Led lighting full spectrum blue diode

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sneekapeek

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Wanted to talk about full spectrum blue diodes in the led market and how come we don’t implement these diodes. Instead what is usually used is a shotgun approach mixing an array of spectral diodes to hopefully get the best range for coral growth.
How come this is the norm? The technology doesn’t exist? Or is it cheaper to have one of each type.
Wanted to hear your thoughts because if I wanted to mimic a radium bulb, my guess would be to make a diode that emits it’s spectrum with an overall blue hue.
I look at radion fixtures and I see too much wasteful diodes that can be mitigated by having a full spectrum diode at 14-20k output, thus watt for watt I would actually reduce electricity consumption. I’ve seen other lights run full spectrum diodes at 20k output and I wonder why other company’s don’t use this technology. Patented…please explain why someone would not want that, because it seems I would.
 
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Because there is no high kelvin white LED like a 10k or 20k bulb. You can't get any blue or cyan in a "white" LED as they are currently build, nor can you get violet and UV.

I should specify, the "white" LEDs are essentially a blue diode with a phosphor that absorbs the blue and emits white. Depending on how much blue is absorbed you get a more "cool" or high kelvin appearance. The blue in question is close to a "royal blue" which is why I said you get no blue or cyan in it.
 
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I should specify, the "white" LEDs are essentially a blue diode with a phosphor that absorbs the blue and emits white. Depending on how much blue is absorbed you get a more "cool" or high kelvin appearance. The blue in question is close to a "royal blue" which is why I said you get no blue or cyan in it.
I understand, so why the other color diodes in fixture if that diode is only missing royal blue. So why not just run that diode and whatever that phosphor does negate. Run other diodes that fill In the gap. Just another way to skin the cat?
 
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For example I see this diode deliver a full spectrum light I just want to know why people don’t run these in fixtures? What the consensus.
 

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damsels are not mean

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For example I see this diode deliver a full spectrum light I just want to know why people don’t run these in fixtures? What the consensus.
Which diode is that? Usually it's gonna come down to cost, practicality, and features of the diode in question. Power efficiency, brightness, color rendering, etc. also, people like different balances of light. Which is why some extra diodes are usually added to fixtures that are designed around white and/or blue LEDs.
 
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Which diode is that? Usually it's gonna come down to cost, practicality, and features of the diode in question. Power efficiency, brightness, color rendering, etc. also, people like different balances of light. Which is why some extra diodes are usually added to fixtures that are designed around white and/or blue LEDs.
I know most people frown upon the brand this diode comes from. I would rather not mention. It’s a 20k blue full spectrum diode. That’s why I’m wondering is this approach the ultimate 1:1 approach to replicate tried and true radium bulbs, accented with blue leds of course!
Let’s say you are coral farmer and just need the juicy spectrum and some blues to take photos. Wouldn’t this solution be a good approach, or are the other filler diodes necessary to color corals to extremes. I see jf uses only blue plus bulbs and I look at this diode being a home run!
 

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I know most people frown upon the brand this diode comes from. I would rather not mention. It’s a 20k blue full spectrum diode. That’s why I’m wondering is this approach the ultimate 1:1 approach to replicate tried and true radium bulbs, accented with blue leds of course!
Let’s say you are coral farmer and just need the juicy spectrum and some blues to take photos. Wouldn’t this solution be a good approach, or are the other filler diodes necessary to color corals to extremes. I see jf uses only blue plus bulbs and I look at this diode being a home run!
Well, any light will grow corals provided it's bright enough and not too bright. I think coral farmers these days run heavily blue spectrums with lots of blue/violet LEDs. It's hard to say because I don't know any personally, but considering that's what people want to buy it would make sense. Knowing how photosynthesis works, it would be reasonable to assume corals benefit from some red light too. Other than that I don't think it really matters what you give them.
 
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Well, any light will grow corals provided it's bright enough and not too bright. I think coral farmers these days run heavily blue spectrums with lots of blue/violet LEDs. It's hard to say because I don't know any personally, but considering that's what people want to buy it would make sense. Knowing how photosynthesis works, it would be reasonable to assume corals benefit from some red light too. Other than that I don't think it really matters what you give them.
So true my friend, corals don’t need as much as we usually give them! I was mostly pondering why other manufacturers other than one I know of would use this diode or a similar unit.
 
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"hopefully get the best range for coral growth."

That's the thing. Reef aquarium lighting is a compromise between aesthetics, spectrum and intensity. Hard coral, soft coral, deep and shallow water coral have different preferences/needs. What's best for coral growth and health isn't likely to be what we like to see.
 
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"hopefully get the best range for coral growth."

That's the thing. Reef aquarium lighting is a compromise between aesthetics, spectrum and intensity. Hard coral, soft coral, deep and shallow water coral have different preferences/needs. What's best for coral growth and health isn't likely to be what we like to see.
And furthermore not only for coral growth but coral coloration! I just think I’d like to buy a product that met a certain need. Not so much a range! I know I wanna keep acros…I wanna color and grow them the best I can offer. No company I know of caters to a type! It’s like losing a half your user base because this guy wants acros lol! Also, I see most manufacturers don’t sell spread of light well, watt for watt compared to a radium.
 
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