Dino

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Gtinnel

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I am starting to get what I'm almost positive is some kind of Dino in my tank, I don't have a microscope so I can't identify what kind. It hasn't became a big issue it's basically just strings of it on my back glass, but I'm wanting to deal with it before it does become a problem. If my memory is correct (which it may not be) Dinos usually start when the nutrients (nitrate and/or phosphate) are at zero. Several articles I've just read say it is excessive nutrients that lead to dinos.

So to fight off dinos am I trying to reduce or increase nutrients?

Currently my tank is at 2ppm nitrate and .05ppm phosphate.
 

vetteguy53081

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Here is a sure bet: First- Check phosphates and nitrates to assure theyre not elevated.
Here is full program:
Prepare by starting with a water change and blow this stuff loose with a turkey baster and siphon up loose particles.
Turn lights off (at least white and run blue at 10-15%) for 5 days and at night dose 1ml of hydrogen peroxide per 10 gallons for all 5 nights. If you dont have light dependent coral- turn all lights off.
During the day dose 1ml of liquid bacteria (such as bacter 7) per 10 gallons.
Clean filters daily and DO NOT FEED CORAL FOODS OR ADD NOPOX as it is food for dinos.
Day 5,, you can start with blue lights - ramping up and work your white lights up slowly
 

Twillyg21

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It can be beat without chemical additions like peroxide- nothing against that advice, but it is risky, especially if you aren’t exact with dosing amounts.

In my experience and in reality, dinos aren’t a result of either high or low nutrients, but a lack of biodiversity or a disruption of biodiversity.

Dinos are resilient in systems that are unstable, or new tanks with low or no biodiversity, but are easily beaten down and eradicated in a biodiverse environment where they are in competition with biodiversity that outnumbers and outcompetes the dinos.

Increase your biodiversity by adding a bunch, I mean a BUNCH of copepods along with daily dosing of live phytoplankton to add diversity and to feed/help increase pod populations. I would also add more bio filtration by adding more porous material with a lot of surface area and then dose bacteria like MB7 daily following the instructions on the bottle for your tank volume. Better still, get a bunch of bio media and put it in a bucket filled with water from your tank, put in an air stone for oxygen rich environment. Dump in the mb7 dose suitable for your tank volume, and add a small amount of a carbon source (bio fuel, vodka, vinegar, etc) and let the “bath” sit/run for 24 hours. Then add the media to your sump along with the water it was soaking in. - turn your skimmer and UV off for a few hours too. Continue to dose bacteria daily according to instructions for at least 10 days.

That combination will give your biodiversity a fighting chance to destroy your Dino problems and establish a healthy, stable tank in the process! :)

I like the idea of dosing bacteria, in fact, Dr Tim’s Dino treatment program utilizes a bacteria and blackout approach (see attached picture of instructions from the products)

The fastest option is probably the Dr Tim’s route, but you may lose some snails/crabs/possibly shrimp in the process.

Otherwise, use the approach of increasing your biodiversity, add a UV, and run a blackout period for 3 days and repeat weekly until the problem is solved. Your corals will be fine without light for 3 days.

hope this helps!
 

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Gtinnel

Gtinnel

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It can be beat without chemical additions like peroxide- nothing against that advice, but it is risky, especially if you aren’t exact with dosing amounts.

In my experience and in reality, dinos aren’t a result of either high or low nutrients, but a lack of biodiversity or a disruption of biodiversity.

Dinos are resilient in systems that are unstable, or new tanks with low or no biodiversity, but are easily beaten down and eradicated in a biodiverse environment where they are in competition with biodiversity that outnumbers and outcompetes the dinos.

Increase your biodiversity by adding a bunch, I mean a BUNCH of copepods along with daily dosing of live phytoplankton to add diversity and to feed/help increase pod populations. I would also add more bio filtration by adding more porous material with a lot of surface area and then dose bacteria like MB7 daily following the instructions on the bottle for your tank volume. Better still, get a bunch of bio media and put it in a bucket filled with water from your tank, put in an air stone for oxygen rich environment. Dump in the mb7 dose suitable for your tank volume, and add a small amount of a carbon source (bio fuel, vodka, vinegar, etc) and let the “bath” sit/run for 24 hours. Then add the media to your sump along with the water it was soaking in. - turn your skimmer and UV off for a few hours too. Continue to dose bacteria daily according to instructions for at least 10 days.

That combination will give your biodiversity a fighting chance to destroy your Dino problems and establish a healthy, stable tank in the process! :)

I like the idea of dosing bacteria, in fact, Dr Tim’s Dino treatment program utilizes a bacteria and blackout approach (see attached picture of instructions from the products)

The fastest option is probably the Dr Tim’s route, but you may lose some snails/crabs/possibly shrimp in the process.

Otherwise, use the approach of increasing your biodiversity, add a UV, and run a blackout period for 3 days and repeat weekly until the problem is solved. Your corals will be fine without light for 3 days.

hope this helps!
It's actually already gone away. Ive had it before in the past and it became a big issue but luckily I only had a few corals then. My tank has since matured greatly and I have way more corals. I didn't expect it to be a big issue this time, but I'm amazed at the contradictory information that you will find online. While I agree that biodiversity is the main issue you will read some people online say it's spurred by low nitrate and/or phosphate and other people say it's because of high nitrate and/or phosphate. I still don't have any idea if someone who gets Dinos should be trying to raise or lower "nutrients", in addition to increasing bio diversity. Thanks for info though
 

Rubblereefer

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It's actually already gone away. Ive had it before in the past and it became a big issue but luckily I only had a few corals then. My tank has since matured greatly and I have way more corals. I didn't expect it to be a big issue this time, but I'm amazed at the contradictory information that you will find online. While I agree that biodiversity is the main issue you will read some people online say it's spurred by low nitrate and/or phosphate and other people say it's because of high nitrate and/or phosphate. I still don't have any idea if someone who gets Dinos should be trying to raise or lower "nutrients", in addition to increasing bio diversity. Thanks for info though
From my research and experience it is 10x more likely to be low nutrients than high. Lots of undesirable algae etc can thrive in high nutrient environments, but low nutrients give Dino’s an edge
 
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