Leaving my booster pump on all night?

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Miami Reef

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I have a 44 gallon brute with a float valve. RODI with auto shut off. I usually turn on the booster pump to get 90psi (usually I get 40psi without pump)
Will my RODI 1/4 tubing burst with 90psi pressure going into it? I’m worried because once the float valve is full the booster pump doesn’t turn off.

The plumber who helped me install it was worried about this pump busting my tubing. He kept saying “90 tons of pressure in that little tube”. He wanted me to only use it when I needed it.

So basically, will my tubing burst if I let my RODI bin fill with water overnight? I’m able to fill the bin without the booster pump, but then some people said that it will degrade my Di resin faster if I only have 40psi.

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DaneGer21

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Most units have a pressure switch after the pump installed, so that once the line is closed, in your case a float valve, it will build pressure and turn itself off. This is different than the auto shutoff valve.
 

outhouse

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Most units have a pressure switch after the pump installed, so that once the line is closed, in your case a float valve, it will build pressure and turn itself off. This is different than the auto shutoff valve.
Exactly put in your electric on/off solenoid connected to a inline pressure switch. shuts water and pump off when float builds inline pressure. I have mine connected to a timer so it can only run an hour a day. that keeps my 10G top off container full. I use and aqualifter connected to my ATO for sump. This makes system foolproof
 

paparoof

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Exactly put in your electric on/off solenoid connected to a inline pressure switch. shuts water and pump off when float builds inline pressure.
^ this ^

booster pump only runs when I'm making water. bin fills up, water flow stops, system pressure builds, booster pump turns off, all is well.

Here's the switch I'm using (looks like you and I have the same pump):
 

stacksoner

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Gtinnel

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Most, if not all, 1/4 RO tubing is rated for much, much more than 90 psi. You would not be able to rupture your tubing. However, you will not want to leave your booster pump running non stop. Not only is it a waste of electricity but it also puts unnecessary wear on your pump.

I believe someone asked where you have the booster pump in the system because it's commonly put in between the sediment/carbon filters and the membrane. I have been running the same booster pump for about 10 years before all filters and it hasn't been an issue for me, so IMO it is not that big of a deal.
 

Gtinnel

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“90 tons of pressure in that little tube”
Just because I'm bored and this seemed like an absolutely absurd statement I did the calculations to determine how long of a tube you would need before there was 90 tons of outward force.

If my math is correct you would have to be running your tubing for 312 ft at 90 psi before there is a total of 90 tons of force on the ro line.

The fact that it is a smaller tube reduces the square inches, which reduces the force put on it compared to a larger tube at equal pressures.
 

stacksoner

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Just because I'm bored and this seemed like an absolutely absurd statement I did the calculations to determine how long of a tube you would need before there was 90 tons of outward force.

If my math is correct you would have to be running your tubing for 312 ft at 90 psi before there is a total of 90 tons of force on the ro line.

The fact that it is a smaller tube reduces the square inches, which reduces the force put on it compared to a larger tube at equal pressures.

It's a truly ridiculous statement. 90 tons of pressure is the equivalent of what a commercial pressure cleaning machine generates. There would be a national holiday named after aquatec and you would need a license to buy a handheld pump with that much power.
 
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Gtinnel

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It's a truly ridiculous statement. 90 tons of pressure is the equivalent of what a commercial pressure cleaning machine generates. There would be a national holiday named after aquatec and you would need a license to buy a handheld pump with that much power.
Technically since the statement just said tons and not tons per (insert some measurement of area) then it is actually referring to force not pressure. Assuming the pump can pressurize a 312 foot long 1/4 RO tube to 90 psi then it would be exerting a total of 90 tons of force.

I don't know enough about pumps/fluid dynamics to know right off if increasing the volume of a tube (in this case by increasing the length) after a pump changes its ability to produce a certain pressure. I believe it can still get a tube to 90 psi regardless of length, but I'm not positive.

Here I never though I would use math or physics in the real world. LOL
 

ying yang

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stacksoner

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Technically since the statement just said tons and not tons per (insert some measurement of area) then it is actually referring to force not pressure. Assuming the pump can pressurize a 312 foot long 1/4 RO tube to 90 psi then it would be exerting a total of 90 tons of force.

I don't know enough about pumps/fluid dynamics to know right off if increasing the volume of a tube (in this case by increasing the length) after a pump changes its ability to produce a certain pressure. I believe it can still get a tube to 90 psi regardless of length, but I'm not positive.

Here I never though I would use math or physics in the real world. LOL


90 PSI = 90 pounds per square inch.
~216,000 PSI = 90 tons per square inch.

A rifle fires a bullet out at 50,000 psi.
 

Gtinnel

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~216,000 PSI = 90 tons per square inch.
Unless I'm missing something how do you get that 216,000 PSI = 90 tons per square inch?

Since there are 2,000 lbs in a ton then why wouldnt 180,000 PSI = 90 tons per square inch (TSI) which is a measurement of pressure you don't commonly see because it's insanely large.

Plus the statement from the plumber said 90 tons not 90 tons per square inch. So the quote should be referring to force not pressure. Even though it incorrectly describes it as pressure. They are similar other than pressure is force applied to a specific unit of area.

Which is why a 1/4" RO tubing can withstand 90 tons of force when it is spread out over a large length of tubing. It wouldn't stand a chance of being able to contain 90 tons per square inch.

I bet the plumber never imagined some meaningless statement that he made would lead to a debate between two complete strangers online. LOL. Ecspecially since we all seem to agree the tubing would be fine but the OP shouldn't leave the pump on all the time.
 
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stacksoner

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Unless I'm missing something how do you get that 216,000 PSI = 90 tons per square inch?

Since there are 2,000 lbs in a ton then why wouldnt 180,000 PSI = 90 tons per square inch (TSI) which is a measurement of pressure you don't commonly see because it's insanely large.

Plus the statement from the plumber said 90 tons not 90 tons per square inch. So the quote should be referring to force not pressure. Even though it incorrectly describes it as pressure. They are similar other than pressure is force applied to a specific unit of area.

Which is why a 1/4" RO tubing can withstand 90 tons of force when it is spread out over a large length of tubing. It wouldn't stand a chance of being able to contain 90 tons per square inch.

I bet the plumber never imagined some meaningless statement that he made would lead to a debate between two complete strangers online. LOL. Ecspecially since we all seem to agree the tubing would be fine but the OP shouldn't leave the pump on all the time.
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Tamberav

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I forget my pump on and it definitely won’t burst a RODI line lol!!

It is not good for the pump though.

I am wondering where on the RODI do I install the pressure switch? I have one but never installed it as I am not sure where it goes. That would help me not burn my pump up!
 

stacksoner

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I forget my pump on and it definitely won’t burst a RODI line lol!!

It is not good for the pump though.

I am wondering where on the RODI do I install the pressure switch? I have one but never installed it as I am not sure where it goes. That would help me not burn my pump up!

Booster pumps don't burn out when ran dry! S Screenshot_20210808-022843.png
 

Gtinnel

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Are you from the Enland or the US? Your conversion website is using the long ton (2240lbs= 1 long ton) where as in the US we use the short ton traditionally (short ton =2000lbs).
To convert from tons of force per square inch (using the US standard of short tons) to psi (which is just pounds per square inch) you just have to convert tons to pounds. 90 tons (short) x 2000 =180,000 lbs.
 

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Booster pumps don't burn out when ran dry! S Screenshot_20210808-022843.png

I was being dramatic a bit as I don’t know what it would do long term. Just that it gets a lot louder when the flood guardian stops the flow as it is trying to pump but can not and the power supply gets pretty dang warm.
 
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