Do I Need Floor Supporting?!?

One of the questions that is inevitably asked in every aquarium chat room, newsgroup and bulletin board is "just how large an aquarium can my...
  1. kalare

    kalare Well-Known Member

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    Do you live on the first floor? If you live on a floor above, the concrete is very thin and only there for sound dampening...that is of course unless your building is a reinforced concrete building. I'm generally working on the assumption that you're in a wood framed building. However, in either case, I believe in your case you'll be fine, fill that tank up!
     
  2. Gustavo Martinez

    Gustavo Martinez Well-Known Member

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    Awesome write up and advice... I cant wait to go look at my floor in my basement after work, lol... Im going to be setting up a 55g Hexagon, sitting on a 36" stand towards the front of the house in the corner, so I think It should be ok. But doesn't hurt to add some support just in case....
     
  3. kalare

    kalare Well-Known Member

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    55g in a corner will, as you said, most likely (99%) be fine. Of course, feel free to post back with some framing information for a more solid answer.
     
  4. Caleb740

    Caleb740 Active Member

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    Old, but a great read! Needed this information for my new setup! Thanks.
     
  5. Robert Baumer

    Robert Baumer Member

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    Does anyone know of crawl space support ideas? I have maybe 40" from the cement slab to the base of the 2x10's in my family room and I am looking for ways to build up the floor safely?
     
  6. Scotch57

    Scotch57 Member

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    Menards has floor jacks
     
  7. kalare

    kalare Well-Known Member

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    To properly reinforce the floor (assuming you've verified that the existing framing is inadequate) I would suggest pouring new concrete footings on compacted soil, and providing new 4x4 (or appropriate size for your framing) posts to shorten the spans of the beams/joists. Note that you'll want to be sure no wood is within 6 inches of soil, to avoid rot and termite. You'll also want a minimum of 12" below beams and 18" below joists, to allow for a person to crawl around down there if necessary...all code requirements.

    Also note, I would not just place cinder blocks on uncompacted soil, as that soil WILL settle, and the tank could possible become out of level. I would also not use temporary jacks as they may become dislodged during a seismic event, or if any animal bumps them, or for any number of other reasons, then your floor could fail. Do it once and do it right.
     
  8. Robert Baumer

    Robert Baumer Member

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    This is what I hope to do, since one side of my floor joists terminate on top of a 10" concrete footer I believe I am safe on that side. I will come out about 30" inches from that footer and place a 6x4 perpendicular to the joist supporting the tank, both against the joists and then one on the cement. I will then use 3 36" jacks that can withstand a compression load of 16,000 lbs. I believe this should be sufficient to support the weight of the tank, water, rock, sump, and of course my stand.... comments welcomed... I have to do this right the first time, failure is not an option.

    IMG_0021.JPG
     
  9. kalare

    kalare Well-Known Member

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    I'd have to see a diagram of what you want to do to be really sure, but it sounds like you plan on introducing an intermediate support for the floor joists at approximately 30" off the wall, which is supported directly on concrete foundation.

    In either case, see what I said above about jacks, I would absolutely not use them as a permanent solution. I'd install that 4x6 perpendicular to the joists (long dimension should be vertical) and then install new 4x4 posts in lieu of jacks. Use proper clips, post caps and post bases to attach the members together. You should be able to find Simpson StrongTie or USP products at your local home improvement store. The new 4x4 posts should absolutely be installed into a proper footing on compacted soil...see my comment above regarding soil settlement and floor jacks.
     
  10. MontereyDNA

    MontereyDNA Well-Known Member

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    If, as you say, "failure is not an option" I'd contact a structural engineer for an on site consult.

    I think we all mean well providing advice online but an engineer can take everything into account and make it bullet proof.
     

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