Tank pH at night is 7.49 and nothing makes sense, I guess 7.5 is perfectly healthy for a reef?

https://www.triton.de/en/

Randy Holmes-Farley

Reef Chemist
View Badges
Joined
Sep 5, 2014
Messages
42,205
Reaction score
30,553
Location
Arlington, Massachusetts, United States
Yes, how far away is “away”? I am testing as far as my probe reaches about 3 ft away.

Two issues are out of the tank water to avoid ground loop issues, and cords away from lights and things.

You are avoiding the former, maybe not the latter.

But you are measuring the outdoor and and indoor air aeration tests this way? And when you take tank water out and measure it that same way, right away, you get low levels like 7.5 still?
 
BRS
OP
2Wheelsonly

2Wheelsonly

Valuable Member
View Badges
Joined
Feb 22, 2017
Messages
1,238
Reaction score
1,634
Location
Floyds Knobs, IN
Can’t use probe outside so I test it with my Salifert kit that seems to match the pH probe as it’s easy to tell when it’s below 7.7 drastically.

edit: the Salifert pH test kit is consistent with my probe and fairly easy to read. At pH 8.0 it’s a nice deep forest green, at 7.7 it’s pastel green and anything below 7.7 just goes yellow.
 

Miller535

Valuable Member
View Badges
Joined
Dec 11, 2019
Messages
2,148
Reaction score
1,841
Location
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
I ordered a secondary chamber that I will fill with crushed coral. I can’t think dripping 90ml per minute of pH 6.4 water directly from my calcium reactor is helping things.

To me it sounds like this is the cause. 90 ml of 6.4 effluent is a lot. I mean 90ml x 1440 mins in a day, that's 129,600 ml in a day, or about 34 gallons. Darn close to 10 percent of your tank's water volume.
 
Fritz

Randy Holmes-Farley

Reef Chemist
View Badges
Joined
Sep 5, 2014
Messages
42,205
Reaction score
30,553
Location
Arlington, Massachusetts, United States
Yes it is.

OK, then it is clear the aquarium water needs more aeration to blow off the excess CO2. It may also be approached by adding less, as noted above.

Open any closed areas (like a sump (or blow fresh air into it).

Make sure the skimmer is sucking as much air as it can (no inhibition on the air inlet).
 

duesmortem

Community Member
View Badges
Joined
Oct 7, 2020
Messages
32
Reaction score
10
Location
Bergen County
I have tried using SeaChem's pH buffer to bring up the pH in my tank but it has been a very gradual process and my tank really wants to keep lowering the pH even after significant and consistent water changes.
 

Randy Holmes-Farley

Reef Chemist
View Badges
Joined
Sep 5, 2014
Messages
42,205
Reaction score
30,553
Location
Arlington, Massachusetts, United States
I have tried using SeaChem's pH buffer to bring up the pH in my tank but it has been a very gradual process and my tank really wants to keep lowering the pH even after significant and consistent water changes.

ALL "buffers" are alkalinity supplements, and these sorts of buffers don't even have the most pH boost per unit of alkalintiy added.
 
Lazys Coral House

Randy Holmes-Farley

Reef Chemist
View Badges
Joined
Sep 5, 2014
Messages
42,205
Reaction score
30,553
Location
Arlington, Massachusetts, United States
I’d like to stay away from any buffers and focus on an approach that offers consistency. I feel like buffers really risk throwing params out of whack esp if left unchecked.

Buffers are never the best solution to a pH problem. Higher pH alkalinity supplements can be part of the answer.
 

ReefBeta

Valuable Member
View Badges
Joined
May 26, 2016
Messages
1,020
Reaction score
887
Location
Seattle, US
Looks like your two low pH sources are too much for the skimmer to effectively degas. If you have a spare skimmer, or one in a separate system, I would try borrow it over for a couple days to see if it make a difference. If so, it's time to consider upgrading the skimmer or permanently add a second one.

Another thing can help is dosing kalk. For one, it raise pH by itself. For the second, it supplement the calcium reactor so that less low pH effluent is needed to add to the tank.
 
Budmans

ReefBeta

Valuable Member
View Badges
Joined
May 26, 2016
Messages
1,020
Reaction score
887
Location
Seattle, US
Another thing I noticed is the day night difference in your tank is quite big, as 0.5. Mine is only 0.2. It could because the heavy bioload, both fish and corals, produce plenty of CO2 at night, and plenty of photosynthesis during the day. So another thing might help is only run the calcium reactor during the day when lights are on. Or higher flow during the day, lower flow during the night if it's doable. That way you minimize the CO2 input into the tank at night. Maybe it can change pH from 7.5~8.0 to 7.6~7.9. That would be a welcoming improvement.

Also, find a way to drip the effluent into skimmer will also help gas out CO2 more efficiently. ReefDudes mentioned in his livestream that it help raise the pH by 0.1.
 

Montiman

Well-Known Member
View Badges
Joined
Sep 20, 2017
Messages
975
Reaction score
1,046
Location
Pheonix
Another consideration. I see you have a life reef skimmer. I love these skimmers but keep in mind that the air is recirculated. I would remove the air line from the cup and see what happens. it may help to add more room air to the skimmer.
 
https://www.triton.de/en/

Are you currently housing your most favorite fish ever?

  • Yes (please tell us what in the thread)

    Votes: 121 34.1%
  • No

    Votes: 226 63.7%
  • Other (please explain)

    Votes: 8 2.3%

Online statistics

Members online
762
Guests online
3,705
Total visitors
4,467
Kessil
Top