nonprofit idea

nicholas2010e

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Why is there not a non profit that takes coral donations from aquarium hobbyists to help restore the coral reefs? There are many organizations that try to replant the coral reefs but why not take coral donations from reefers? I am sure they would get hundreds of donations from people wanting to help.
 
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Sharkbait19

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I really like the idea and the thought behind it, but there is a lot that complicates it.
The three big ones are:
Bringing captive strains into the wild that weren’t meant to be there.
Introducing nonnative hitchhikers that can damage a reef.
One mislabel can bring an invasive coral that damages the initial population.
 
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nicholas2010e

nicholas2010e

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I really like the idea and the thought behind it, but there is a lot that complicates it.
The three big ones are:
Bringing captive strains into the wild that weren’t meant to be there.
Introducing nonnative hitchhikers that can damage a reef.
One mislabel can bring an invasive coral that damages the initial population.
I understand that. However, nonprofits such as CORAL could easily provide a list of the only types of corals accepted (what is native to the area). Furthermore, they can follow strict treatment and quarantine of the coral to eliminate pests and diseases. Even if this process lasts a couple weeks many corals take much much longer to get to the needed size.
 

tehmadreefer

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The same reason you don’t throw unwanted pets into the wild. Invasive pests, disease, etc. there are a ton of coral restoration companies that do this in controlled conditions and in the actual ocean via leased water sites.
 
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Sharkbait19

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I understand that. However, nonprofits such as CORAL could easily provide a list of the only types of corals accepted (what is native to the area). Furthermore, they can follow strict treatment and quarantine of the coral to eliminate pests and diseases. Even if this process lasts a couple weeks many corals take much much longer to get to the needed size.
I agree that it is possible to avoid these issues, but one screw up and it all gets messed up. Think of how easy it is for hitchhikers to go undetected for years with us. If it goes wrong in the wild, guess who gets blamed?
 

Azedenkae

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I understand that. However, nonprofits such as CORAL could easily provide a list of the only types of corals accepted (what is native to the area). Furthermore, they can follow strict treatment and quarantine of the coral to eliminate pests and diseases. Even if this process lasts a couple weeks many corals take much much longer to get to the needed size.
That sounds way more costly than if the nonprofits just mass-grow coral frags themselves and plant them themselves... like this: https://www.daydreamisland.com/eco-tourism.

Don't get me wrong, it is a nice idea to donate corals to a nonprofit and have them quarantine those corals and plant them and all that, but in practice the costs can be pretty crazy.
 

Mibu

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I understand that. However, nonprofits such as CORAL could easily provide a list of the only types of corals accepted (what is native to the area). Furthermore, they can follow strict treatment and quarantine of the coral to eliminate pests and diseases. Even if this process lasts a couple weeks many corals take much much longer to get to the needed size.
They put bans on certain coral already. I understand what you are asking. But, we have introduced micro algae into california and florida that became invasive.

Basicially what I am saying is. There is no saying what is going to hitch hike with a coral.
 

blasterman

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Because if a wild coral reef is dieing because of environmental conditions, CO2 , temp levels etc. what good is replanting it from captive tanks?

Many reefs that are under stress seem to do fine if cuttings are taken a few miles away and kept in a protected area. I have yet to hear a valid explanation for this but have my own theories. We might be dealing with cyclical dieoffs accelerated by warmer waters and nutrient levels. Explains why the mass fragging in the same location grows fine.
 
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mdb_talon

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Countless issues and several of them already mentioned. I see the overarching issue being it just is not practical. For the cost of me shipping them coral, the logistics of them receiving, verifying coral species, quarantining, etc they could have grown several dozen or more frags.

For those really concerned it seem much more worthwhile and practical to send your favorite nonprofits some $$$.
 

Do you quarantine new coral before adding it to your reef tank?

  • YES always

    Votes: 80 17.4%
  • Sometimes depending (tell us why)

    Votes: 56 12.1%
  • NO never

    Votes: 312 67.7%
  • Other (please explain)

    Votes: 13 2.8%
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