Need help to identify if this snail is good or bad?

NoobReeferMom

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Please if anyone could let me know, I found a small snail on my newly bought chalice frag, there's plenty of snails in these tanks at the LFS where I purchased it from... Could someone pls help me identify it & let me know if it's good or bad??

Thank You so much.

IMG_20201128_065904~2.jpg
 
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Subsea

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Welcome to the addiction. I have been hooked for 50 years.

I can’t identify the species, but it looks beneficial to me. Does your LFS have a good reputation?
 

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Please if anyone could let me know, I found a small snail on my newly bought chalice frag, there's plenty of snails in these tanks at the LFS where I purchased it from... Could someone pls help me identify it & let me know if it's good or bad??

Thank You so much.

IMG_20201128_065904~2.jpg
Appears to be a colonists, small grazer/ herbivore, good guy.
 

Subsea

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Sorry, dang spellcheck. Meant collonista.


Collonista Snail
Invert Type: Snails
Scientific Name: Collonista spp, Leptothyra spp
Diet: Algae
Reef Safe: Yes
Aggressiveness: Peaceful
Relative Care: Easy
Photo Courtesy of: By Jan Delsing - http://www.biolib.cz/en/image/id100365/, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=34240607

These adorable little Collonista snails are often mistaken for baby Turbo snails, but they are a different species. These common hitchhikers only grow to about 1/4″ and reproduce in captivity easily. They are great at eating algae and even eat some species of algae that are difficult to get rid of. The only downside is that they may clog pumps and equipment if their population is allowed to go unchecked.
 
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NoobReeferMom

NoobReeferMom

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Welcome to the addiction. I have been hooked for 50 years.

I can’t identify the species, but it looks beneficial to me. Does your LFS have a good reputation?

Uh well their corals have lots of pests like bristleworms, etc I've seen plenty of things come off on a coral dip as well as aptasia, and they don't quarantine anything before selling it so I would say no probably...
 

Subsea

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I consider bristle worms as beneficial detrivores with a very, very small list of fire worms in their group.

If pest are a major concern, then dip & quarantine makes sense.

Welcome to r2r.
 
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NoobReeferMom

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I consider bristle worms as beneficial detrivores with a very, very small list of fire worms in their group.

If pest are a major concern, then dip & quarantine makes sense.

Welcome to r2r.
Yes, I have already a fairly large bristleworm, I had gotten a nice mushroom coral at LFS which is on a snail she'll with bunch of baby shrooms too I dipped it But, I know I saw a worm inside of the shell before dipping and I couldnt get it out yet... Any tips I had to just place the shell in a bowl floating in my tank for warmth and light temporarily though... Can't identify that yet though.
 
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NoobReeferMom

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Collonista Snail
Invert Type: Snails
Scientific Name: Collonista spp, Leptothyra spp
Diet: Algae
Reef Safe: Yes
Aggressiveness: Peaceful
Relative Care: Easy
Photo Courtesy of: By Jan Delsing - http://www.biolib.cz/en/image/id100365/, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=34240607

These adorable little Collonista snails are often mistaken for baby Turbo snails, but they are a different species. These common hitchhikers only grow to about 1/4″ and reproduce in captivity easily. They are great at eating algae and even eat some species of algae that are difficult to get rid of. The only downside is that they may clog pumps and equipment if their population is allowed to go unchecked.
Thank u so much.
 

Subsea

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Yes, I have already a fairly large bristleworm, I had gotten a nice mushroom coral at LFS which is on a snail she'll with bunch of baby shrooms too I dipped it But, I know I saw a worm inside of the shell before dipping and I couldnt get it out yet... Any tips I had to just place the shell in a bowl floating in my tank for warmth and light temporarily though... Can't identify that yet though.

For sanitizing coral, I use 10 minute dip in 10% solution of 3% hydrogen peroxide.

I like the idea of qt/observation in bowl floating in display.
 
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For sanitizing coral, I use 10 minute dip in 10% solution of 3% hydrogen peroxide.

I like the idea of qt/observation in bowl floating in display.
Awesome yeah it's a great idea! Just no flow sadly but it's a great temporary idea for some things
 

Subsea

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Awesome yeah it's a great idea! Just no flow sadly but it's a great temporary idea for some things

Yes, it is temporary but temporary could be stretched out to a week with several water replacement during the day at time of inspection.

Considering that you are focused on pest that can be seen with naked eye, consider a fine messed breeding basket in the tank
 

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Never thought I'd see the day where bristleworms suddenly became something people would avoid. When and how did that trend even start? They've always been a longed for and beneficial member of the aquarium microcosm...

Yikes. What's next, no water?
 
BRS

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Please if anyone could let me know, I found a small snail on my newly bought chalice frag, there's plenty of snails in these tanks at the LFS where I purchased it from... Could someone pls help me identify it & let me know if it's good or bad??

Thank You so much.

IMG_20201128_065904~2.jpg

Welcome to the channel.
 

Subsea

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Wait are there bad snails?



This species of sea snails can be such a nuisance because vermetid snails are harmful to both corals and fish tank owners’ budget as our experts have often pointed out. The snails latch onto corals’ spongy and irregular surface and they can stunt their skeletal development. What’s more, they can suck the life out of corals and kill them. Luckily, there are ways to fight them off!
 

dyerrm

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This species of sea snails can be such a nuisance because vermetid snails are harmful to both corals and fish tank owners’ budget as our experts have often pointed out. The snails latch onto corals’ spongy and irregular surface and they can stunt their skeletal development. What’s more, they can suck the life out of corals and kill them. Luckily, there are ways to fight them off!
Well those but I was referring more to the ones we find crawling around on things not ones that grown in tubes
 

Fish_Sticks

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This species of sea snails can be such a nuisance because vermetid snails are harmful to both corals and fish tank owners’ budget as our experts have often pointed out. The snails latch onto corals’ spongy and irregular surface and they can stunt their skeletal development. What’s more, they can suck the life out of corals and kill them. Luckily, there are ways to fight them off!

This is a gross overexageration, inline, with this new sterilization trend the reef community seems to be on.

Vermitids populate rocks and release a thin thread of mucus when the tank is fed, or the sand bed is stirred. This mucus catches food, detritus, and undisolved nutrients - 60% of which end up being eaten by the vermitid, the other inch, or 40% detaches and is eaten by corals.

The amount of misinformation and lack of critical thinking in reefing trends is truly baffling.

You guys will parrot anything BRS makes a video on and feed the endless cycle of trending scares.

Four years ago everyone was trying to reach zero nitrates because nitrates were bad. Now yall are dosing nitrates because, apparently, nitrates being beneficial to corals is 'new knowledge'. Yikes.

This year its hitchhiker sterilization and having only 3lbs of 'muh real ocean' live rock in a 1,200$ 50g cube tank because muh minimalist aquascapes. Those tanks wont be up in 2 years, because anyone who's reefed for longer than a month knows how important rock is.

Trends in this hobby never cease to surprise me, and, how they divert from everything we learned in the hobby is truly baffling.

Cant wait to see everyone dosing vermitid eggs in 2024.
 
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