Starting a second tank - Best Method???

BRS

SauceyReef

Active Member
View Badges
Joined
Mar 23, 2021
Messages
329
Reaction score
355
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
Location
Akron, Ohio
Hello! I am starting another Nano peninsula tank - a WaterBox 15.2. I would like to use the old water change water from my previous tank and slowly fill up the new one. How long can water go stagnant before it goes "bad"? Theoretically I can just keep a small heater and powerhead in the new tank, and the water will stay clean and cured - correct? Any advice/suggestions?
 
Reef Chasers Aquaculture

parkwaytrash

Community Member
View Badges
Joined
Jul 27, 2019
Messages
28
Reaction score
24
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
Location
gulf coast
Im interested as well.
I'm seeding rock in 1tank and setting up another while another has been up for a while

I've been using the water from existing tank to fill seeding tank. And will probably do the same for the new tank when I start cycling it
 
OP
SauceyReef

SauceyReef

Active Member
View Badges
Joined
Mar 23, 2021
Messages
329
Reaction score
355
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
Location
Akron, Ohio
Im interested as well.
I'm seeding rock in 1tank and setting up another while another has been up for a while

I've been using the water from existing tank to fill seeding tank. And will probably do the same for the new tank when I start cycling it
Hello thank you for following. Hopefully some others can chime in with their experience.
 

LiveFreeAndReef

Well-Known Member
View Badges
Joined
Jul 8, 2021
Messages
594
Reaction score
715
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
Location
New Hampshire
Hello! I am starting another Nano peninsula tank - a WaterBox 15.2. I would like to use the old water change water from my previous tank and slowly fill up the new one. How long can water go stagnant before it goes "bad"? Theoretically I can just keep a small heater and powerhead in the new tank, and the water will stay clean and cured - correct? Any advice/suggestions?
What is the goal of using the old water? If its for cycling the new tank I feel like moving some rock from the established tank to the new one accomplishes this easily. I've used bio-media to do this as well. The majority of your beneficial bacteria is on surfaces in the tank, not floating free in the water column
 

parkwaytrash

Community Member
View Badges
Joined
Jul 27, 2019
Messages
28
Reaction score
24
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
Location
gulf coast
What is the goal of using the old water? If its for cycling the new tank I feel like moving some rock from the established tank to the new one accomplishes this easily. I've used bio-media to do this as well. The majority of your beneficial bacteria is on surfaces in the tank, not floating free in the water column
I'm thinking the using "old water" is because it's probably a waste to use freshly made salt water just to go through a cycle and end up with a big water change tossing the water anyway

However! I'm from the old school of aquarium world where tossing a market shrimp in the water to start the cycle then needing to do a huge water change

I will be attempting a "turbo start" in a bottle this time around so not sure (still reading) about the water change doing it that way
 
Aquarium Specialty - dry goods & marine livestock
OP
SauceyReef

SauceyReef

Active Member
View Badges
Joined
Mar 23, 2021
Messages
329
Reaction score
355
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
Location
Akron, Ohio
Yes correct! My idea was not to have to use a whole new batch of salt water plus possibly expedite the cycling process. I was also going to add some cycled rock and sand from my last tank (just a small chunk each).
 

Lasse

7500 Club Member
View Badges
Joined
Mar 20, 2016
Messages
8,404
Reaction score
24,353
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
Location
Källarliden 14 D Bohus, Sweden
To use old water is a good idea in many aspects. One - often overlooked reason is that old water contain many biological active substances that protects the mucus layer of the fish. It also content particles with nitrifying bacteria attached on. New mixed saltwater is - IMO - very often too chemical for the well-being of the fish. If you mix 75 % old and 25 new - it will be as you did a 25 % WC on your old aquarium. I would also transfer some sand and rocks to the new started aquarium. Start your feeding of the new inhabitants very slowly and you can ad them directly.

If you heat and have the water in motion (with a pump) - it could be there for ever.

This is the way I always have done when starting new aquariums if I have an old well function aquarium on hand,

Sincerely Lasse
 

parkwaytrash

Community Member
View Badges
Joined
Jul 27, 2019
Messages
28
Reaction score
24
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
Location
gulf coast
To use old water is a good idea in many aspects. One - often overlooked reason is that old water contain many biological active substances that protects the mucus layer of the fish. It also content particles with nitrifying bacteria attached on. New mixed saltwater is - IMO - very often too chemical for the well-being of the fish. If you mix 75 % old and 25 new - it will be as you did a 25 % WC on your old aquarium. I would also transfer some sand and rocks to the new started aquarium. Start your feeding of the new inhabitants very slowly and you can ad them directly.

If you heat and have the water in motion (with a pump) - it could be there for ever.

This is the way I always have done when starting new aquariums if I have an old well function aquarium on hand,

Sincerely Lasse
I like the way you think!
 
Maxout
BRS

PICK the Most Tested & Least Tested Parameters of your Tank (Pick 2)

  • Calcium (most)

    Votes: 47 6.3%
  • Alkalinity (most)

    Votes: 521 69.6%
  • Magnesium (most)

    Votes: 6 0.8%
  • Phosphate (most)

    Votes: 70 9.3%
  • PH (most)

    Votes: 72 9.6%
  • Nitrate (most)

    Votes: 75 10.0%
  • Nitrite (most)

    Votes: 6 0.8%
  • Ammonia (most)

    Votes: 21 2.8%
  • (least) Calcium

    Votes: 10 1.3%
  • (least) Alkalinity

    Votes: 4 0.5%
  • (least) Magnesium

    Votes: 72 9.6%
  • (least) Phosphate

    Votes: 15 2.0%
  • (least) PH

    Votes: 40 5.3%
  • (least) Nitrate

    Votes: 13 1.7%
  • (least) Nitrite

    Votes: 210 28.0%
  • (least) Ammonia

    Votes: 282 37.7%
http://www.marcorocks.com/
Top