Tired of AC bricks? Try the DCBuddy

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theatrus

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because im a big dummy and really spit balling on this electrical stuff can you explain a little more on how these work?
No worries.

For DC, its as simple as Volts * Amps. 5A @ 12V is 60W (5 * 12).

The pumps there claim 11W peak. At @12V this is (11 / 12) = 0.92 Amps. So three of them are just fine.

(I had a typo for 80W before, corrected to 60W).

You don't want to put all the loads at 100%, so buffer at about 80% - which gives 48W for a good steady state.
 

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No worries.

For DC, its as simple as Volts * Amps. 5A @ 12V is 60W (5 * 12).

The pumps there claim 11W peak. At @12V this is (11 / 12) = 0.92 Amps. So three of them are just fine.

(I had a typo for 80W before, corrected to 60W).

You don't want to put all the loads at 100%, so buffer at about 80% - which gives 48W for a good steady state.
dcbuddy here I come.. woot woot

is there a mox per port on the 24v?
 
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Ok, Revision B units ordered - lots of cleanup and small adjustments. And... the first version of the "Split" version with a selectable 3 ports at a fixed 12V or 24V (yay!).

I've also started updating GitHub with the files. It includes some of the original case files (will push Revision B when I've validated it), as well as some of the production files of the DCBuddy Split. I do need to make a pass on the documentation (I mean, some of the schematic sheets don't have titles even) but thats a bit lower on the priority list to the user documentation and making a few firmware revisions.
 

MikeTheNewbie

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the "Split" version with a selectable 3 ports at a fixed 12V or 24V (yay!).
Oh wow what do you mean with selectable on the fixed version?
Do you mean, firmware configurable?
If so, have you thought about means to reduce chances of plugging the passthrough devices to the 12/24v ports or vice versa?
I've plugged stuff to the wrong voltage or polarity so many times :p
I thought a different connector or color coding on the 3D printed case could be used for fixed ports. If any ports are configurable, if the LED indicators are RGB, they could be used to differentiate pass through and stepdown voltages....
 
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Oh wow what do you mean with selectable on the fixed version?
Do you mean, firmware configurable?
If so, have you thought about means to reduce chances of plugging the passthrough devices to the 12/24v ports or vice versa?
I've plugged stuff to the wrong voltage or polarity so many times :p
I thought a different connector or color coding on the 3D printed case could be used for fixed ports. If any ports are configurable, if the LED indicators are RGB, they could be used to differentiate pass through and stepdown voltages....

Not software, gotta pop open the unit and move a jumper. And all three aux ports are still the same voltage - no magic per port switching action :)

The top case will mark the ports that are different. Can also use different color On LEDs.
 

MikeTheNewbie

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Not software, gotta pop open the unit and move a jumper. And all three aux ports are still the same voltage - no magic per port switching action :)

The top case will mark the ports that are different. Can also use different color On LEDs.
Jumper sounds great
 

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love this, 100% will use this in my next large reef tank build. I wonder if there are any ESPHome boards to bring in the other features of reef pi, salinity, PH, temp, etc.
 
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Hope everyone has had or is continuing to have a nice extended weekend.

Some updates:
- DCBuddy RevB(2) builds are continuing at the manufacturer. It took a little back and forth as I had mis-specified a board design rule for the thick copper outer layers which caused some grief (for reference, make sure your clearance is at minimum 0.2mm). This has been sorted out but cost about 3 days.
- I have organized and tested my stash of DC power cables. I have... a lot of DC power cables. Making sure the cables are actually 18AWG, not aluminum, etc. Both 2.5mm and 2.1mm centers.
- Waiting on the right size heat shrink tubing to build up the 32V supplies. You always have the wrong size, especially at the larger sizes with the self sealing inner layers.
- Set up the basic continuous integration and build system for firmware and configuration, and a quick page to reprogram or configure WiFi over USB if required. Started plugging at some documentation as well (not complete by any stretch - needs a lot of pictures)
- Improving the firmware from the basic structure to handle port faults - if the port over-currents, it's shut down, and a fault current is sent (appears as a sense current of "4.75A"). In this situation, in order to try to recover, the port needs to be turned off and on and a log error should be raised to its visible in Home Assistant. If the port keeps on faulting, it should just be turned off.

