pH And The Reef Aquarium

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Randy Holmes-Farley

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PH And The Reef Aquarium

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For many aquarists, pH is not something that they have much experience with aside from their aquarium. For many, pH is almost a black box measurement: something to be considered, but whose physical meaning makes little sense to them. This article will describe pH in an intuitive way (as opposed to a more rigorous, mathematical way that I have used in previous articles). While plenty of chemical...
Read more about this article here...
 
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Jason2.5

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Good Day Randy

Absolutely love your articles the help me so much thank you.

I got a bit confused with where you start talking about how to reduce high ph by more aeration... “The most benign way to reduce high pH is to aerate the water more.”

Am I correct if you ment aeration with Co2 so that it can turn into carbonic acid?
 

Gareth elliott

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Hi randy, great article as usual :)

i see the one study on ph and corals involves porites. Was this study also conducted with other corals. I only ask as porites biologically is a little different than many hard corals; where it is able to maintain an internal ph higher than the surrounding waters. https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/08/160804135434.htm

Do the same observations over the studied ph levels occur with acropora or pocilopora that make up the bulk of normal seawater ph reefs?
 
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Randy Holmes-Farley

Randy Holmes-Farley

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Good Day Randy

Absolutely love your articles the help me so much thank you.

I got a bit confused with where you start talking about how to reduce high ph by more aeration... “The most benign way to reduce high pH is to aerate the water more.”

Am I correct if you ment aeration with Co2 so that it can turn into carbonic acid?
I meant with normal air that contains at least a normal, if not elevated amount of CO2. The pH will drop back to normal levels for the alkalinity.
 
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Randy Holmes-Farley

Randy Holmes-Farley

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Hi randy, great article as usual :)

i see the one study on ph and corals involves porites. Was this study also conducted with other corals. I only ask as porites biologically is a little different than many hard corals; where it is able to maintain an internal ph higher than the surrounding waters. https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/08/160804135434.htm

Do the same observations over the studied ph levels occur with acropora or pocilopora that make up the bulk of normal seawater ph reefs?
I wrote this article a long time ago and at theat time I mentioned all studies I was aware of. Since that time there have been more studies with more corals and more complicated analyses, such as the pH minimum vs the average etc. I think the sum of all of these studies suggests that corals can calcify faster at higher pH, but perhaps to pH does not need to be higher 24/7. I do not recall which exact species have been studied.
 
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