Can I use Flux Flux and Chemiclean at the same time..?

Delatedlotus

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Just a short question.. Can I use Flux Flux and Chemiclean at the same time..? I mean by using Reef Flux for 2 weeks, then adding Chemiclean to clean up a lot of red-maroon stain..? Does this make any sense.. 48 hours after Chemiclean added, do my 20% water change...?
 
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Gareth elliott

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I would not, combine them. The possibility of low o2 would be too much for me to pull that trigger. The decaying algae from the reef flux and the effect chemiclean already has on o2.
 

wesman42

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I still would not combine both treatments. You are literally asking for trouble. Anything from dinoflagellates to nuking your tank because of low O2. I'd work on 1 thing at a time. Either stop the flux, and start chemiclean, or wait the flux out and then after use chemiclean.
 
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Delatedlotus

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Ok I will wait it out.... Good advise I must say Thank You... We all can always get so impatient, like it must be done now...lol. And I am playing with a lot of water here 350+ gallons...! It is looking so much better I have to say. GHA is just about gone, but there is some hard core bristle like stuff hanging on, very short stuff. I did add a ProFlex 4 sump and lights for cheato. NOT adding for a long while yet as dosing this will kill it ( I do know that..lol). I used to run calurpia for years. Then finely had a crash with it. Busy I suppose.. Self error. Not again... It was so cool I have to say, a picture of it.. Any advise..?. Thank you again...

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brandon429

why did you put a reef in that
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I have some diagnostic news for you based on the picture, you wont like it but there's a good side.

the good side is that live rock is quality, quality stuff and you can start the reef over while re using it.

the amounts of algae you display are what a normal healthy reef would produce, its not blanketed, but its localized in patches that urchins and parrotfish and other grazers would simply eat on a normal reef, those are lacking here so it grew and found a place it was allowed to seat.

the age of the sandbed, and the amount of detritus in the sandbed (100% full) is the fuel not only for this issue, but future ones that meds will not help with.

If you want to get the most lifespan out of this tank without having to redo it again, and reuse that fine rock, and get the coral growth you want without the algae, you need to:

1. take the entire system apart and dump all the sand and change out all the water for new. big job, big tank probs, that's the diagnosis nonetheless :)

2. while your live rock is out of the tank, hand scrape using a knife all the algae out of its anchor points. Use peroxide on the formerly invaded spots, as cleanup, detail clean the rocks/big tank probs. its dental surgery for your system.

3. set the perfectly cleaned rocks and all new water back up either on brand new sand, fully rinsed before use so there is zero clouding, or no sand at all, which is your best bet long term in a system with this much live rock. a stack that big retains detritus/its hard to keep it flushed out (which is one reason why you can only truly save the tank by taking it apart and rip cleaning it)

if you put that much rock back over that much sand, new or old, expect the same big job again one day based on the feedback your system gives regarding invasion.

if you choose to leave all the detritus in place among the rocks, and sand, and dose a water med that affects the current invader, then its decay/mass in system makes more detritus and the next invasion will come right when you fill it with expensive corals. Your sandbed has reached its max full, there's no other way to save that tank correctly, not one single other way. there are temporary ways that will leave even more detritus in place for the next set of invasions, predictably cyano, right when its matured a bit more but with corals in place. even more reason to not take it apart and clean. Your sandbed is basically elderly and packed with decay, we have to remove it all, 100% of it, to start the right way. Nothing you dose to the water can do this.

:)

sorry for big work news, nobody chooses that they'll choose the no work option we know. Here's the results, they end up cleaning anyway lol

https://www.reef2reef.com/threads/t...ead-aka-one-against-many.230281/#post-2681445

that thread= 20 pages of people once determined to never take their tanks apart, indeed being forced to take their tanks apart due to nonstop invasion, then wondering afterwards why they hesitated for years and accepted the invasion prior.

that thread= starting reefing by avoiding manual labor, and then arriving there anyway if you want to keep your money.

Manual cleaning will beat reef flux and chemi clean always, because those are target-specific dosers that work sometimes and our method is panspecific and works every time, we show. We are handling future invasions, not just the current one, and in a big tank you don't want to handle it any other way for sure.
 
