Lawnmower Blenny with black spot

Kfishy

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Hi, need advice please.....
A couple days ago my lawnmower Blenny showed up with this black spot, pic attached.
He's acting fine, but is there something I need to do?
Also... Just got in RF anemones, could it be a sting?
Thank you for your help, don't want to lose this little guy.

PXL_20210703_151953517~2.jpg
 

vetteguy53081

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Its either pigment change based on diet or infection but see either being the answer .
They do require diet other than the belief they only need algae. Water quality also of importance. The trickiest part about keeping a blenny is making sure it gets enough to eat. You can tell this visually by looking at the abdomen, which should be a healthy rounded shape. A blenny with a pinched midriff isn’t finding enough food.
Although a blenny needs plenty of algae to survive, a common misconception is that it can survive on algae alone. Since blennies frequent shallow tropical waters, they find their sanctuary within the coral reefs. They circle areas with coral branches and sponges, scraping their way along the diverse sea bottom. Their feeding techniques are to pound and gnaw the coral, and as a result, they ingest detritus, or waste material primarily, from the coral. This includes bits of coral skeleton, sand, gravel, and other organic matter, such as fish eggs and tiny crustaceans.
Since a blenny in the wild does not subsist on solely algae, it stands to reason that their captive diet must be supplemented. If a blenny is not getting enough calcium carbonate in its diet, its condition will rapidly deteriorate. Therefore, it is important to offer an occasional selection of commercial algae-based wafers or pellets.
 
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Kfishy

Kfishy

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Its either pigment change based on diet or infection but see either being the answer .
They do require diet other than the belief they only need algae. Water quality also of importance. The trickiest part about keeping a blenny is making sure it gets enough to eat. You can tell this visually by looking at the abdomen, which should be a healthy rounded shape. A blenny with a pinched midriff isn’t finding enough food.
Although a blenny needs plenty of algae to survive, a common misconception is that it can survive on algae alone. Since blennies frequent shallow tropical waters, they find their sanctuary within the coral reefs. They circle areas with coral branches and sponges, scraping their way along the diverse sea bottom. Their feeding techniques are to pound and gnaw the coral, and as a result, they ingest detritus, or waste material primarily, from the coral. This includes bits of coral skeleton, sand, gravel, and other organic matter, such as fish eggs and tiny crustaceans.
Since a blenny in the wild does not subsist on solely algae, it stands to reason that their captive diet must be supplemented. If a blenny is not getting enough calcium carbonate in its diet, its condition will rapidly deteriorate. Therefore, it is important to offer an occasional selection of commercial algae-based wafers or pellets.
Thank you. He gets a mix of food, including eggs and pellets. He's also been munching on some shells and coral edges. I'll keep an eye on him and see how it goes, thanks again!
 

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