Is there any reason that a reefer should add multiple species of pods? If so why?

Users Who Are Viewing This Thread (Total: 1, Members: 0, Guests: 1)

Reef By Steele

2500 Club Member
View Badges
Joined
Aug 1, 2023
Messages
2,577
Reaction score
1,990
Location
Kearney
IMG_6646.jpeg

Let’s delve into this question and see if we can come up with a solid answer. First is why do we add pods? The answer to this last question can impact the answer to the first. Is it for live food, algae control, additional Clean-Up Crew (CUC), coral propagation, or increased biome. Any and all of these reasons to have copepods are reasons to have multiple species.

If you want to provide live food for your fish and or corals, then just getting Tigriopus pods should do the trick, after all they are big and easy for your fish to see and hunt. But is it truly enough? By providing your fish with multiple species of pods, you enhance the value of the pods by broadening the nutritional profile. Although pods supply similar nutritional characteristics, each delivers different amounts and types of fatty acids, proteins, and other nutrients. The larger pods are far easier for the fish to target and hunt, which also makes it harder for them to colonize. While the smaller are better targets for certain fish especially Mandrins, Dragonets, and Anthias, and they are more able to colonize as they reside deep in the tiny crevices in the rocks. Although able to hide out of reach, these smaller pods still make themselves available as a tasty treat therefor still providing and nourishing our fish. Plus just as we do not eat the same food for every meal, a varied diet is healthier for our aquatic friends.

Algae control is another top reason that reefers introduce pods to their aquariums. Just as with herbivorous fish, pods too may target certain algae while ignoring others. Different species may also naturally desire certain algae so diversity and variety provide an increased probability for success. Larger pods like Tigriopus are often touted as GHA (Green Hair Algae) mowing machines. Yet I have found that although they often do a great job of reducing the appearance of GHA, often it returns again and again. Smaller copepods, such as Tisbe pods that work clear to the bottom of the crevice or hole, consume the algae all the way to its roots removing the problem, rather than just giving the appearance. Since many of the pods are omnivorous, their consumption of detritus and excess food helps to remove nutrients from the tank, thus providing less food for the algae. Again a variety of pods will eat a variety of items in our tanks increasing our chances of success towards our goals.

Many of us add life to our tanks just to build the biome. More and diverse life in our little glass boxes introduces new and different bacteria and micro fauna creating a more natural environment. These additions help us reefers to develop maturity in our tanks sooner bringing our tanks into a closer reflection of the oceans natural profile. Many of our corals also benefit from actually consuming pods. Copepods like the Acartia who move freely in the water column during their 6 Nauplian stages provide a steady stream of protein and fatty acid rich nutrition for our anemones, zoas and other corals.

The following describes the six copepod species we currently stock and sell and the features and benefits of each.

Tigriopus_californicus copepod is a wonderful addition to any saltwater aquarium as this species of copepods are rich in astaxanthin which helps bring dull colored fish back to their naturally vibrant colors seen in the wild. These bright red colored copepods are larger sized copepods (250-1500 microns) and make an enticing meal to any fish due to their quirky swim pattern, whose erratic, jerky swim pattern combined with their color and size. We highly recommend these pods for reefers who keep fish with high metabolisms allowing them to forage all day long, and are an excellent choice for finicky fish. Having a live food source will also help to lower nutrients often caused by over feeding prepared foods that sink to the substrate and start to decay in your tank.
In sum, the Harpacticidea copepod Tigriopus californicus is an excellent addition to any tanks micro fauna. Providing optimum clean up capabilities combined with a ready food source. As we Huskers like to shout "go big red!"

IMG_6645.jpeg


Apocyclops_pananmensis pods are opportunistic feeders eating phytoplankton, fish waste, and other detritus in your tank. This makes them a critical part of any clean-up crew. As juveniles, Apocyclops copepods are benthic meaning they stay hidden in the rockwork, macroalgae, and glass in your aquarium. As they progress through their life cycle they become pelagic meaning they are free swimming. These life cycle changes makes them an excellent addition to aquariums with “pod hunters” as Mandarins will hunt them from the rocks and wrasses and anthias will benefit from them in the water column.
In sum, the cyclopoid copepod Apocyclops panamensis is an excellent addition to any population of microcrustaceans. Resilient and fast-growing, they are likely to colonize your aquarium and play an important role in removing unsightly algal films over the aquarium substrate and provide a constant food source.

Tisbe_biminiensis are small copepods that tend to inhabit the cracks and crevasses of live rock and macroalgae. These pods can maintain their population in your aquarium as they tend to hide in your rock work where you might see your Mandarin Dragonet hovering like a brightly colored fairy pecking at them as it constantly grazes for food. Being nocturnal in nature helps them maintain a sustainable food source in your tank, yet they still provide a highly nutritious snack or meal for your fish. Tisbe biminiensis also assist with Clean-up by consuming nuisance algae in your aquarium and refugium.
Tisbe biminiensis is a harpacticoid copepod. Thus, as an adult, it lives on the seafloor. Because it spends most of its adult days crawling around on the rock, sand and glass surfaces, it feeds primarily on detritus and algal films. Juveniles, on the other hand, inhabit the open water column where they graze on phytoplankton. We highly recommend dosing Phyto Buffet to provide for their nutritional need, and it aids in establishing colonization.
In sum, the Harpacticidea copepod Tisbe biminiensis is an excellent addition to any tanks micro fauna. providing optimum clean up capabilities in those hard to impossible to reach areas.

