Pretty sure its gunna die right?

RedRain

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Just got it 24hrs ago, hour drive home. I know I should put water specs but I really am just hoping to know if this thing is dead. Should I go ahead and remove it. Iv never had one of these die.. but it looks too far gone. Tentacles are still reacting to stimuli but the hole keeps getting bigger. Thanks

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RedRain

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That’s the mouth. Wouldn’t toss it yet. What the heck is that other one in the corner?
I know that's the mouth but it isn't opening like its normal. Its opening like its torn. White stuff coming out. I haven't had many deaths but i think that is a bad thing. Its a white rock flower anemone. Just got it. hasn't spread out yet but it has found its footing
 

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It looks like it’s up against the glass. They like moderate to vigorous flow. Is it getting that? If not, I’d move it to where it will.
 
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RedRain

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It looks like it’s up against the glass. They like moderate to vigorous flow. Is it getting that? If not, I’d move it to where it will.
It was until I noticed the hole getting bigger. I would say it has moderate flow. It is not up against the glass.
 
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RedRain

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Not dead.
ok, thank you. ill turn down the light a little, put it back into moderate flow and monitor it then.
If it turns towards death what should I be looking for in a frogspawn? It is a small tank and a death could mean a great deal in water quality.
 

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I would suggest erring on lower flow, just keep a little tentacle movement.

Watch for retracting and/or tissue recession on the skeleton. Outside of polyp bailout they don’t just die in the course of hours from my findings. If you see brown jelly forming toss the frag immediately.

It looks angry, but only 24hrs in. I’m guessing your chemistry differed significantly from the shop.

How small of a tank? A single coral death shouldn’t crash an established system.
 

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I personally wouldn't get rid of it unless all of the tissue is gone (unless it has brown jelly disease like already mentioned). I agree it doesn't look happy but it is currently far from dead.
 
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RedRain

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I would suggest erring on lower flow, just keep a little tentacle movement.

Watch for retracting and/or tissue recession on the skeleton. Outside of polyp bailout they don’t just die in the course of hours from my findings. If you see brown jelly forming toss the frag immediately.

It looks angry, but only 24hrs in. I’m guessing your chemistry differed significantly from the shop.

How small of a tank? A single coral death shouldn’t crash an established system.
5gal. I use the reef store's Red Sea water mix. Water change was 15% yesterday when 3 new items were added. The Flower anemone was recently taken from the ocean and I suspect will take a bit to unfold. The new acan is very happy. Frogspawn isn't, Obv. I do a 15-25% water change every week. I get the water tested at the store. It's perfect every time.

"Watch for retracting and/or tissue recession on the skeleton. " Do you mean from the mouth out or the bottom of the base up?

20210503_224819.jpg
 
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RedRain

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I personally wouldn't get rid of it unless all of the tissue is gone (unless it has brown jelly disease like already mentioned). I agree it doesn't look happy but it is currently far from dead.
Thank you. That's a relief. I thought for sure everyone would say its a goner.
 

Gtinnel

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I get the water tested at the store. It's perfect every time.
Having a trusted lfs test your water parameters is okay, but I'd strongly recommend getting your own test kits to at least verify what they say. If they mess up the testing it's your tank that could potentially suffer not theirs.
 
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RedRain

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Having a trusted lfs test your water parameters is okay, but I'd strongly recommend getting your own test kits to at least verify what they say. If they mess up the testing it's your tank that could potentially suffer not theirs.
That's fair. Id me more worried about that if it were a normal lfs. Its a coral and saltwater primary store. We have been working with the same rep for the past 6 months. We visit every Sunday. That being said, I do have one. I just don't use it often since the results have lined up a few times. I'm very lucky to have a great store.
 

