Water parameter/high phosphate/carbon

6lue9uy

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Hello all, in to the hobby about half year now. The tank been running good, was in a 20gallon long, and transferred everything in to a 40g breeder with 20g sump. corals are growing. I finally start to see Coralie algae.
So now there is couple problems I am trying to address.
1st: I've been having little bit white sponge for a while but because it's mostly around my gsp frag I didn't bother removing it until now

2nd: Then I noticed bubble algae in crusted in the white sponge so I've tried to remove/brush off the algae and sponge while I was doing water change in old tank water bucket

My parameters are 0.3 phosphate, 5-12 assuming 7 nitrate with nyos test kit, kh apex keeping around 8.7, calcium around 430-450, mag around 1300-1350, ph 7.99-8.13, ammonia nearly 0? Salifert test kit

I assume I'm getting bubble algae and high phosphate because I started feeding more (AB+, reef roid) almost everyday in rotation, (frozen miysts shrimp) 2times a week, and pellet food everyday.
skimmer run time 4hr a day. carbon in brs mini reactor packed full 9hr a day. Some sea lettuce in refugium.

My plan is to run skimmer longer sames goes with reactor. Also cut down feeding 3 or 4 times a week for coral food, once a week for shimp. Still once a day for fish and see what are the changes

I am just wondering if I run carbon reactor is there a point for me to dosing carbon? I see that dosing carbon will reduce phosphate and also brings out corals color more?

Currently I am only been dosing alk

Could you guys provide me with some options that would be great

 

TexanCanuck

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Hi there, and welcome to the hobby.

Your protein skimmer is probably one of the best methods of mechanical filtration you have available to you, so since you have one, I would start by running it continuously (24/7) except for when you are feeding. This will help remove waste from your tank before it has the chance to break down into nitrates and phosphates.

With respect to "carbon", I think you are confusing running a carbon reactor and carbon dosing.

  • A carbon reactor (with granulated activated charcoal) is a form of chemical filtration that works through ADSORPTION - the complex surface structure of the charcoal creates an environment which will chemically trap dissolved organic compounds from the water column. The devices work best with lower water flow rates (to provide more contact time between the water and the charcoal) and will eventually reach capacity and need to be changed. There is a LOT of debate about how much charcoal to use and how often to run it, but many people run a carbon reactor 24/7 using the amount of charcoal recommended by the manufacturer.
  • Carbon DOSING is a form of bacteria supplementation in which a carbon-rich media (such as bio-pellets) are used in a reactor to provide a growth medium on which heterotrophic bacteria will grow. The bacteria will them scavenge nitrogenous waste from the water column, and create non-toxic waste in the water column (which can be kept in check through regular water changes). However, the bacteria need to be added on a regular basis, and eventually the bio-pellets will also need to be replenished.
So while both methods use "carbon", they are actually two very different methods.

Since you already have charcoal in a mini reactor, your best bet is to start by running it 24/7, and changing the media every 3 weeks.

With respect to your feeding cadence, that's very hard to answer without more insight into what livestock you have in the tank.

One other thought - the one thing you haven't mentioned in your lighting schedule. Nuisance algae is often a result from too much lighting for too long of a photo period. Have you thought about this?
 

Pistondog

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Most run their skimmers 24/7. This may not be necessary if less does what you want. The skimmer will remove suspended organics faster, which may not be desirable if you just broadcast fed. Experiment. I'm trying 12/12 since starting to dose phyto.
I think carbon dosing would be good to reduce nutrients and increase biodiversity.
Reef roids is high in phosphate.
 
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6lue9uy

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Hi there, and welcome to the hobby.

Your protein skimmer is probably one of the best methods of mechanical filtration you have available to you, so since you have one, I would start by running it continuously (24/7) except for when you are feeding. This will help remove waste from your tank before it has the chance to break down into nitrates and phosphates.

With respect to "carbon", I think you are confusing running a carbon reactor and carbon dosing.

  • A carbon reactor (with granulated activated charcoal) is a form of chemical filtration that works through ADSORPTION - the complex surface structure of the charcoal creates an environment which will chemically trap dissolved organic compounds from the water column. The devices work best with lower water flow rates (to provide more contact time between the water and the charcoal) and will eventually reach capacity and need to be changed. There is a LOT of debate about how much charcoal to use and how often to run it, but many people run a carbon reactor 24/7 using the amount of charcoal recommended by the manufacturer.
  • Carbon DOSING is a form of bacteria supplementation in which a carbon-rich media (such as bio-pellets) are used in a reactor to provide a growth medium on which heterotrophic bacteria will grow. The bacteria will them scavenge nitrogenous waste from the water column, and create non-toxic waste in the water column (which can be kept in check through regular water changes). However, the bacteria need to be added on a regular basis, and eventually the bio-pellets will also need to be replenished.
So while both methods use "carbon", they are actually two very different methods.

Since you already have charcoal in a mini reactor, your best bet is to start by running it 24/7, and changing the media every 3 weeks.

With respect to your feeding cadence, that's very hard to answer without more insight into what livestock you have in the tank.

One other thought - the one thing you haven't mentioned in your lighting schedule. Nuisance algae is often a result from too much lighting for too long of a photo period. Have you thought about this?
Thank you very much. I did start running skimmer 23hr one hr off during feeding.
I will probably change my carbon, reduce flow rate and follow recommended volume.
As far as lights that remind me I still haven't put blinds by the door. The tank do get 2-3hr of lights in the morning before gets shaded by the deck. My light schedule are attached, 2 ai prime 16hd. The highest is at 83% but I assume it gets reduced some because of my egg crate lid thats wrapped with window mesh.
Just did phosphate check and it's at 0.5 feed once since Saturday with AB+. I may pick up some phosguard and try it out.
I got 2 clown, one blenny, one fire fish, 2 cong snail? 2 turbo, 2 blue leg hermit.
 

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6lue9uy

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Most run their skimmers 24/7. This may not be necessary if less does what you want. The skimmer will remove suspended organics faster, which may not be desirable if you just broadcast fed. Experiment. I'm trying 12/12 since starting to dose phyto.
I think carbon dosing would be good to reduce nutrients and increase biodiversity.
Reef roids is high in phosphate.
Thank you. I've reset my skimmer and reactor schedule 23hr with one hr off feeding. My phosphate still going up now sitting at 0.5 only feed once ab+ in 3days. Only thing I can think of is dead Nassarius Snail, I may have seen 3 of them. And a dead/missing goby somewhere, it's been missing for almost 3weeks.
Is phyto only for pods? I've added pods from algae barn, but kept forgetting dos phyto, I suspect they all died...don't see anything moving in refugium
 
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TexanCanuck

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Most copepods are too small to see with the naked eye ... especially when viewed from the top of your refugium, so don't get too worried if you don't see them.

Dosing phyto to feed the pods will HELP, but it not critical ... it is simply a good practice if you are trying to jump-start your pod population in a new tank
 

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