Parvocalanus_crassirostris is a calanoid copepod in the family Paracalanidae and are small pelagic (free swimming) copepods rich in fatty acids providing awesome nutrition to larval fish and our Mandarin dragonets. They are also a favorite of filter feeders such as feather dusters, clams, christmas tree worms, sps corals, sponges and of course Zoas. Parvocalanus crassirostris can be found throughout the tropical and subtropical Atlantic. In contrast to harpacticoid copepods, such as Tigriopus californicus and Tisbe biminiensis, calanoid copepods do not crawl on surfaces and into rockwork. Do to living in the open ocean Parvocalanus crassirostris is capable of incredible locomotion, far more active than our other pods. This copepod jumps a multitude of its own body length with each burst! This species will perform daily migrations up and down the water column in search of live micro algae. Their natural food source is live planktonic microalgae and it is absolutely necessary for their survival. Unlike other copepod species in the reef aquarium hobby, this species cannot utilize biofilms and detritus. It must be fed a diet of lipid-rich, live microalgae such as Isochrysis galbana, Rhodomonas salina or Talassiosira weissflogii. Though this dietary need presents a unique challenge, our Phyto Buffet includes 6 strains of phytoplankton rich in HUVA and lipids. Parvocalanus crassirostris is the Ferarri of copepods: it requires rocket fuel, for the ultimate performance.

Parvocalanus crassirostris are herbivores and eat live micro algae and phytoplankton only.

Acartia_tonsa are larger pelagic (free swimming) copepods providing awesome nutrition to a host of fish such as Wrasses, Anthias, Seahorses, and of course our Mandarin dragonets. Originating from the indo-pacific regions, but now found worldwide, they make welcome addition to our fish sourced from the indo-pacific. They breed year round in temperate waters so should colonize nicely in our reef tanks. They also provide an ideal nutritional profile for both photosynthetic and non-photosynthetic corals.
Acartia Tonsa are detrivores and eat micro algae and phytoplankton, uneaten fish food and fish waste making them another valuable member of our clean-up crew.

Psuedodiamptomus_pelagicus are the largest pelagic (free swimming) copepods of our three new additions so while still providing awesome nutrition high in omega fatty acid and lipids to a host of fish such as Wrasses, Athias, Seahorses, I consider these to be the best copepods for our Mandarin dragonets. They are also a great choice for breeders whose larval fish continues to need live foods past the first few days.
Psuedodiamptomus pelagicus are detrivores and eat micro algae and phytoplankton, uneaten fish food and fish waste making them another valuable member of our clean-up crew.

We highly recommend dosing Phyto Buffet to provide for their nutritional needs, and it aids in establishing colonization.

BENEFITS OF PODS IN YOUR AQUARIUM: The primary benefits include FOOD SOURCE, CLEAN UP CREW (CUC) and BIOME DIVERSITY. Copepods aid in the husbandry of certain aquarium inhabitants which require an endless food source as their metabolism requires them to hunt non-stop. These include but not limited to Mandarin Dragonets like our beloved Rainbow Wish and Paisley, other dragonets such as HUSKER our Ruby Red Dragonet (Can’t live in the Cornhusker state and have a red and yellow fish and not name it after your team lol) plus pipefish, seahorses, anthias, various gobies such as sleeper, sand sifting, etc. Copepods also provide a consistent and viable food source for many different captive bred fry. Plus as an added bonus almost all if not all of your fish in your aquarium BENEFIT as they munch on these protein and fatty acid enriched treats. Copepods are a valuable member of your clean-up crew. They aide in Algae control due to pods small size, they can get into the tiniest of crevices and clean the algae down to its roots and help reduce the formation by reducing nutrients in your aquarium. They aide nutrient export by consuming bacteria, detritus and uneaten food and converting it to protein and fatty acids for our fish. Copepods add to an increased biome when colonies of different species establish colonies with in our aquariums.

PLEASE NOTE: Reef By Steele ships all pods in all life stages. Our Pods contains a range of juvenile to adult copepods. Some juvenile copepods are difficult-to-impossible to see with the naked eye upon

Check out our Copepod selections here.

 
Last edited:

FernBluffReef

Active Member
View Badges
Joined
Sep 1, 2023
Messages
102
Reaction score
60
Location
Washington
Here’s a question for you. LFS sells some 8oz single variety pods that they keep cool and are labeled for storage for ~30 days if kept cool but not refrigerated. They sell several varieties. Supposedly there is some food for the pods in the bag etc. Obviously best if added as soon as possible.

Now to my question. If I only need say 8oz for the smaller tank I’m just now seeding. Does it make sense to just order 8oz from you and expect the higher shipping costs or does it make any sense to order a larger quantity from you for a couple servings to seed the tank / feed the critters over a bit of time. Keeping the pods cool but not cold. Said another way are your packaged so they can be stored for a while?

Reefing 22 years ago, coming back a couple months ago was so much simpler to get started Add fresh Fiji live rock and all this was just there. :)
 
Last edited:
OP
OP
Reef By Steele

Reef By Steele

2500 Club Member
View Badges
Joined
Aug 1, 2023
Messages
2,577
Reaction score
1,990
Location
Kearney
I agree that setting up a tank in the days of ocean collected live rock was easier and rewarding with all the hitchhikers that came along. I did the same thing and returned to the hobby in 2021.

As to your question on buying larger and storing, I personally do not see the benefit in storing. If you are planning to put more in at a later time, starting with a higher amount to begin with should lead to establishing them in your tank and possibly not having to add again. Much if this relies on good water quality and food sources for the pods.

My favorite LFS let me place my pods in their store, but I believe the owner was relying on an individual in the store who wasn’t all that interested in my product because he had started culturing Apocyclops in store and I think it stepped in his toes a little. Long story short, the owner was too busy to focus on this and I had just had a surgery so was relying on info from him to make it work which I didn’t get. I went and picked up what was left and the fridge I bought for them after they had been there over 6 weeks. There were still pods alive, but not in the numbers they originally had, and I’m sure some species were gone totally.

As for the 6 Oz bottles in the LFS, while they are a good product, at $26 I believe that our blends have a lot more to offer than a single species. If you were to want to order pods to store and dose over time, PM me and I will sieve out some of the water from yours and supplement it with live phyto to extend their shelf life. I would recommend our blended pods for this, but we should substitute to a special blend as the Apocyclops do not handle the colder water. Adding Acartia in place of them would probably be best. Even though Acartia originated in warmer climates, do probably to being transported in the hills of ships, they are now found all over including arctic regions. They do not breed well in colder areas, but they breed year round in the temperatures most of us keep our reefs at.
At $22 for a 16 Oz blend, add a 16 Oz phyto for $15 and the shipping is free. We just added the combos to our website so instead of $37 that combination is only $32 so you would be getting much greater diversity and live phytoplankton for only $6 more delivered to your door.
 

