Can my floor hold my aquarium?

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BillyP

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I recently bought a 125 gallon aquarium and want to know if my floor can support it. The ceiling below the aquarium runs 2x12 16 feet long at 16 inches apart parallel to the aquarium. The total weight of the aquarium is about 250lbs per square foot. I'm trying to get a hold of a structural engineer right now. Thanks!
 
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I recently bought a 125 gallon aquarium and want to know if my floor can support it. The ceiling below the aquarium runs 2x12 16 feet long at 16 inches apart parallel to the aquarium. The total weight of the aquarium is about 250lbs per square foot. I'm trying to get a hold of a structural engineer right now. Thanks!

I would say if it cannot you may want to rebuild your house. 125 isn’t a terribly large aquarium. But I am not a structural engineer so take that with a grain of salt. If it were me I’d just set it up. Now if you where going much larger like 400 gallon I may be slightly concerned. Also consider supporting walls. It will definitely offset stress points.
 

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Hello,

If you put this tank on a wall bearing support wall then yes. However, your tank may only weigh 225 but when it’s loaded with 125 pounds of rock, 125 pounds of sand, plus your stand, plus water which is 8.5 pounds times 125 is 1,062.5 + 225 for tank, maybe 120 pounds stand, 125 pounds of rock, and 125 pounds of sand that’s about 1,675 pounds actually.

If this is in the middle of your floor or not on a wall bearing support wall, I would reinforce your floor. If the tank is not level, it could possibly break a seal and leak.
 
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Parallel or perpendicular to floor joists? Above a load bearing wall or out in no means land? The post above that says just do it, is not very good advice. Your tank will probably not come crashing through the floor. But it may sag over time leading to disaster.
 
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BillyP

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Parallel or perpendicular to floor joists? Above a load bearing wall or out in no means land? The post above that says just do it, is not very good advice. Your tank will probably not come crashing through the floor. But it may sag over time leading to disaster.

Parallel sadly and not above a load bearing wall.
 

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Parallel sadly and not above a load bearing wall.

Is the basement finished? @Sarah24! is correct on weight. Pushing 2000 lbs in one location is still a lot of weight.

If you can't place it near a foundation wall or across joists, reinforcing the joists by "sistering" the joists and even supporting the floor with Jack's (steel posts) would be advisable. Why? Floor bounce when people walk in the room. Less deflection, less stress on seams long term.
 
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BillyP

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Is the basement finished? @Sarah24! is correct on weight. Pushing 2000 lbs in one location is still a lot of weight.

If you can't place it near a foundation wall or across joists, reinforcing the joists by "sistering" the joists and even supporting the floor with Jack's (steel posts) would be advisable. Why? Floor bounce when people walk in the room. Less deflection, less stress on seams long term.

I can try to place it above a load bearing wall but I'm not sure if it's actually load bearing. I can send a picture later if you can look at it.
 
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BillyP

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Is the basement finished? @Sarah24! is correct on weight. Pushing 2000 lbs in one location is still a lot of weight.

If you can't place it near a foundation wall or across joists, reinforcing the joists by "sistering" the joists and even supporting the floor with Jack's (steel posts) would be advisable. Why? Floor bounce when people walk in the room. Less deflection, less stress on seams long term.

Basements finished, pantry, aka where the aquarium is above, is not finished
 

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I can try to place it above a load bearing wall but I'm not sure if it's actually load bearing. I can send a picture later if you can look at it.

Okay. I reinforced my floor for my 125. My tank sets on a wall with a concrete foundation wall underneath. I even "sistered" my joists underneath and placed Jack's under the tank.

I have a large span in my living room and when people walk in there, the floor would "bounce" a little. Supporting the floor made the tank stable. Check out my build thread in my signature for ideas.
 
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BillyP

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Okay. I reinforced my floor for my 125. My tank sets on a wall with a concrete foundation wall underneath. I even "sistered" my joists underneath and placed Jack's under the tank.

I have a large span in my living room and when people walk in there, the floor would "bounce" a little. Supporting the floor made the tank stable. Check out my build thread in my signature for ideas.

Ok thanks.
 
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apparently my aquarium is above a kid bearing wall, the bathroom. With these pictures does it look fine? It has the small wood supports under the ceiling joists I don't know if that helps.
 

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I recently bought a 125 gallon aquarium and want to know if my floor can support it. The ceiling below the aquarium runs 2x12 16 feet long at 16 inches apart parallel to the aquarium. The total weight of the aquarium is about 250lbs per square foot. I'm trying to get a hold of a structural engineer right now. Thanks!
I'm sorry to say you might have to reinforce the floor. Majority of the house are designed for 60LB/sq.f.t.
 
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Will it hold the tank, yes. Will it sag over time, possibly.

Can you spend about $100 on either 4x4 post, or some jack stands for some peace of mind?

I would just put the supports in, it will stop that nagging in the back of your mind about it. Even if you don't need it, it will put you at ease and allow you to enjoy the tank more.
 
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BillyP

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Will it hold the tank, yes. Will it sag over time, possibly.

Can you spend about $100 on either 4x4 post, or some jack stands for some peace of mind?

I would just put the supports in, it will stop that nagging in the back of your mind about it. Even if you don't need it, it will put you at ease and allow you to enjoy the tank more.

So should I place inbetween these?
831710ca22a18cdfcf93009634b99073.jpg
 
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I would not install a tank in your situation without reinforcements. 2x12 at 16' is already pushing it, plus being parallel to the tank. One of my buddies had the same scenario, and his floor sank almost 3/4 inch in one year. We had to empty the tank and reinforce with extra joists and a jack post.
 
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BillyP

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I would not install a tank in your situation without reinforcements. 2x12 at 16' is already pushing it, plus being parallel to the tank. One of my buddies had the same scenario, and his floor sank almost 3/4 inch in one year. We had to empty the tank and reinforce with extra joists and a jack post.

So where should I put the jacks???
 
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