Corals with tolerance to hight temperatures

Galeno rocha

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I live in a hot climate and my tank temperature is constantly at 84F.
I have a problem keeping SPS, even though the other parameters are ok.
They last about one or two weeks and start to STN. Chillers are cost prohibitive and have other problems.
Anyone gave kept corals at this temperature?
 

BamboozleBean

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I heard from a guy at Reefapalooza that some corals can get as low as 40 degrees but if they go over 90 they’re dead.
Not sure how accurate that is but it might be more difficult to keep coral in that climate.
In the wild corals are sometimes in tide pools that can get really warm, yet they survive.
So I would say it’s possible, but I’m not sure what would be best to put in your tank.
But if you have a sump you could run a fan over it to try and help.
 
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Galeno rocha

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I tried to use a high power 40 cm living room fan and it managed to drop about 2 degrees, but it makes a constant loud noise and would double my power bill
Aquarium fans probably would not suffice.
 

SeaDweller

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some of my friends believe a slightly warmer temp (probably no higher than 82 deg, but I don't know) helps with growth.

I never let my tank get above 81 degrees, and that's with a chiller and fans blowing across the surface. If you're positive it's only the temperature that's causing the issue, then I would either stop trying to kill them or get a chiller or use more fans to keep the temp cool, really no other way around it. I don't think you should waste your money if you know that's probably the issue?
 

Backreefing

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Your best bet is to simply get a room air conditioner. Even a simple window unit is good. And you get to enjoy the ac to .
basicly put if your not comfortable there not comfortable either.
 
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C. Eymann

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some of my friends believe a slightly warmer temp (probably no higher than 82 deg, but I don't know) helps with growth.

I never let my tank get above 81 degrees, and that's with a chiller and fans blowing across the surface. If you're positive it's only the temperature that's causing the issue, then I would either stop trying to kill them or get a chiller or use more fans to keep the temp cool, really no other way around it. I don't think you should waste your money if you know that's probably the issue?
+1

I like 78-82 degrees for SPS tanks, any higher than 82 and I start getting nervous.

79-81 is what I consider ideal, However I have seen amazing tanks that run no higher than 76.
I think consistancy is more important than if you run at 77 vs 81, however, with all biological processes, temperature is a regulating environmental variable, so lower temps may mean slower growth, but it's a double edged sword, as undesirable biological processes- parasitic metabolisms, zooanxthelle eating bacteria like brown jelly, RTN causing strains of Vibrio, undesirable algaes will happen/proliferate faster as well.

Just my .02
 
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Galeno rocha

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Once I pinpoited the problem, I wont't be adding anymore SPS or LPS. Soft corals seem unnafected, but maybe they are just hardy.

An AC unit is out of the question since the room is very large and not air thight. I also don't think that's enveromentally friedly to let such a device on 27\7.

The thing about chillers is that not only they are expensive, but they seem unreliable and power hungry. If they break down, I would not be able to provide redundancy and risk a tank crash,

I did the math and realized it's not feasible to lower the temperature. Not for this specific tank anyway,
My actual goal would be to stock with apropriate livestock. There are coral reefs in hot climates after all.

In a future tank I will tackle the problem from the begining, starting by location.
 

Pedoconfuego

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Do you have fans blowing on the sump and one on the display pointed at the water already? Fans can do a lot of work pulling down the temp.
 

SeaDweller

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Once I pinpoited the problem, I wont't be adding anymore SPS or LPS. Soft corals seem unnafected, but maybe they are just hardy.

An AC unit is out of the question since the room is very large and not air thight. I also don't think that's enveromentally friedly to let such a device on 27\7.

The thing about chillers is that not only they are expensive, but they seem unreliable and power hungry. If they break down, I would not be able to provide redundancy and risk a tank crash,

I did the math and realized it's not feasible to lower the temperature. Not for this specific tank anyway,
My actual goal would be to stock with apropriate livestock. There are coral reefs in hot climates after all.

In a future tank I will tackle the problem from the begining, starting by location.
Sure, chillers are expensive but like any good hobby anything is, really. I’ve bought a used JBJ Artica that was 6 years old at the time I bought it, used it for 3 years (until this year) and sold it. Within an hour of posting, it was gone. My buddy who was selling another brand, at the same time, couldn’t. JBJ chillers are good. I then bought a brand new one when BRS had a 10% off sale on them. I’ve owned 3 JBJ units and none have ever skipped a beat.

if you won’t try an AC unit, chiller, or multiple fans to cool the room or tank, then I guess you’ve answered your question, good luck.
 