FernBluffReef

Active Member
View Badges
Joined
Sep 1, 2023
Messages
102
Reaction score
60
Location
Washington
I agree that setting up a tank in the days of ocean collected live rock was easier and rewarding with all the hitchhikers that came along. I did the same thing and returned to the hobby in 2021.

As to your question on buying larger and storing, I personally do not see the benefit in storing. If you are planning to put more in at a later time, starting with a higher amount to begin with should lead to establishing them in your tank and possibly not having to add again. Much if this relies on good water quality and food sources for the pods.

My favorite LFS let me place my pods in their store, but I believe the owner was relying on an individual in the store who wasn’t all that interested in my product because he had started culturing Apocyclops in store and I think it stepped in his toes a little. Long story short, the owner was too busy to focus on this and I had just had a surgery so was relying on info from him to make it work which I didn’t get. I went and picked up what was left and the fridge I bought for them after they had been there over 6 weeks. There were still pods alive, but not in the numbers they originally had, and I’m sure some species were gone totally.

As for the 6 Oz bottles in the LFS, while they are a good product, at $26 I believe that our blends have a lot more to offer than a single species. If you were to want to order pods to store and dose over time, PM me and I will sieve out some of the water from yours and supplement it with live phyto to extend their shelf life. I would recommend our blended pods for this, but we should substitute to a special blend as the Apocyclops do not handle the colder water. Adding Acartia in place of them would probably be best. Even though Acartia originated in warmer climates, do probably to being transported in the hills of ships, they are now found all over including arctic regions. They do not breed well in colder areas, but they breed year round in the temperatures most of us keep our reefs at.
At $22 for a 16 Oz blend, add a 16 Oz phyto for $15 and the shipping is free. We just added the combos to our website so instead of $37 that combination is only $32 so you would be getting much greater diversity and live phytoplankton for only $6 more delivered to your door.
Awesome reply thanks. My main display should receive its first finned residents starting next week. So in 2–3 weeks I’ll do as you suggest, order extra from you and just dump them all in and see if they do their thing. Water quality isn’t a significant worry, food of course is.

Thanks again for the great suggestions and for being here to support us reefers both old and new.
 

niccumec

Community Member
View Badges
Joined
Aug 3, 2023
Messages
43
Reaction score
10
Location
Austin, TX
Great article. Still in the build stage of my system. Obviously, I need to get the tank established for a few weeks before adding, but once established, do you seed the main display tank or refugium (or both).
 
OP
OP
Reef By Steele

Reef By Steele

2500 Club Member
View Badges
Joined
Aug 1, 2023
Messages
2,577
Reaction score
1,990
Location
Kearney
Great article. Still in the build stage of my system. Obviously, I need to get the tank established for a few weeks before adding, but once established, do you seed the main display tank or refugium (or both).
On a new system, I would definitely seed the main tank. As for the refugium, it would depend on how you are setting it up. If you are putting rubble and or “mud” I definitely would seed it as well. If just growing a macro algae like Cheato, then I would dose it once the macro is growing good. If there isn’t and substance for them to live in they might struggle in the refugium. That being said, on a new build, adding pods as soon as the cycle is complete, can really assist with avoiding the ugly phase, plus if nourished, there is a pretty good chance that you can at least start to get the pods established and colonizing by adding them prior to having a fish to prey on them. Dosing phytoplankton would ensure they have a food source and will also aide but consuming silicates to avoid diatoms, as long as it is a live silicate and contains a diatom like Thalassiosira Weissflogii. Our blend has 3 diatoms in the 10 strains.
 
OP
OP
Reef By Steele

Reef By Steele

2500 Club Member
View Badges
Joined
Aug 1, 2023
Messages
2,577
Reaction score
1,990
Location
Kearney
Awesome reply thanks. My main display should receive its first finned residents starting next week. So in 2–3 weeks I’ll do as you suggest, order extra from you and just dump them all in and see if they do their thing. Water quality isn’t a significant worry, food of course is.

Thanks again for the great suggestions and for being here to support us reefers both old and new.
Are you fish in cycling or is your tank cycled? I ask this because you can add pods as soon as your tank is cycled, and adding before you have a lot of predators can increase you success on establishing colonies up front. Also they are great at combating the ugly stage. I didn’t know all of this when I started up my new tanks, but because I wanted mandarins and didn’t want to wait a year or more, I added pods right away and in those two start ups I barely has an ugly phase. Thought I got lucky or I was just really good at this from my previous experience lol. My next two tanks were planned for larger predators and fish so I didn’t add pods (because they are only needed for mandarins) and I fought those tanks all the way. Wasn’t until I started culturing pods that I really started studying them and that is when I found out all the benefits and started selling them under my personal account @HankstankXXL750. You can check out my threads over there fighting turf algae in the XXL750. @Ocean_Queenie (my wife) and I decided to go with a name and develop this professionally when we decided to become sponsors. “Hanks Tank” is the 750 named after her Sunset Wrasse, and Queenie is her Panther Grouper. Yes we name our fish.
 

FernBluffReef

Active Member
View Badges
Joined
Sep 1, 2023
Messages
102
Reaction score
60
Location
Washington
Are you fish in cycling or is your tank cycled? I ask this because you can add pods as soon as your tank is cycled, and adding before you have a lot of predators can increase you success on establishing colonies up front. Also they are great at combating the ugly stage. I didn’t know all of this when I started up my new tanks, but because I wanted mandarins and didn’t want to wait a year or more, I added pods right away and in those two start ups I barely has an ugly phase. Thought I got lucky or I was just really good at this from my previous experience lol. My next two tanks were planned for larger predators and fish so I didn’t add pods (because they are only needed for mandarins) and I fought those tanks all the way. Wasn’t until I started culturing pods that I really started studying them and that is when I found out all the benefits and started selling them under my personal account @HankstankXXL750. You can check out my threads over there fighting turf algae in the XXL750. @Ocean_Queenie (my wife) and I decided to go with a name and develop this professionally when we decided to become sponsors. “Hanks Tank” is the 750 named after her Sunset Wrasse, and Queenie is her Panther Grouper. Yes we name our fish.
 

