Discussion in 'Battlecorals' started by Battlecorals, Oct 7, 2015.

!!!SPS SUCK! THE ACRO-FUGIUM WRITE UP!!! I guess I finally finished this thing, sort of

How about a complete reversal of nearly all of the preconceived essential rules to keeping our sps healthy? Now this really isn’t so new a...
By Battlecorals, Oct 7, 2015 | |
  1. Battlecorals

    Battlecorals Aquaculturist R2R Supporter Gold Sponsor

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    HI there,

    Yeah I still do about 100 gallon WC on my main roughly once a month but thats really about it besides skimming.
     

  2. Rickyrooz

    Rickyrooz Acropora Nut

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  3. Vaughn17

    Vaughn17 Well-Known Member

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    I believe there is some bad info in this thread: Studies I have seen, suggest that elevated N and P by themselves are not detrimental to coral growth.
    Studies that I have read indicate that PO4 inhibits calcification in corals at elevated levels (which vary, depending on the species). I'm on the zero-zero is crap bandwagon, for sure, but algae isn't the only detrimental effect of too much phosphate(s). I dose NO3 and recently experimented dosing PO4 in my nutrient challenged 38 gallon sps tank. I raised the PO4 as high as .5 ppm (with NO3 between 2.5 and 5.0). Stylo (purple and rainbow) grew like crazy at that high level. Most of the acros maintained colors and PE, but I lost frags of Hawkins Echinata and Flame Fox and a few others started to turn brown. I lowered the PO4 and the browning corals quickly recovered. The sweet spot for PO4 in my tank is between .1 and .2.
     
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  4. Ssteve

    Ssteve Active Member

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    So I have a newly setup 120g tank(5 months old) but it has about 60lbs of liverock that's out of a tank that's been running fairly high nutrients since 2002. On the initial cycle I got the regular cyano bloom. It went away, I added more fish, some corals, blasted everything with some t5's and all was good for a few months. A few weeks ago I started getting what looked like cyano again in the sandbed but its turning a red color with almost a hair consistency coming from parts of it. I have just been brushing off algea from the rocks and vacuuming the sandbed to keep it bearable to look at. I was going to start some gfo and activated carbon to see if it would help, but plan to run about 1/4-1/3 the recommended amounts.

    I don't run macros, a deep sandbed or dose anything. Just skimming, filter sock and biweekly waterchanges. I feed pretty heavy, twice a day a mix of pellets and flakes from a auto feeder and a chunk of frozen every other day as well as a couple squirts of reef nutrition arcti pods at the very least every other day if not every day.

    levels are all fairly low surprisingly enough, and the kicker is that colors are amazing. Got a ton of frags from a friend who has a well established tank that shows good growth in but once in my tank the colors are a whole ton better. Not sure about groth cause its too early to tell, but they have all colored up extensively.

    My problem is the algae though, should I run a little gfo see if that helps?
     
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  5. AcanthurusRex

    AcanthurusRex Active Member R2R Supporter

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    Hopefully this link works;
    https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/11/161102155706.htm
    In the simplest terms symbiotic corals out compete algae in a nutrient poor environment. Measured nutrient levels on healthy reefs are low, basically zero. As Adam has pointed out the corals need nutrients. The ocean is effectively dosing the nutrients at a level that is completely consumed on the reef. At higher levels of nutrients the coral will be out competeted by the "uglies".
    In our little boxes we are always on a knife edge between too little or too much nutrients, the bigger the system the duller the knife but we are limited. These corals want clean water with access to unlimited nutrients. Finding a methodology that maintains our little systems on the edge indefinitely is our challenge.
     
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  6. Ericba

    Ericba Member NJRC Member

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    Are there any good methods to help reduce iron in our systems?
     
  7. kacrocorals581

    kacrocorals581 Gotta have that acro

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    Algae turf scrubber or a good old water change
     
  8. milfymartin86

    milfymartin86 Member

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    Great write up Adam! As you know my tank is new and that pack from you is growing at a great rate, but the colors since I received them has gone down! All levels are spot on besides NO3 it's at zero but hopefully they will raise soon and the color will return!
     
  9. Floyd R Turbo

    Floyd R Turbo Super Duper Member R2R Supporter Gold Sponsor Toys For Kids Sponsor 2018 Article Contributor

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    Iron is nearly impossible to maintain at readable levels in a reef tank because it is highly reactive, or at least, that's what I understood. So my question is, why would you want to or need to reduce iron? If anything, some people dose it on purpose. IIRC it binds phosphate nearly immediately upon introduction into the aquarium.
     
  10. Ericba

    Ericba Member NJRC Member

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    Trying to reduce iron after reading above quote from Robert.
     
  11. Paul B

    Paul B Valuable Member R2R Supporter Reef Spotlight Award Partner Member 2019 Reef Tank 365 Article Contributor Build Thread Contributor

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    Don't store tools in your tank.
    Is this bad? :eek:

    [​IMG]
     
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  12. Mel 2038

    Mel 2038 Active Member

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    Now that's funny! This should be the "poster" for a well built reef.
     
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  13. ehutchby

    ehutchby Active Member

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    Warning: This is a loaded question, that I think has some relevance to this thread. After all of the discussion that I've read and after running several SPS dominated systems with many different methods, how would you set up a Brand New SPS dominated system's filtration? Not including the lighting, pumps and turnover rates. Just the filtration methods.

    This is what I'm thinking. Please shoot it down or add suggestions.
    Main Display tank:
    1. Curing new, clean rock from Real Reef Rock. (no pests).
    2. Adding a shallow, maybe 2 inch sand bed (only because I like the look of sand beds, but don't like the extra work)
    3. Fish: don't want to get too granular. My new set up is 150g total water volume. I'll probably have a couple of tangs, cleaner wrasse, clean up crew and a family of anthias.
    Sump/Refugium:
    1. Incorporating a Roller Mat to the sump. The goal is to catch the large particles in the water column.
    2. Large refugium with Chaeto, with Maxpect red growth light.
    3. Deltec Skimmer: rated for a little over 200 gallons.
    4. OR add an Algae Scrubber, in place of the Chaeto.

    I'm thinking this set up could be pretty flexible to allow me to add/subtract one of the filtration methods in the Sump to either add or lower my nitrate/phosphate levels.
    thoughts? thanks in advance..
     
  14. tigé21v

    tigé21v Active Member

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    Sounds like a good plan. I'm getting ready to redo my sump with something very similar.
    Does anyone know if acros are also using nutrients (NO3/PO4) once the lights are off, or is the only food source whatever the polyps catch?
     
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