Beginner sucess rates?

AC1211

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So as the title says what is a good sucess rate for beginners?
When i was keeping freshwater my early sucess rate was roughly 50-50 until now where I have it up to almost 90% soon to hit 90%.
In saltwater I am unsure as outside the 2 clowns I eill not declare anything a sucess through 1 year. Nothing else has shown growth. If everything were to die tomorrow which it won't I would put my sucess rate at 11% or so because everything else that I have has not grown enough or done well enough to be declared a sucess although I have only lost one invert (cleaner shrimp). So what should I expect am I doing average above average, below average... my 4 lps frags and my rock flower nem are alive but no growth for 6 months with them is that concerning?
 

Quietman

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At 7 months, I have some corals that a growing very nicely, others that are just holding steady, some are struggling and some have died off (about 10%). Seems to be a nice bell curve. 10% success, 40% adequate and struggling, 10% failure. I have noticed over time the curve shifting to the left which is what I expect. I haven't invested in expensive or high demand corals yet as like you, I think maturity from dry start takes a year based on what I've seen here and elsewhere. At the year point I would like to see 25% success, 50% adequate, 20% stuggling and 5% failure or better.
 

W1ngz

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I don't think I'd call anything a failure unless it either dies, or you quit. A reef tank is hard, and the learning curve is practically a cliff face when you're first starting out.

If literally half of what I put in my tank died in the first year, I don't think I'd have stuck around. I'd say about 75% survival in year 1 of a newbie is pretty good. Thriving is a whole other story, and I don't think it's reasonable to expect everyone to have a thriving tank in year 1.
 

S2G

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You mean survival rate? Its hard to throw a % at it. You shouldn't be losing many animals. I'd say a good success rate is 90% or better as a beginner. If your losing more than that you're probably rushing things or buying poor quality animals .

Success would be the ability to maintain stable parameters long term and make small adjustments as required. If your corals & nem aren't thriving figure out why then fix it.

As a whole there's probably only 25% success in sw & probably 10% fw. The price of sw usually weeds out the fish bowl people.
 
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lilgrounchuck

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What equipment are you running? What are your parameters? Lighting schedule? Too little or too much of this or that can make all the difference. I started out with a Current Orbit light for about 5 months and everything stayed alive, but very little growth. I switched to a mars 300w and I had 4x as much growth in 2 months than I did the previous 5.
 

Sierra_Bravo

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I think it's about planning and proper investment. I never had a tank before, but I spent the time to research and plan, bought the correct equipment from the beginning, didn't rush and developed an in-wall 120 gallon SPS tank that has been very successful and that I'm proud of. I avoided many of the pitfalls that an over-eager beginner may face.

For what it's worth, it was the nine-month mark before pretty much any coral I put in I knew would do well without question. Spending money on quality livestock is as important as equipment. . . that $9.99 eBay acro is less likely to thrive than a healthy frag from Battlecorals or your local acro guru.

Best of luck!
 

good.reef

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Here is my tank at 9 months. 1st saltwater tank ever. Lost 0 fish and 1 chalice frag and 1 duncan frag so I'd say it's a 99% success rate. The orange hammer and gold torch have been in there since month 2. Good growth on all of my corals. I don't dose anything and haven't done a test in over 6 months. PWC every 10 days or so. I really think that people chasing and adjusting numbers causes bigger problems than just letting the tank do it's thing...
80224921_10206595736127498_5709156892492693504_o.jpg
 

krash7172

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Coming from fresh water myself, it took about 18 mo to get my first reef in order. About another year to be proud of it. If I did it again, I could probably do it in half the time. To answer the original question, I had much failure in the first 18 months but it improved rapidly.
 

Tahoe61

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Here is my tank at 9 months. 1st saltwater tank ever. Lost 0 fish and 1 chalice frag and 1 duncan frag so I'd say it's a 99% success rate. The orange hammer and gold torch have been in there since month 2. Good growth on all of my corals. I don't dose anything and haven't done a test in over 6 months. PWC every 10 days or so. I really think that people chasing and adjusting numbers causes bigger problems than just letting the tank do it's thing...
80224921_10206595736127498_5709156892492693504_o.jpg
Stunning tank at 9 months for a first time reefer. You have talent.

And I wholeheartedly agree, some make this a lot harder than it needs to be. More observation less testing.
 

Kfactor

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I just got back in to the hobby after 6 years and the one thing I find is how you start the tank . I had my tank running with no lights on and no fish for the first 3 months . Then I added 1 fish a month and turn the lights on after around 4 months. After the tank has been running for almost a year now and found my corals seem to be doing really good now I think everything stabilized and has been pretty good
 

Victor_C3

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Maybe I’m just a natural, but I’d say my success rate from day one has easily been 90%+.

In two systems I’ve previously set up, the only major livestock I ever lost was a cleaner shrimp and a Copper Band Butterfly. I can’t recall ever losing another fish.

Excluding an incident where a friend watched my tank for two weeks while I was on vacation, the lights failed to turn on for 10 days, and he didn’t realize it was an issue and I lost all of my corals, I’ve never lost a coral.

My first system was a mixed reef and my second was an SPS dominated. The only reason I tore down previous systems was when I moved.

I just move slowly and stock reasonable fish in an appropriately sized aquarium. Honestly, I don’t find the hobby to be that hard, you just need to stay on top of your maintenance and do your research. It’s all about diligence and attention to detail.
 

Complaining about the cost of aquarium equipment when you pay large sums of money for coral & fish..

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