FernBluffReef

Active Member
View Badges
Joined
Sep 1, 2023
Messages
102
Reaction score
60
Location
Washington
Fishless with RedSea mature. Probably not the best choice but is what I had ordered (discovered intended for use with live rock). In the other tank I found the cycle really didn’t complete until a week or so after adding fish. Its had and still has some diatoms at this point but nothing real ugly “yet”. (About 5 weeks young, with half a dozen fish and a few corals at this point). I added the store bought pods I mentioned about two weeks ago but I don’t think many survived or were alive in the first place (I thought they were fresh when I got them, didn’t realize they could be stored and upon reading the label found they were packaged 5 weeks prior to my purchase - I could see some movement but not much hence my questions around storing). Anyway they haven’t made any noticeable difference in that tank and I’ve not seen any since adding so I think very few survived and I intend to redose that tank when I seed the main display.

Like you mentioned I want to add pods to my main display when it is cycled. I hope to transfer some fish from my smaller tank where they have been monitored this weekend / next week and then ordering pods after the holiday so the tank can finish cycle and to avoid potential shipping delays . And yes I want them for Mandrians. We enjoyed our fat Madrians in the prior tank. We currently have a little yellow clown goby that is quite entertaining that could benefit from today.

With that how much do I order / formula for ordering pods to seed a new tank? Office/Observation tank is 33g display / 42g total volume. Main display is 112g display / 143g total
 
Last edited:
OP
OP
Reef By Steele

Reef By Steele

2500 Club Member
View Badges
Joined
Aug 1, 2023
Messages
2,577
Reaction score
1,990
Location
Kearney
Yes, I looked at your build thread. My first larger tank when I got back in was a fist gen 525 so know the tank. As for how much to add, there are three considerations.

The first is budget!!!
The second (but IMO) how successful do you want to be.
And third the amount of predators (mandarins, the clown goby, sand sifting gobies, wrasses not so much the fairies but leopards etc and anthias).

I recommend dosing minimum of 1 ml of phyto for every actual gallon of water in tank per day, 2 ml when you are heavier stocked with corals and 3 ml if doing filter feeders like clams, Christmas tree worms and gorgonia etc. pelts assume 115 gallons in 525 and 30 gallons in other. So for phyto you would need approximately 150 Oz or 1 gallon plus 1 32 Oz per month.

I recommend 1/2 gallon pods for 75-125 gallon tanks and 1 gallon for 125-270.
With it being a young tank, I would probably order the 1/2 gallon and split between the two tanks and get a gallon of phyto. That would run $117.25.
If your budget doesn’t allow then cut it in half, 32 Oz pods and 1/2 gallon phyto $70.50 some is definitely better than none.
If your budget isn’t stretched so the gallon of each for $182.25. Had a lady on here order that for a 90 and she came back and replied that they were covering her glass the following morning.

I priced out the blended as they are the lowest price, the premium and titanic have rotifers added, but that would be more beneficial if your corals were up and running the colossal has all 6 so that could benefit you as well, but definitely need to dose phyto with them as the parvo pods will only eat the brown phyto. Should dose it with any pods as it greatly increased their nutritional value as 6 if my ohyto cultures are heavy un HUFA.
 

FernBluffReef

Active Member
View Badges
Joined
Sep 1, 2023
Messages
102
Reaction score
60
Location
Washington
Figured I'd give an update.

Received my 1/2 gallon of Pods on 11/17 to seed the tanks. It was freezing out but I was home when arrived hence they did not sit out in the cold. Put the pod container in sump for a couple hours before nightfall to acclimate. I could see a few pods active but not a lot of activity. Per some other guidance I had seen, I slowly added saltwater to the pods over an hour or so to acclimate like other invertebrates to increase survival rate and then dosed 2/3rd pods to the RS 525 and 1/3 to pods the RS170 roughly splitting between the displays and sumps after the lights went out - skimmer off for the night. Been dosing about 80-100ml of phyto to the RS 525 since and 50-70ml of phyto to the RS170 since, phyto stored in chilled section of fridge at ~35 degrees.

Dosing seems to be causing a substantial bloom in the 525 of what looks bacterial and as newly cycled not all that surprising but something the RS170 did not really go thru when it was cycled a few weeks before without pods and without dosing phyto. The water in RS170 is clear with some cloudiness towards the end of day but crystal clear in the AM. On the other hand, I now have to clean the RS170 glass 2-3 times a day vs. once every day or two. Corals in the RS170 seem really happy - wide open and taking it all in. Water in cabinet/sump smells more than usual, and will be adding carbon tomorrow after scheduled ~10% water change.

No visible evidence of any copepods in the sump after a week of dosing photo and as such I'm going to reduce the use of phyto starting tomorrow so I can have clearer water given pods don't seem to have survived. As said the corals seem to love it so the RS170 will probably get about 1/2 of what it is getting now so say 30ml and probably will cut the RS525 way back to let the bloom settle down.

Will try adding more pods after tanks have had a chance to mature further. I know BRS and others recommend adding pods early / cycling with pods to help beat diatoms. I'm not seeing all that much benefit but will continue to acquire more pods in the end to seed the tank over time as we want Mandrians in both tanks.
 
Last edited:
OP
OP
Reef By Steele

Reef By Steele

2500 Club Member
View Badges
Joined
Aug 1, 2023
Messages
2,577
Reaction score
1,990
Location
Kearney
Figured I'd give an update.