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Galeno rocha

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On the sump only. I have a dense mesh cover on the display because of jump happy fish.

A used chiller is actually a good idea. The cheaper new ones cost about twice the what I soent on my entire system.
 

Pedoconfuego

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Do you have fans blowing on the sump and one on the display pointed at the water already? Fans can do a lot of work pulling down the temp.
Fans should be tried before chillers. 83 to 84 degrees is where I always see acropora start to have issues. I keep my tank at 75-77 degrees while it may go up to 79 at times I have had better luck with lower temps. If my temp goes above 80 I see alk consumption decrease some. While I have seen tanks run temps around 80-83 with everything ok I don’t think they liked to see temps get higher than that.
 

kireek

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I don't know of any specific SPS corals that will tolerate higher temperatures.I would stay away from deep water acros for obvious reasons.I think your best bet would be to purchase frags from local hobbyist or storefronts who are dealing with similar conditions.

Temperature

Temperature impacts reef aquarium inhabitants in a variety of ways. First and foremost, the animals' metabolic rates rise as temperature rises. They may consequently use or produce more oxygen, carbon dioxide, nutrients, calcium, and alkalinity at higher temperatures. This higher metabolic rate can also increase both their growth rate and waste production at higher temperatures.

Another important impact of temperature is on the chemical aspects of the aquarium. The solubility of dissolved gases such as oxygen and carbon dioxide, for example, change with temperature. Oxygen, in particular, can be a concern because it is less soluble at higher temperature.

So what does this imply for aquarists?

In most instances, trying to match the natural environment in a reef aquarium is a worthy goal. Temperature may, however, be a parameter that requires accounting for the practical considerations of a small closed system that might suffer a power failure and trap the organisms in a small amount of poorly aerated water, something that rarely happens on a natural reef. Looking to the ocean as a guide for setting temperatures in reef aquaria may also present complications because corals grow well in such a wide range of temperatures. The greatest variety of corals, however, are found in water whose average temperature is about 83-86° F.
During normal functioning of a reef aquarium, the oxygen level and the metabolic rate of the aquarium inhabitants are not often important issues, and many reef tanks do well with temperatures in the low to mid 80's. During a crisis such as a power failure, however, the dissolved oxygen can be rapidly used up. Lower temperatures not only allow a higher oxygen level before an emergency, but will also slow the consumption of that oxygen by slowing the metabolism of the aquarium's inhabitants. The production of ammonia as organisms begin to die may also be slower at lower temperatures. For reasons such as this, one may choose to strike a practical balance between temperatures that are too high (even if corals normally thrive in the ocean at those temperatures), and those that are too low.

These natural guidelines leave a fairly wide range of acceptable temperatures. I keep my aquarium at about 80-81° F year-round. I am actually more inclined to keep the aquarium cooler in the summer, when a power failure would most likely warm the aquarium, and higher in winter, when a power failure would most likely cool it. All things considered, I recommend temperatures in the range of 76-83° F unless there is a very clear reason to keep it outside that range.

One additional comment on temperatures: having a small temperature swing is not necessarily undesirable. While temperature stability may sound like a desirable attribute, and in some cases it may be, studies have shown that organisms that are acclimated to daily temperature swings become more able to deal with unexpected temperature excursions. So while a tank creature that normally experiences only 80° F may be very healthy, the same organism adapted to a range from 78° F to 82° F may be better able to deal with an aquarium that accidentally rises to 86° F
 

maroun.c

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I wouldn't risk it without a chiller if u live in a hot region. U might get a heat wave in couple years that would finish off years of growing ur corals. Maybe run it at 80-82 to minimize cost and avoid losses.
I picked up corals from the gulf in the middle east that make it in the wild.with temps over 86. Abd they still struggled at high temps in my tank. It's simply not the same maybe with speed things change in out tanks ....
 

NanoDJS

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Ive seen people run their water through a bucket that has a "swamp cooler " with fresh water evap method running inside that it should help cool the tank down but would need the evap water replenished often. this will focus the cooling on the water from the tank only .
 
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