Air compressor to raise ph

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DanTheReefer

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Wondering if anybody has used an air compressor to feed the skimmer and raise the ph.
Our best ph options are typically kalk (I’m already doing this), co2 scrubber (expensive media), open windows (can’t in FL), draw air from outside into skimmer (tricky in my reef’s interior wall location in the house). Wondering if instead of drawing air from outside, we can put an air compressor in line with the skimmer and periodically take it outside to fill it. Thoughts?

E782ADF8-0968-43FD-9E3E-E6DC4755D1A3.jpeg
 

Garf

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Wondering if anybody has used an air compressor to feed the skimmer and raise the ph.
Our best ph options are typically kalk (I’m already doing this), co2 scrubber (expensive media), open windows (can’t in FL), draw air from outside into skimmer (tricky in my reef’s interior wall location in the house). Wondering if instead of drawing air from outside, we can put an air compressor in line with the skimmer and periodically take it outside to fill it. Thoughts?

E782ADF8-0968-43FD-9E3E-E6DC4755D1A3.jpeg
If you force air into a skimmer it will produce huge bubbles and reduce the effectiveness. In fact I find reducing airflow sometimes works better.
 
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DanTheReefer

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The point is to remove CO2, not add O2

Although it would be kind of cool to say your reef was supercharged
The air interacting with the tank at the skimmer would have a lower percentage of co2 than the air in the home, that’s why drawing outside air or opening windows is effective
 

Joe31415

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That's an interesting idea. I actually have my air compressor outside but I have a line plumbed into my basement. I could easily tap into that and run it up to the tank. However, I think it would make more sense to put the air compressor line *near* the skimmer air intake, not directly into it. That way air isn't being forced in, but the skimmer has access to the fresh air.

Another option might me to just submerge the line from the compressor (maybe stick an airstone one it) in the sump. You won't get as much gas exchange, but I don't think it would hurt.
 

kenbennedy

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You can use a regulator to limit the pressure between the air compressor tank and the skimmer intake.

I would also be concerned about whether the compressor lubricants are introduced into the compressed air and then the reef tank. This is usually a concern with breathable gasses, and could possibly require an online filter.
 
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DanTheReefer

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You can use a regulator to limit the pressure between the air compressor tank and the skimmer intake.

I would also be concerned about whether the compressor lubricants are introduced into the compressed air and then the reef tank. This is usually a concern with breathable gasses, and could possibly require an online filter.
That is one of my main concerns. The other one is how long the air would last for a tank that is practically sized
 
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DanTheReefer

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That's an interesting idea. I actually have my air compressor outside but I have a line plumbed into my basement. I could easily tap into that and run it up to the tank. However, I think it would make more sense to put the air compressor line *near* the skimmer air intake, not directly into it. That way air isn't being forced in, but the skimmer has access to the fresh air.

Another option might me to just submerge the line from the compressor (maybe stick an airstone one it) in the sump. You won't get as much gas exchange, but I don't think it would hurt.
Oh nice so you have pressurized air running to your basement? Not bad. Yeah I think figuring out how to get the air in the skimmer without pressurizing it is important. I don’t know maybe I’ll just spend the $50 at harbor freight and see how it goes
 

Joe31415

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Oh nice so you have pressurized air running to your basement? Not bad. Yeah I think figuring out how to get the air in the skimmer without pressurizing it is important. I don’t know maybe I’ll just spend the $50 at harbor freight and see how it goes
Yup. I have a kit like this.
As for lubricants getting into the line, I have no idea. You can get a filter/drier, which I suspect would get some of it out. I also have about 30 feet of copper pipe that zig zags back and forth on the wall behind the compressor. Air leaving the compressor goes through that first. It gives any moisture in the line that much more time to condense out. Not a big deal for an aquarium (but necessary for a plasma cutter) but that could give oil a chance to get out as well. Plus all the tubing running through my (cold) basement.
 

innovusaquaculture

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I run lines to all my skimmers from outside air compressors. i have a total of 4 compressors that run in tandem and pressurize 1000 gallons of air tanks to 200 psi outside. I run oil free compressors.
inside the air first runs through an air dryer, UV filters, micron filters, then carbon filters, then co2 scrubbers. Then runs through a two regulators. The first reduces the pressure to 30 psi and I have a "clean air" storage tank at that pressure. Then I adjust each skimmer with a regulator to get the exact air exchange I want for the tank.

I also use the same air for my phyto plankton and pod stations and the QT tanks.
 
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Spieg

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I would also be concerned about whether the compressor lubricants are introduced into the compressed air and then the reef tank. This is usually a concern with breathable gasses, and could possibly require an online filter.
This is a valid concern. Exactly why specialized air compressors are required to fill scuba tanks.
 

Potatohead

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The air interacting with the tank at the skimmer would have a lower percentage of co2 than the air in the home, that’s why drawing outside air or opening windows is effective

Ok, so basically you just want a tank of outside air to store inside. It would work but most skimmers pull a decent amount of air and it would likely deplete the tank pretty quickly, even if it starts at 100 psi. If there was a way to feed the compressor outside air it would work better, but then at that point you might as well just run a line to skimmer.
 

DeniableArc

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I run lines to all my skimmers from outside air compressors. i have a total of 4 compressors that run in tandem and pressurize 1000 gallons of air tanks to 200 psi outside. I run oil free compressors.
inside the air first runs through an air dryer, UV filters, micron filters, then carbon filters, then co2 scrubbers. Then runs through a two regulators. The first reduces the pressure to 30 psi and I have a "clean air" storage tank at that pressure. Then I adjust each skimmer with a regulator to get the exact air exchange I want for the tank.

I also use the same air for my phyto plankton and pod stations and the QT tanks.
Can we see some photos of your entire setup, seems really interesting!
 
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