Disappointed in Instant Ocean

Mywifeisgunnakillme

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I don't tend to agree that it takes any time to "mix" once it is clear.

Just my experience that 48 hours is what it takes to mix and clear in my 30 gallon tub with a powerhead and heater. Sensitive corals slime up or otherwise react negatively orherwise when i did otherwise.

I leave it for a week usually, now. I'm no chemist, and have killed enough corals to be cautious about such things.

In other words, it certainly does not hurt to allow 48 hours or longer, and im cautiousand patient on all coral related things--or at least strive to be! Lol.

BRS video show it's not mixed, i.e., clear, in 24 hours, at least for their set up. That was enough confirmation for me to wait longer...
 
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DDenny

DDenny

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After 36 hours of mixing numbers were still the same Alk actually crept up only 0.2 so no big deal. We will see never used any other salt but never had a reef tank thank I was thinking of putting Stoney coral in either. Did measure pH and that was 8.2 this morning in both tank and mixing tub. Will have to think about this a little at 1 gallon weekly water changes not like I’m using a lot of salt and a small bag last a while. Time will tell. Giving the tank another 2-3 weeks any way so I have a little time to figure it out. Thanks for everyone’s information and input.
 

midgetracer

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I like to mix in a 5 gallon brew bucket with a power head and heater let it run for 4 to 5 days before water change so basically once I do a water change on Sunday I start my new mix the same day for the following Sunday ! I’m using instant ocean now but switching to reef crystals when it’s used up
 

DucatiGtr

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I’ve tried all salts through the years..
I use plain old IO now and I control all parameters w dosers... my corals are perfect and it’s super cheap. I just bought 6 boxes
 
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Auflyfish

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did you mix the salt up before adding it to water? I recently learned the importance of mixing the salt before adding it to water it has made a world of difference and I have had better results in testing my new mixed SW
 

arking_mark

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There are a ton of threads on salt mixes. Generally speaking you can be successful with most of the branded salts.

There are real world cost analysis that will show you true cost of each salt.

Most salts (all the ones I've used IO, IO RC, Neomarine, TMP) leave some residuals, with IO RC being my worst and TMP being the best.

From a parameters standpoint, the elevated parameters salts are better suited for aquarist who would prefer just to use water changes to keep parameters steady. Otherwise, I recommend using a salt that matches your water change and dosing regiment. I personally use a salt that mixes lower than my desired alkalinity as I want to slightly elevate Alk, CA, and pH using Kalkwasser. However, my daily 1% AWC in reality will contribute little to this approach mathematically speaking...but every little bit helps...
 
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homer1475

Figuring out the hobby one coral at a time.
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if your not comfortable with using acid. I believe Seachem makes an acid buffer for planted tanks that will lower alkalinity. But again, you need to let it mix for a while to blow off the excess Co2, and bring the PH back up
 
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DDenny

DDenny

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if your not comfortable with using acid. I believe Seachem makes an acid buffer for planted tanks that will lower alkalinity. But again, you need to let it mix for a while to blow off the excess Co2, and bring the PH back up
Not worried about working with acid would only need like 0.3ml per gallon to get it 8.5 or so with Muriatic Acid. Have it in the shop already. Just curious is all.
 

brandon429

why did you put a reef in that
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you mentioned pico

this pico here is my friends, we think it might be the top pico reef in the world. it uses io :) and then occasionally reef crystals. we text about reef specific issues pertaining to bowls and vases, ive been tracking this reef just about weekly for eight years.



no dosing. it will run your pico as is, with that degree of top shelf sps in tow.

in a four gallon you'd have to spend $3k to overcome the coral loading that 1.5 gallon setup sees.

so for a long, long time and most likely the entire lifespan of the 4g pico, weekly water changes to any degree using IO will produce those results above.

the feed that bowl gets is solely benepets feed. amazing.. its a powdered feed.
 

Piranhapat

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We can talk for days on salts. I tried everyone and really don't notice a difference. Only thing I see is more money in my wallet on IO. Petco having a sale $12.61 for 50 gallons and 160 gallon for 39.99. All you have to do should cashier online site price they match it.
 
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Randy Holmes-Farley

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Just my experience that 48 hours is what it takes to mix and clear in my 30 gallon tub with a powerhead and heater. Sensitive corals slime up or otherwise react negatively orherwise when i did otherwise.

I leave it for a week usually, now. I'm no chemist, and have killed enough corals to be cautious about such things.

In other words, it certainly does not hurt to allow 48 hours or longer, and im cautiousand patient on all coral related things--or at least strive to be! Lol.

BRS video show it's not mixed, i.e., clear, in 24 hours, at least for their set up. That was enough confirmation for me to wait longer...

As long as you are not getting excessive precipitation from the heating applied by the heaters and pumps (Red Sea specifically warns against this ongoing mixing for that reason), it's certainly fine to mix it as long as you want.

But from a chemistry perspective, dissolution can be fully completed in 5 minutes with enough power mixing. There is no inherently slow process involved in that step


How to Mix a Batch of Synthetic Seawater in Under Five Minutes

Regardless of one’s philosophy toward water changes in marine aquaria, at one time or another most of us have had to mix a batch of synthetic seawater. I feel secure in stating that most of you have probably felt that this process took longer than you would have liked, and you might not have been satisfied with the results. The purpose of this column is to introduce a new technique for rapidly mixing synthetic seawater, and to provide general scientific advice on that process.
 

Randy Holmes-Farley

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I read that white vinegar will reduce Alk as well anyone know how much or is the muriatic acid the better route?

As noted, vinegar does not work.

Both sodium bisulfate and hydrochloric (muriatic) are the acids folks use.
 

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