Wouldn't zoanthids be stony corals?

encrustingacro

Community Member
View Badges
Joined
Aug 24, 2020
Messages
52
Reaction score
35
Location
Washington State
Wouldn't zoanthids be considered stony corals since soft corals have 8 tentacles on their polyps whereas zoanthids have them in multiples of 6 and also because zoanthids are in the order of hexacorallia which stony corals are in whereas soft corals are in the order octocorallia?
 
Tommy's Phyto

Adamantium

Valuable Member
View Badges
Joined
Sep 10, 2018
Messages
1,143
Reaction score
690
Wouldn't zoanthids be considered stony corals since soft corals have 8 tentacles on their polyps whereas zoanthids have them in multiples of 6 and also because zoanthids are in the order of hexacorallia which stony corals are in whereas soft corals are in the order octocorallia?
There is no scientific definition of LPS, SPS, or soft coral. They're just hobby terms. That said, the lack of a calcium carbonate skeleton leaves zoas pretty firmly in the soft coral category.
 

shred5

5000 Club Member
View Badges
Joined
Jun 7, 2007
Messages
6,014
Reaction score
4,323
Location
Waukesha, Wi
There is no scientific definition of LPS, SPS, or soft coral. They're just hobby terms. That said, the lack of a calcium carbonate skeleton leaves zoas pretty firmly in the soft coral category.


Agreed.
Scientific name for stony corals is Scleractinia.
 
OP
E

encrustingacro

Community Member
View Badges
Joined
Aug 24, 2020
Messages
52
Reaction score
35
Location
Washington State
I know sps and lps are not hobby terms but I always thought soft and stony corals were scientific terms. I also always thorught soft and stony corals were determined by the number of tentacles, not whether they built skeletons or not.
 

dyerrm

I stormed the castle and took some gold
View Badges
Joined
Jun 14, 2020
Messages
3,181
Reaction score
3,959
Location
Aurora
I know sps and lps are not hobby terms but I always thought soft and stony corals were scientific terms. I also always thorught soft and stony corals were determined by the number of tentacles, not whether they built skeletons or not.
Definitely based off of skeleton (or the stony part) vs no skeleton.

the way you tell the difference between alveopora and goniopra is number of tentacles
 
Budmans

shred5

5000 Club Member
View Badges
Joined
Jun 7, 2007
Messages
6,014
Reaction score
4,323
Location
Waukesha, Wi
I know sps and lps are not hobby terms but I always thought soft and stony corals were scientific terms. I also always thorught soft and stony corals were determined by the number of tentacles, not whether they built skeletons or not.

Lets see if I remember correctly from my marine biology coarse the scientific terms .

Reef building corals are Hermatypic and non reef building is Ahermatypic.

Soft and stony are just words.
 

shred5

5000 Club Member
View Badges
Joined
Jun 7, 2007
Messages
6,014
Reaction score
4,323
Location
Waukesha, Wi
then would that mean some clove polyps would be stony corals since they make skeletons?

No they are not calcium carbonate so not Scleractina.
Technically what you are saying is then gorgonia would be because they do have skeletons. They are not calcium carbonate.
 
Orphek OR3 reef aquarium LED lighting

shred5

5000 Club Member
View Badges
Joined
Jun 7, 2007
Messages
6,014
Reaction score
4,323
Location
Waukesha, Wi
Blue ridge coral has a calcium carbonate skeleton and is listed as a soft coral. FWIW.

That is a weird one in which I would also say it is reef building but I believe it does not fit because it is like pipe organ too because it really has a external skeleton.

But again soft coral really isn't scientific either.

Edit:
Yea I had to look it up Blue ridge is not considered a Scleractinia.
 
Last edited:
BRS

blasterman

Valuable Member
View Badges
Joined
Feb 14, 2019
Messages
1,042
Reaction score
1,084
Some gorgonians form calcite skeletons. Calcite is just a form of calcium carbonate that forms under low pH conditions.
 

dyerrm

I stormed the castle and took some gold
View Badges
Joined
Jun 14, 2020
Messages
3,181
Reaction score
3,959
Location
Aurora
No they are not calcium carbonate so not Scleractina.
Technically what you are saying is then gorgonia would be because they do have skeletons. They are not calcium carbonate.
I didn’t say gorganians. Not sure how those are classified. But zoas have only a soft structure nothing even close to a skeleton
 

How many tangs (surgeonfish) do you have in your reef tank?

  • 0

    Votes: 185 22.1%
  • 1

    Votes: 182 21.8%
  • 2

    Votes: 151 18.1%
  • 3

    Votes: 113 13.5%
  • 4

    Votes: 71 8.5%
  • 5+

    Votes: 129 15.4%
  • Other (please explain)

    Votes: 5 0.6%

Online statistics

Members online
1,328
Guests online
4,368
Total visitors
5,696
Top