Received my 1/2 gallon of Pods on 11/17 to seed the tanks. It was freezing out but I was home when arrived hence they did not sit out in the cold. Put the pod container in sump for a couple hours before nightfall to acclimate. I could see a few pods active but not a lot of activity. Per some other guidance I had seen, I slowly added saltwater to the pods over an hour or so to acclimate like other invertebrates to increase survival rate and then dosed 2/3rd pods to the RS 525 and 1/3 to pods the RS170 roughly splitting between the displays and sumps after the lights went out - skimmer off for the night. Been dosing about 80-100ml of phyto to the RS 525 since and 50-70ml of phyto to the RS170 since, phyto stored in chilled section of fridge at ~35 degrees.

Dosing seems to be causing a substantial bloom in the 525 of what looks bacterial and as newly cycled not all that surprising but something the RS170 did not go thru when it was cycled a few weeks before without pods and without dosing phyto. The water in RS170 is staying relatively clear with some noticeable cloudiness towards the end of day but crystal clear in the AM. On the other hand, now have to clean the RS170 glass ~3 times a day vs. once ever other day. Corals in the RS170 seem quite happy - wide open and taking it all in. Water in tanks smells more than usual, and will be adding carbon tomorrow after scheduled ~10% water change

No visible evidence of any copepods in the sump after a week and as such I'm going to reduce the use of phyto starting tomorrow so I can have clearer water given pods don't seem to have survived. As said the corals seem to love it so the RS170 will probably get about 1/2 of what it was getting @ say 30ml and probably will cut the RS525 way back to a similar amount to let the bloom settle down.

Will try again adding more pods after tanks have had a chance to mature further. I know BRS and others recommend adding pods early. I'm not seeing all that much benefit but will continue to acquire more to seed the tank over time as we want Mandrians in both tanks.
Hey, I am sorry that you think the pods were not active. I wish you had reached out right away as we have an arrive alive guarantee. I had another customer from that shipment email me that they arrived dead, but when he shined a light up from the bottom he responded back that there was a lot of activity in the bottle. Sorry I don’t remember where you are located, but I wasn’t aware that we had many areas that were at risk of freezing temps, I look at the weather app trying to anticipate weather related issues. You state no visible sign of pods in the sump. How are you looking for them? Best way to determine if there are pods is to shine a light through the glass for a period of time when the tank is dark. If there are pods, they should come out and be visible on the glass.

What type of smell are you experiencing from the water? As to dosing, cutting back to 30 ml, I’m not sure if there was a miscommunication, but the 525 ought to be around 110 gallons which our recommendation is 1-3 ml per gallon actual volume. So max would be 30-33 ml in the 525 and the 170 should be less. How many ml were you dosing per day?
 

CoralB

5000 Club Member
View Badges
Joined
Mar 20, 2021
Messages
6,162
Reaction score
31,371
Location
Orlando, Florida
IMG_6646.jpeg

Let’s delve into this question and see if we can come up with a solid answer. First is why do we add pods? The answer to this last question can impact the answer to the first. Is it for live food, algae control, additional Clean-Up Crew (CUC), coral propagation, or increased biome. Any and all of these reasons to have copepods are reasons to have multiple species.

If you want to provide live food for your fish and or corals, then just getting Tigriopus pods should do the trick, after all they are big and easy for your fish to see and hunt. But is it truly enough? By providing your fish with multiple species of pods, you enhance the value of the pods by broadening the nutritional profile. Although pods supply similar nutritional characteristics, each delivers different amounts and types of fatty acids, proteins, and other nutrients. The larger pods are far easier for the fish to target and hunt, which also makes it harder for them to colonize. While the smaller are better targets for certain fish especially Mandrins, Dragonets, and Anthias, and they are more able to colonize as they reside deep in the tiny crevices in the rocks. Although able to hide out of reach, these smaller pods still make themselves available as a tasty treat therefor still providing and nourishing our fish. Plus just as we do not eat the same food for every meal, a varied diet is healthier for our aquatic friends.

Algae control is another top reason that reefers introduce pods to their aquariums. Just as with herbivorous fish, pods too may target certain algae while ignoring others. Different species may also naturally desire certain algae so diversity and variety provide an increased probability for success. Larger pods like Tigriopus are often touted as GHA (Green Hair Algae) mowing machines. Yet I have found that although they often do a great job of reducing the appearance of GHA, often it returns again and again. Smaller copepods, such as Tisbe pods that work clear to the bottom of the crevice or hole, consume the algae all the way to its roots removing the problem, rather than just giving the appearance. Since many of the pods are omnivorous, their consumption of detritus and excess food helps to remove nutrients from the tank, thus providing less food for the algae. Again a variety of pods will eat a variety of items in our tanks increasing our chances of success towards our goals.

Many of us add life to our tanks just to build the biome. More and diverse life in our little glass boxes introduces new and different bacteria and micro fauna creating a more natural environment. These additions help us reefers to develop maturity in our tanks sooner bringing our tanks into a closer reflection of the oceans natural profile. Many of our corals also benefit from actually consuming pods. Copepods like the Acartia who move freely in the water column during their 6 Nauplian stages provide a steady stream of protein and fatty acid rich nutrition for our anemones, zoas and other corals.

The following describes the six copepod species we currently stock and sell and the features and benefits of each.

Tigriopus_californicus copepod is a wonderful addition to any saltwater aquarium as this species of copepods are rich in astaxanthin which helps bring dull colored fish back to their naturally vibrant colors seen in the wild. These bright red colored copepods are larger sized copepods (250-1500 microns) and make an enticing meal to any fish due to their quirky swim pattern, whose erratic, jerky swim pattern combined with their color and size. We highly recommend these pods for reefers who keep fish with high metabolisms allowing them to forage all day long, and are an excellent choice for finicky fish. Having a live food source will also help to lower nutrients often caused by over feeding prepared foods that sink to the substrate and start to decay in your tank.
In sum, the Harpacticidea copepod Tigriopus californicus is an excellent addition to any tanks micro fauna. Providing optimum clean up capabilities combined with a ready food source. As we Huskers like to shout "go big red!"

