tube worm name? Thanks!

FurrierTransform

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Gentlepeoples of Reef2Reef, I have these tube worms and never paid any attention to them for years and years. The tubes are brown colored, very small (about 4 mm long), with fronds or tentacles that are brown in white light. I recently switched over to predominantly blue LED, and found the tentacles fluoresce green. Well now I'm curious about them, what is its name? Reproduction? Feeding needs (obviously since I've never specifically fed them, they must get bits from the water)? I guess they must be photosynthetic as well, given that they fluoresce? In this light (white + blue LED), the fronds show the green tint. They came on some live rock.

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For help with the ID, do you think you could get a clear, close-up, top-down, white-light shot of one specimen's mouth with the tentacles extended, and another clear, close-up, white-light shot of one of the specimen's tubes?

Also, just a note here, the fluorescence doesn't necessarily indicate photosynthesis (in fact, there are a number of different marine animals - including fish - that are fluorescent without being photosynthetic or having a symbiotic relationship with a photosynthetic organism).
 
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For help with the ID, do you think you could get a clear, close-up, top-down, white-light shot of one specimen's mouth with the tentacles extended, and another clear, close-up, white-light shot of one of the specimen's tubes?
Blue light turned off, just a white light. Can't zoom anymore. The circle shows 3 or 4 of these things. As I said, they're awfully tiny.
 

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I believe those are colonial hydroids...
+1 - for these guys, looking at your photo there, the tubes appear to be translucent, which would indicate to me that these are either some kind of jellyfish or hydroid (as tube worms build their tubes using sediment from their surroundings). Some people believe these (or similar specimens) to be polyp stage Nausithoe spp. (jellyfish), but others have reported them surviving for years in their tanks. Given that most jellyfish only live for up to three years, the odds of these being a jellyfish seem slim to me, so I'm inclined to believe they are colonial hydroids. If you see them (as one person I've read has claimed) turning into the medusa (free-swimming adult) stage and reproducing, then by all means let me know - that would be quite interesting. Otherwise, I'd say they're colonial hydroids of some kind.
maybe! Now I have a starting point for more reading. Their tubes are rigid, not fleshy as I thought hydroids are.
Not all hydroids have fleshy tubes (Errina novaezelandiae, for example), and not all tube worms have rigid tubes (Sabellastarte spectabilis, for example).
 
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Some people believe these (or similar specimens) to be polyp stage Nausithoe spp. (jellyfish), but others have reported them surviving for years in their tanks. Given that most jellyfish only live for up to three years, the odds of these being a jellyfish seem slim to me, so I'm inclined to believe they are colonial hydroids. If you see them (as one person I've read has claimed) turning into the medusa (free-swimming adult) stage and reproducing, then by all means let me know - that would be quite interesting. Otherwise, I'd say they're colonial hydroids of some kind.
A long time ago, I would periodically see several, small jellyfish, pulsating about the tank, perhaps 3 mm diameter. This may have been when I had metal halide bulbs (then several years of compact fluorescent, now recently changed to blue LED). But I never made the connection that the jelly fish might be related to these things. We'll see if the lighting spectrum change does anything ...
 

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