I'm a software developer normally, but to be quite honest I appreciate the component and declarative model of ESPHome quite a bit. It's a nice meta-compiler for connecting things up, and is easy for someone else to understand and make small adjustments. Plus, going from zero to running project is very fast.
 

Minifoot77

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Hope everyone has had or is continuing to have a nice extended weekend.

Some updates:
- DCBuddy RevB(2) builds are continuing at the manufacturer. It took a little back and forth as I had mis-specified a board design rule for the thick copper outer layers which caused some grief (for reference, make sure your clearance is at minimum 0.2mm). This has been sorted out but cost about 3 days.
- I have organized and tested my stash of DC power cables. I have... a lot of DC power cables. Making sure the cables are actually 18AWG, not aluminum, etc. Both 2.5mm and 2.1mm centers.
- Waiting on the right size heat shrink tubing to build up the 32V supplies. You always have the wrong size, especially at the larger sizes with the self sealing inner layers.
- Set up the basic continuous integration and build system for firmware and configuration, and a quick page to reprogram or configure WiFi over USB if required. Started plugging at some documentation as well (not complete by any stretch - needs a lot of pictures)
- Improving the firmware from the basic structure to handle port faults - if the port over-currents, it's shut down, and a fault current is sent (appears as a sense current of "4.75A"). In this situation, in order to try to recover, the port needs to be turned off and on and a log error should be raised to its visible in Home Assistant. If the port keeps on faulting, it should just be turned off.

I'm a software developer normally, but to be quite honest I appreciate the component and declarative model of ESPHome quite a bit. It's a nice meta-compiler for connecting things up, and is easy for someone else to understand and make small adjustments. Plus, going from zero to running project is very fast.
These should still work with 36v if I'm tracking correctly? Just different input power supply?
 

Minifoot77

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Whats the ready date and didn't someone say there was preorder?
 

David_CO

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If I’m understanding the current rev is 1 voltage only? Standing by to pre-order a 12/24v hybrid option.
 

Mattiejay6

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Correct. I have the samples of the split voltage coming in the same order, but it will take a little while to validate and test.
As someone who is not tech savvy, whats the best way to go about Home Assistant? I ordered HA Green, but let me tell you what.. getting this thing to work... is a nightmare.. cant even connect to the thing to do the initial set up.
 

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I agree the market is probably slim for a DIN-based implementation but I blame that on the proprietary nature the manufacturers in this industry push the consumers into as you echoed above.

Personally, I like to do current sensing/metering on every device (AC or DC) and dislike the fact the EB832 doesn't support it on their 24V accessory or 1LINK ports. Even if we built a EB832-clone that did have the hardware in it to support current sensing for the DC ports, I bet the EB832 protocol doesn't support pushing that back to the Apex.

I've got about 30 devices that I want full power control over (switching and sensing) with only 7 of them being 120v AC-based. "Power Brick Hell" is part of the problem, but I don't want to lose control, metrics, or quality with changing to a new solution to manage power. I'd rather spend $1000 on a high-end industrial-grade power management solution vs than buying 3 more EB832s.

Reef factory makes use of DIN mounted options - their dosing pumps use DIN rail for mounting.

Im surprised this hasnt been wide spread. Whats the point of ears and multiple screws to mount something when it could easily be clipped onto rail and moved around as needed.
 

How much do you care about having a display FREE of wires, pumps and equipment?

  • Want it squeaky clean! Wires be danged!

    Votes: 153 40.2%
  • A few things are ok with me!

    Votes: 194 50.9%
  • No care at all! Bring it on!

    Votes: 34 8.9%
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