IMG_6645.jpeg


Apocyclops_pananmensis pods are opportunistic feeders eating phytoplankton, fish waste, and other detritus in your tank. This makes them a critical part of any clean-up crew. As juveniles, Apocyclops copepods are benthic meaning they stay hidden in the rockwork, macroalgae, and glass in your aquarium. As they progress through their life cycle they become pelagic meaning they are free swimming. These life cycle changes makes them an excellent addition to aquariums with “pod hunters” as Mandarins will hunt them from the rocks and wrasses and anthias will benefit from them in the water column.
In sum, the cyclopoid copepod Apocyclops panamensis is an excellent addition to any population of microcrustaceans. Resilient and fast-growing, they are likely to colonize your aquarium and play an important role in removing unsightly algal films over the aquarium substrate and provide a constant food source.

Tisbe_biminiensis are small copepods that tend to inhabit the cracks and crevasses of live rock and macroalgae. These pods can maintain their population in your aquarium as they tend to hide in your rock work where you might see your Mandarin Dragonet hovering like a brightly colored fairy pecking at them as it constantly grazes for food. Being nocturnal in nature helps them maintain a sustainable food source in your tank, yet they still provide a highly nutritious snack or meal for your fish. Tisbe biminiensis also assist with Clean-up by consuming nuisance algae in your aquarium and refugium.
Tisbe biminiensis is a harpacticoid copepod. Thus, as an adult, it lives on the seafloor. Because it spends most of its adult days crawling around on the rock, sand and glass surfaces, it feeds primarily on detritus and algal films. Juveniles, on the other hand, inhabit the open water column where they graze on phytoplankton. We highly recommend dosing Phyto Buffet to provide for their nutritional need, and it aids in establishing colonization.
In sum, the Harpacticidea copepod Tisbe biminiensis is an excellent addition to any tanks micro fauna. providing optimum clean up capabilities in those hard to impossible to reach areas.

Parvocalanus_crassirostris is a calanoid copepod in the family Paracalanidae and are small pelagic (free swimming) copepods rich in fatty acids providing awesome nutrition to larval fish and our Mandarin dragonets. They are also a favorite of filter feeders such as feather dusters, clams, christmas tree worms, sps corals, sponges and of course Zoas. Parvocalanus crassirostris can be found throughout the tropical and subtropical Atlantic. In contrast to harpacticoid copepods, such as Tigriopus californicus and Tisbe biminiensis, calanoid copepods do not crawl on surfaces and into rockwork. Do to living in the open ocean Parvocalanus crassirostris is capable of incredible locomotion, far more active than our other pods. This copepod jumps a multitude of its own body length with each burst! This species will perform daily migrations up and down the water column in search of live micro algae. Their natural food source is live planktonic microalgae and it is absolutely necessary for their survival. Unlike other copepod species in the reef aquarium hobby, this species cannot utilize biofilms and detritus. It must be fed a diet of lipid-rich, live microalgae such as Isochrysis galbana, Rhodomonas salina or Talassiosira weissflogii. Though this dietary need presents a unique challenge, our Phyto Buffet includes 6 strains of phytoplankton rich in HUVA and lipids. Parvocalanus crassirostris is the Ferarri of copepods: it requires rocket fuel, for the ultimate performance.

Parvocalanus crassirostris are herbivores and eat live micro algae and phytoplankton only.

Acartia_tonsa are larger pelagic (free swimming) copepods providing awesome nutrition to a host of fish such as Wrasses, Anthias, Seahorses, and of course our Mandarin dragonets. Originating from the indo-pacific regions, but now found worldwide, they make welcome addition to our fish sourced from the indo-pacific. They breed year round in temperate waters so should colonize nicely in our reef tanks. They also provide an ideal nutritional profile for both photosynthetic and non-photosynthetic corals.
Acartia Tonsa are detrivores and eat micro algae and phytoplankton, uneaten fish food and fish waste making them another valuable member of our clean-up crew.

Psuedodiamptomus_pelagicus are the largest pelagic (free swimming) copepods of our three new additions so while still providing awesome nutrition high in omega fatty acid and lipids to a host of fish such as Wrasses, Athias, Seahorses, I consider these to be the best copepods for our Mandarin dragonets. They are also a great choice for breeders whose larval fish continues to need live foods past the first few days.
Psuedodiamptomus pelagicus are detrivores and eat micro algae and phytoplankton, uneaten fish food and fish waste making them another valuable member of our clean-up crew.

We highly recommend dosing Phyto Buffet to provide for their nutritional needs, and it aids in establishing colonization.

BENEFITS OF PODS IN YOUR AQUARIUM: The primary benefits include FOOD SOURCE, CLEAN UP CREW (CUC) and BIOME DIVERSITY. Copepods aid in the husbandry of certain aquarium inhabitants which require an endless food source as their metabolism requires them to hunt non-stop. These include but not limited to Mandarin Dragonets like our beloved Rainbow Wish and Paisley, other dragonets such as HUSKER our Ruby Red Dragonet (Can’t live in the Cornhusker state and have a red and yellow fish and not name it after your team lol) plus pipefish, seahorses, anthias, various gobies such as sleeper, sand sifting, etc. Copepods also provide a consistent and viable food source for many different captive bred fry. Plus as an added bonus almost all if not all of your fish in your aquarium BENEFIT as they munch on these protein and fatty acid enriched treats. Copepods are a valuable member of your clean-up crew. They aide in Algae control due to pods small size, they can get into the tiniest of crevices and clean the algae down to its roots and help reduce the formation by reducing nutrients in your aquarium. They aide nutrient export by consuming bacteria, detritus and uneaten food and converting it to protein and fatty acids for our fish. Copepods add to an increased biome when colonies of different species establish colonies with in our aquariums.

PLEASE NOTE: Reef By Steele ships all pods in all life stages. Our Pods contains a range of juvenile to adult copepods. Some juvenile copepods are difficult-to-impossible to see with the naked eye upon

Check out our Copepod selections here.