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Not dead but very unhappy. What is age of tank ?
It takes a moderate level of skill to care for Hammer corals in a saltwater tank. Like most other coral species, Euphyllia requires Stable tank conditions, and is intolerant to major swings in water quality, and is sensitive to almost any level of copper in the water. Since they are a large polyp stony coral, calcium and alkalinity are two very important water parameters that will affect the growth of your coral. This coral will start to die off if the calcium levels are too low. A calcium level of about 400 ppm is just right.
This coral species isn’t terribly picky when it comes to the proper placement in your tank. The trick would really be just to avoid the extremes. Avoid extremely bright locations or areas of very high current, and avoid areas that are too dark or with currents that are too low. Fast currents risk damaging the soft, fleshy polyps (and getting an infection). Bright lights will cause bleaching. Insufficient lighting will cause the poor coral to wither away and starve to death.
Hammer corals only require a moderate amount of light for photosynthesis and can grow well in the intermediate regions of your tank. Just about any reef LED lighting should be sufficient for most tanks. Reduce white light intensity and get it off the sand bed which sand can irritate it.
The polyps should sway in the current, but not sustain so much pressure they are constantly bent over their skeleton. Too much flow will tear the polyps (worst case) and cause the polyps do not extend in the first place (best case). So, don’t give them too much flow.
The hammer coral is considered to be an aggressive coral species that will attack its neighbors with sweeper tentacles. These are stinging nematocysts (similar to the sting of an anemone) on the end of a specialized polyp that can extend several inches away from the body of the coral. The sweeper tentacles pack a punch and will chemically burn any neighboring corals.
Hammer corals are more subdued eaters who would benefit from the occasional feeding of a meaty marine food like mysis and brine shrimp.
 
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RedRain

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Not dead but very unhappy. What is age of tank ?
It takes a moderate level of skill to care for Hammer corals in a saltwater tank. Like most other coral species, Euphyllia requires Stable tank conditions, and is intolerant to major swings in water quality, and is sensitive to almost any level of copper in the water. Since they are a large polyp stony coral, calcium and alkalinity are two very important water parameters that will affect the growth of your coral. This coral will start to die off if the calcium levels are too low. A calcium level of about 400 ppm is just right.
This coral species isn’t terribly picky when it comes to the proper placement in your tank. The trick would really be just to avoid the extremes. Avoid extremely bright locations or areas of very high current, and avoid areas that are too dark or with currents that are too low. Fast currents risk damaging the soft, fleshy polyps (and getting an infection). Bright lights will cause bleaching. Insufficient lighting will cause the poor coral to wither away and starve to death.
Hammer corals only require a moderate amount of light for photosynthesis and can grow well in the intermediate regions of your tank. Just about any reef LED lighting should be sufficient for most tanks. Reduce white light intensity and get it off the sand bed which sand can irritate it.
The polyps should sway in the current, but not sustain so much pressure they are constantly bent over their skeleton. Too much flow will tear the polyps (worst case) and cause the polyps do not extend in the first place (best case). So, don’t give them too much flow.
The hammer coral is considered to be an aggressive coral species that will attack its neighbors with sweeper tentacles. These are stinging nematocysts (similar to the sting of an anemone) on the end of a specialized polyp that can extend several inches away from the body of the coral. The sweeper tentacles pack a punch and will chemically burn any neighboring corals.
Hammer corals are more subdued eaters who would benefit from the occasional feeding of a meaty marine food like mysis and brine shrimp.
About 6-7 months.
This is my second hammer, the first is happy. My sps coral are also doing fine, showing new growth. Due to the small weekly water changes and the very small size of the tank I think dosing calcium is a bad idea.
 
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RedRain

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I would suggest erring on lower flow, just keep a little tentacle movement.

Watch for retracting and/or tissue recession on the skeleton. Outside of polyp bailout they don’t just die in the course of hours from my findings. If you see brown jelly forming toss the frag immediately.

It looks angry, but only 24hrs in. I’m guessing your chemistry differed significantly from the shop.

How small of a tank? A single coral death shouldn’t crash an established system.
Is this what you mean by retracting?
 

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dedragon

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dosing calcium isnt ever a bad idea, if you have ca, and alk decreasing daily it is the best practice to replace it with doing. I prefer using 2 part personally. The coral is fine, just adjusting. Give it lower light and medium to lower flow for now and just wait for it.
 

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About 6-7 months.
This is my second hammer, the first is happy. My sps coral are also doing fine, showing new growth. Due to the small weekly water changes and the very small size of the tank I think dosing calcium is a bad idea.
It’s not. All mine started with 1-2 heads
This is now:
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2C8ABA4A-C194-41B0-8513-3218C2090466.jpeg
 
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RedRain

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dosing calcium isnt ever a bad idea, if you have ca, and alk decreasing daily it is the best practice to replace it with doing. I prefer using 2 part personally. The coral is fine, just adjusting. Give it lower light and medium to lower flow for now and just wait for it.
I suppose I'm just concerned with adding too much in my 5gal. The red sea salt coral pro that I'm using is already pretty high in calcium. What are the draw backs to 465-550 ppm? Having too much that is.
 
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