Dinos* targeting coral?

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mfollen

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Has anyone seen cyano bacteria tend to target, potentially attack or at least drawn to mushroom coral or other coral?

I’ve seen this happen to other mushroom, but the mushroom looks great, all of a sudden some cyano appears next to it, cyano grows a little, doesn’t cover over the coral or anything like that, then bam mushroom is not happy with what appears to be it being attacked by the cyano. Possibly the cyano is targeting some decaying matter... or the coral.. regardless this is not the first I’ve seen this with some of my mushroom coral.
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Anyone else see this happen in their reefs?
 
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Ghost25

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Yes I've seen it before when I was just starting my first tank and introduced some frags. My guess is that the cyano itself hitchhiked on the frag. In the previous owner system cyano probably didn't grow at all but in my water it did.

I've seen the same thing when I introduced a small rock with zoas to my system. When I got it it had almost no algae and within a couple weeks of being on my sand bed it became covered in hair algae despite my rocks next to it having almost none.
 
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mfollen

mfollen

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@javisaman nice catch I agree now that I think about it. Ok, has anyone seen dinoflagellates target coral? I’ll do some googling...
 
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mfollen

mfollen

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This is an established system 2+ years and has established nutrient levels. These dinos have never been a problem like this. More pics of other cases:
 

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javisaman

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Sorry, I seem to be vacillating on what I think it is. The latter pictures, with the deeper red, look like it could be cyano. Does it siphon off easily? Do NOT blow them off in case they are dinos.
 
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mfollen

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They blow off easy like a mat, which is why I first thought cyano.. But the bubbles do seem very Dino-esque.

Unfortunately I did just blow them off gently to give the mushrooms some needed space to hopefully recover.

I can try and get an ID w/ a microscope sometime this weekend.

But I can’t figure why they grow specifically around the mushrooms as if they’re targeting them or a weakened decaying edge of the foot or edge.
 

javisaman

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I suspect it's more cyano now. Cyano can have bubbles too as they produce O2 under the mats. I would look at getting more flow around the area where you're seeing the cyano. Also, what are your parameters?
 

vetteguy53081

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Its definitely cyano. Cyano blooms typically start when water nutrient concentrations go haywire. Just like when you eat too much sugar and your waistline starts to bloom, the same happens in your tank when concentrations of phosphate, nitrate and other organic compounds are too high.
Some of the most common causes include:
- Protein skimmer which fills water with tiny air bubbles. As bubbles form from the reaction chamber, dissolved organic compound molecules stick to them. Foam forms at the surface of the water and is then transferred to a collection cup, where it rests as skimmate
- Overstocking / overfeeding, your aquarium with nutrients is often the culprit of a cyano bloom
- Adding live rock that isn’t completely cured which acts like a breeding ground for red slime algae
- If you don’t change your water with enough frequency, you’ll soon have a brightly colored red slime algae bloom. Regular water changes dilute nutrients that feed cyanobacteria and keeps your tank beautifully clear
- Using a water source with nitrates or phosphates is like rolling out the welcome mat for cyano. Tap water is an example
- Inadequate water flow, or movement, is a leading cause of cyano blooms. Slow moving water combined with excess dissolved nutrients is a recipe for pervasive red slime algae development

I recommend to reduce white light intensity or even turn them off for 5-7 days. Add liquid bacteria daily for a week during the day at 1.5ml per 10 gallons. Add Hydrogen peroxide at night at 1ml per 10 gallons. Add a pouch of chemipure Elite which will balance phos and nitrate and keep them in check.

After the week, add a few snails such as cerith, margarita, astrea and nassarius plus 6-8 blue leg hermits to take control.
 
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