WOW !! Thank goodness there wasn’t a test at the end . Whew !! . Don’t over think this as when you go to a restaurant do you ask the waiter why their are more than one entree?? . No I’m sure you don’t and I for one am thankful for multiple choices on the desert menu . So wait was there a question ? Now I’m hungry ! . :beaming-face-with-smiling-eyes:

Nice topic !!
 
OP
OP
Reef By Steele

Reef By Steele

2500 Club Member
View Badges
Joined
Aug 1, 2023
Messages
2,577
Reaction score
1,990
Location
Kearney
WOW !! Thank goodness there wasn’t a test at the end . Whew !! . Don’t over think this as when you go to a restaurant do you ask the waiter why their are more than one entree?? . No I’m sure you don’t and I for one am thankful for multiple choices on the desert menu . So wait was there a question ? Now I’m hungry ! . :beaming-face-with-smiling-eyes:

Nice topic !!
Haha. I love the menu analogy. No test, just FOOD for thought lol. I believe that many newer reefers don’t realize the benefits to pods in their reef and a diverse biome. So just a “little” post to generate conversation. Oh by the way, my wife @Ocean_Queenie thinks I might talk too much. I’m sure she is mistaken.
 

Harpo

Coral Junkie
View Badges
Joined
Jan 7, 2009
Messages
526
Reaction score
197
Location
Royal Oak, Mi
IMG_6646.jpeg

Let’s delve into this question and see if we can come up with a solid answer. First is why do we add pods? The answer to this last question can impact the answer to the first. Is it for live food, algae control, additional Clean-Up Crew (CUC), coral propagation, or increased biome. Any and all of these reasons to have copepods are reasons to have multiple species.

If you want to provide live food for your fish and or corals, then just getting Tigriopus pods should do the trick, after all they are big and easy for your fish to see and hunt. But is it truly enough? By providing your fish with multiple species of pods, you enhance the value of the pods by broadening the nutritional profile. Although pods supply similar nutritional characteristics, each delivers different amounts and types of fatty acids, proteins, and other nutrients. The larger pods are far easier for the fish to target and hunt, which also makes it harder for them to colonize. While the smaller are better targets for certain fish especially Mandrins, Dragonets, and Anthias, and they are more able to colonize as they reside deep in the tiny crevices in the rocks. Although able to hide out of reach, these smaller pods still make themselves available as a tasty treat therefor still providing and nourishing our fish. Plus just as we do not eat the same food for every meal, a varied diet is healthier for our aquatic friends.

Algae control is another top reason that reefers introduce pods to their aquariums. Just as with herbivorous fish, pods too may target certain algae while ignoring others. Different species may also naturally desire certain algae so diversity and variety provide an increased probability for success. Larger pods like Tigriopus are often touted as GHA (Green Hair Algae) mowing machines. Yet I have found that although they often do a great job of reducing the appearance of GHA, often it returns again and again. Smaller copepods, such as Tisbe pods that work clear to the bottom of the crevice or hole, consume the algae all the way to its roots removing the problem, rather than just giving the appearance. Since many of the pods are omnivorous, their consumption of detritus and excess food helps to remove nutrients from the tank, thus providing less food for the algae. Again a variety of pods will eat a variety of items in our tanks increasing our chances of success towards our goals.

Many of us add life to our tanks just to build the biome. More and diverse life in our little glass boxes introduces new and different bacteria and micro fauna creating a more natural environment. These additions help us reefers to develop maturity in our tanks sooner bringing our tanks into a closer reflection of the oceans natural profile. Many of our corals also benefit from actually consuming pods. Copepods like the Acartia who move freely in the water column during their 6 Nauplian stages provide a steady stream of protein and fatty acid rich nutrition for our anemones, zoas and other corals.

The following describes the six copepod species we currently stock and sell and the features and benefits of each.

Tigriopus_californicus copepod is a wonderful addition to any saltwater aquarium as this species of copepods are rich in astaxanthin which helps bring dull colored fish back to their naturally vibrant colors seen in the wild. These bright red colored copepods are larger sized copepods (250-1500 microns) and make an enticing meal to any fish due to their quirky swim pattern, whose erratic, jerky swim pattern combined with their color and size. We highly recommend these pods for reefers who keep fish with high metabolisms allowing them to forage all day long, and are an excellent choice for finicky fish. Having a live food source will also help to lower nutrients often caused by over feeding prepared foods that sink to the substrate and start to decay in your tank.
In sum, the Harpacticidea copepod Tigriopus californicus is an excellent addition to any tanks micro fauna. Providing optimum clean up capabilities combined with a ready food source. As we Huskers like to shout "go big red!"

IMG_6645.jpeg


Apocyclops_pananmensis pods are opportunistic feeders eating phytoplankton, fish waste, and other detritus in your tank. This makes them a critical part of any clean-up crew. As juveniles, Apocyclops copepods are benthic meaning they stay hidden in the rockwork, macroalgae, and glass in your aquarium. As they progress through their life cycle they become pelagic meaning they are free swimming. These life cycle changes makes them an excellent addition to aquariums with “pod hunters” as Mandarins will hunt them from the rocks and wrasses and anthias will benefit from them in the water column.
In sum, the cyclopoid copepod Apocyclops panamensis is an excellent addition to any population of microcrustaceans. Resilient and fast-growing, they are likely to colonize your aquarium and play an important role in removing unsightly algal films over the aquarium substrate and provide a constant food source.

