine, or chloramines. Tap water suppliers will deliberately add ammonia and chlorine into tap water so that it becomes chloramine.[1]


This is the measurement of free chlorine and combined chlorine.


Due to chlorine's nature, it is easily removed from tap water by simply letting the water sit in an open bucket for 24 hours and aerating it strongly.
Indeed in the 1970s a lot of Aquarium books at that time would advise that you set up a tank and leave it for 4–5 days without fish to allow the chlorine to disperse. This wouldn't work with chloramine as it take 2 weeks to disappear.
Due to chlorine's far too easy method of removal from tap water, more water suppliers are switching to using chloramine to kill bacteria and microbes in our tap water. So be sure your tap water contains only chlorine if you use this method as your tap water supplier may switch without warning.
 

MnFish1

Valuable Member
View Badges
Joined
Dec 28, 2016
Messages
7,100
Reaction score
7,957
So he has Chlorine in his tap water?
Cl - is indeed chlorine. In tanks its usually in the form of 'Chloride' (i.e. sodium chloride) - I cant see his sodium, other levels - not interested in watching the entire video as its hard to piece all of the chemicals together. If his other 'cations' (like Na) are high - the 'chlorine' being 22000 is likely not a problem. If not - it might be a problem with RO/Chloramine - or something else. I'm sure @Randy Holmes-Farley will weigh in.
 

TheHarold

Valuable Member
View Badges
Joined
Oct 3, 2015
Messages
2,931
Reaction score
4,197
Cl - is indeed chlorine. In tanks its usually in the form of 'Chloride' (i.e. sodium chloride) - I cant see his sodium, other levels - not interested in watching the entire video as its hard to piece all of the chemicals together. If his other 'cations' (like Na) are high - the 'chlorine' being 22000 is likely not a problem. If not - it might be a problem with RO/Chloramine - or something else. I'm sure @Randy Holmes-Farley will weigh in.
I think I am going to send in an ICP test of my pool water, well water, drinking water (filtered), RO water, and RODI water. Just because I am curious how this all works, and they were cheap at MACNA lol.
 
The Random Flow Generator™ Nozzle by VCA
Underwater Creations, Inc.
Top