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brandon429

why did you put a reef in that
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the worst part of the job is the new water makeup. if you are determined to avoid that, drain all your top water off before doing the rest, and re use it only after de clouding the rest of the substrate / rocks
 

Just John

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I have some diagnostic news for you based on the picture, you wont like it but there's a good side.

the good side is that live rock is quality, quality stuff and you can start the reef over while re using it.

the amounts of algae you display are what a normal healthy reef would produce, its not blanketed, but its localized in patches that urchins and parrotfish and other grazers would simply eat on a normal reef, those are lacking here so it grew and found a place it was allowed to seat.

the age of the sandbed, and the amount of detritus in the sandbed (100% full) is the fuel not only for this issue, but future ones that meds will not help with.

If you want to get the most lifespan out of this tank without having to redo it again, and reuse that fine rock, and get the coral growth you want without the algae, you need to:

1. take the entire system apart and dump all the sand and change out all the water for new. big job, big tank probs, that's the diagnosis nonetheless :)

2. while your live rock is out of the tank, hand scrape using a knife all the algae out of its anchor points. Use peroxide on the formerly invaded spots, as cleanup, detail clean the rocks/big tank probs. its dental surgery for your system.

3. set the perfectly cleaned rocks and all new water back up either on brand new sand, fully rinsed before use so there is zero clouding, or no sand at all, which is your best bet long term in a system with this much live rock. a stack that big retains detritus/its hard to keep it flushed out (which is one reason why you can only truly save the tank by taking it apart and rip cleaning it)

if you put that much rock back over that much sand, new or old, expect the same big job again one day based on the feedback your system gives regarding invasion.

if you choose to leave all the detritus in place among the rocks, and sand, and dose a water med that affects the current invader, then its decay/mass in system makes more detritus and the next invasion will come right when you fill it with expensive corals. Your sandbed has reached its max full, there's no other way to save that tank correctly, not one single other way. there are temporary ways that will leave even more detritus in place for the next set of invasions, predictably cyano, right when its matured a bit more but with corals in place. even more reason to not take it apart and clean. Your sandbed is basically elderly and packed with decay, we have to remove it all, 100% of it, to start the right way. Nothing you dose to the water can do this.

:)

sorry for big work news, nobody chooses that they'll choose the no work option we know. Here's the results, they end up cleaning anyway lol

https://www.reef2reef.com/threads/t...ead-aka-one-against-many.230281/#post-2681445

that thread= 20 pages of people once determined to never take their tanks apart, indeed being forced to take their tanks apart due to nonstop invasion, then wondering afterwards why they hesitated for years and accepted the invasion prior.

that thread= starting reefing by avoiding manual labor, and then arriving there anyway if you want to keep your money.

Manual cleaning will beat reef flux and chemi clean always, because those are target-specific dosers that work sometimes and our method is panspecific and works every time, we show. We are handling future invasions, not just the current one, and in a big tank you don't want to handle it any other way for sure.
I have to say that I hate it when this happens - a person spends a ton of time giving someone the advice they wanted and writing it all up, but the OP never replies, posts again, or even acknowledges that they read it. I have only been here for a couple of months, but it has happened to me a number of times already. Someone asks for something, I take the time to go get the links and take a photo of something in my tank and after that they never even bother to "like" it to show they read it. Even if they don't like what you have to say, why can't people acknowledge that they even looked at it? @brandon429 I see this happen to you all the time. It's ridiculous.
 

Lindaanne60

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I have to say that I hate it when this happens - a person spends a ton of time giving someone the advice they wanted and writing it all up, but the OP never replies, posts again, or even acknowledges that they read it. I have only been here for a couple of months, but it has happened to me a number of times already. Someone asks for something, I take the time to go get the links and take a photo of something in my tank and after that they never even bother to "like" it to show they read it. Even if they don't like what you have to say, why can't people acknowledge that they even looked at it? @brandon429 I see this happen to you all the time. It's ridiculous.
Its called being rude unfortunately.
 

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