Tisbe_biminiensis are small copepods that tend to inhabit the cracks and crevasses of live rock and macroalgae. These pods can maintain their population in your aquarium as they tend to hide in your rock work where you might see your Mandarin Dragonet hovering like a brightly colored fairy pecking at them as it constantly grazes for food. Being nocturnal in nature helps them maintain a sustainable food source in your tank, yet they still provide a highly nutritious snack or meal for your fish. Tisbe biminiensis also assist with Clean-up by consuming nuisance algae in your aquarium and refugium.
Tisbe biminiensis is a harpacticoid copepod. Thus, as an adult, it lives on the seafloor. Because it spends most of its adult days crawling around on the rock, sand and glass surfaces, it feeds primarily on detritus and algal films. Juveniles, on the other hand, inhabit the open water column where they graze on phytoplankton. We highly recommend dosing Phyto Buffet to provide for their nutritional need, and it aids in establishing colonization.
In sum, the Harpacticidea copepod Tisbe biminiensis is an excellent addition to any tanks micro fauna. providing optimum clean up capabilities in those hard to impossible to reach areas.

Parvocalanus_crassirostris is a calanoid copepod in the family Paracalanidae and are small pelagic (free swimming) copepods rich in fatty acids providing awesome nutrition to larval fish and our Mandarin dragonets. They are also a favorite of filter feeders such as feather dusters, clams, christmas tree worms, sps corals, sponges and of course Zoas. Parvocalanus crassirostris can be found throughout the tropical and subtropical Atlantic. In contrast to harpacticoid copepods, such as Tigriopus californicus and Tisbe biminiensis, calanoid copepods do not crawl on surfaces and into rockwork. Do to living in the open ocean Parvocalanus crassirostris is capable of incredible locomotion, far more active than our other pods. This copepod jumps a multitude of its own body length with each burst! This species will perform daily migrations up and down the water column in search of live micro algae. Their natural food source is live planktonic microalgae and it is absolutely necessary for their survival. Unlike other copepod species in the reef aquarium hobby, this species cannot utilize biofilms and detritus. It must be fed a diet of lipid-rich, live microalgae such as Isochrysis galbana, Rhodomonas salina or Talassiosira weissflogii. Though this dietary need presents a unique challenge, our Phyto Buffet includes 6 strains of phytoplankton rich in HUVA and lipids. Parvocalanus crassirostris is the Ferarri of copepods: it requires rocket fuel, for the ultimate performance.

Parvocalanus crassirostris are herbivores and eat live micro algae and phytoplankton only.

Acartia_tonsa are larger pelagic (free swimming) copepods providing awesome nutrition to a host of fish such as Wrasses, Anthias, Seahorses, and of course our Mandarin dragonets. Originating from the indo-pacific regions, but now found worldwide, they make welcome addition to our fish sourced from the indo-pacific. They breed year round in temperate waters so should colonize nicely in our reef tanks. They also provide an ideal nutritional profile for both photosynthetic and non-photosynthetic corals.
Acartia Tonsa are detrivores and eat micro algae and phytoplankton, uneaten fish food and fish waste making them another valuable member of our clean-up crew.

Psuedodiamptomus_pelagicus are the largest pelagic (free swimming) copepods of our three new additions so while still providing awesome nutrition high in omega fatty acid and lipids to a host of fish such as Wrasses, Athias, Seahorses, I consider these to be the best copepods for our Mandarin dragonets. They are also a great choice for breeders whose larval fish continues to need live foods past the first few days.
Psuedodiamptomus pelagicus are detrivores and eat micro algae and phytoplankton, uneaten fish food and fish waste making them another valuable member of our clean-up crew.

We highly recommend dosing Phyto Buffet to provide for their nutritional needs, and it aids in establishing colonization.

BENEFITS OF PODS IN YOUR AQUARIUM: The primary benefits include FOOD SOURCE, CLEAN UP CREW (CUC) and BIOME DIVERSITY. Copepods aid in the husbandry of certain aquarium inhabitants which require an endless food source as their metabolism requires them to hunt non-stop. These include but not limited to Mandarin Dragonets like our beloved Rainbow Wish and Paisley, other dragonets such as HUSKER our Ruby Red Dragonet (Can’t live in the Cornhusker state and have a red and yellow fish and not name it after your team lol) plus pipefish, seahorses, anthias, various gobies such as sleeper, sand sifting, etc. Copepods also provide a consistent and viable food source for many different captive bred fry. Plus as an added bonus almost all if not all of your fish in your aquarium BENEFIT as they munch on these protein and fatty acid enriched treats. Copepods are a valuable member of your clean-up crew. They aide in Algae control due to pods small size, they can get into the tiniest of crevices and clean the algae down to its roots and help reduce the formation by reducing nutrients in your aquarium. They aide nutrient export by consuming bacteria, detritus and uneaten food and converting it to protein and fatty acids for our fish. Copepods add to an increased biome when colonies of different species establish colonies with in our aquariums.

PLEASE NOTE: Reef By Steele ships all pods in all life stages. Our Pods contains a range of juvenile to adult copepods. Some juvenile copepods are difficult-to-impossible to see with the naked eye upon

Check out our Copepod selections here.

Very interesting
 

CoralB

5000 Club Member
View Badges
Joined
Mar 20, 2021
Messages
6,162
Reaction score
31,371
Location
Orlando, Florida
Haha. I love the menu analogy. No test, just FOOD for thought lol. I believe that many newer reefers don’t realize the benefits to pods in their reef and a diverse biome. So just a “little” post to generate conversation. Oh by the way, my wife @Ocean_Queenie thinks I might talk too much. I’m sure she is mistaken.
It’s all good , just having a little fun . But I have to add a suggestion which is to never tell your wife she’s mistaken ( about anything lol !! ) especially when potentially millions of people can see it :astonished-face:
Can you say “ DOG HOUSE “:beaming-face-with-smiling-eyes::rolling-on-the-floor-laughing: .I’m sure after the fall out she will have a very good Christmas . Good luck !!:smiling-face-with-sunglasses:
 

Become a reef project master!!! Have you made any DIY items for your reef lately?

  • I have made DIY items for my reef lately.

    Votes: 75 56.4%
  • I have made DIY items for my reef, but not lately.

    Votes: 33 24.8%
  • I have not made DIY items for my reef, but I plan to.

    Votes: 12 9.0%
  • I have no plans to make any DIY items for my reef.

    Votes: 11 8.3%
  • Other.

    Votes: 2 1.5%
Back
Top