Could I have saved my anemone?

shootingstar_reef

Active Member
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
View Badges
Joined
Dec 27, 2020
Messages
143
Reaction score
166
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
Location
Los Angeles (SFV)
Hey everyone, my nem (rose bubble tip) went to the ocean in the sky and I wanted some thoughts on what I could have done different -

My NO3 and PO4 regularly hover just above undetectable (ie 0) (Tropic marin compact lab and Hanna, respectively). My 45g tank was setup October 2020, I have a refugium and macros in my display. Fish: wrasse, two clowns, hawkfish. Inverts: two red hermit crabs, two blue hermit crabs, snails, conch.

The ~2 inch anemone was added earlier this year (Feb/March maybe). I don't have a PAR meter, but I have a monti growing okay towards the middle-top of my tank. My feeding regimen is once per day, either frozen or dry with one tiny scoop of rotifers and one tiny scoop of reef chili. Occasionally live white worms. I add cheatogro, dose All-for-reef, AB+, and phytoplankton.

Here is its history as I can remember: The anemone seemed to behave typically when I got it. It wandered for a day then found it's spot and stayed there. It was generally fine, but generally wasn't too happy about being fed. It would take food (small amounts, think 3-4 mysis srhimp) but then shrink for half a day or so and then bounce back. I eventually stopped directly feeding it. However, the anemone started getting unhappy every time I fed the tank - it would shrink, and sometimes gape. At one point, I increased my flow to appease some corals - the nem moved to a new spot but still seemed content. I went on vacation for a week about a month ago and had my family take care of my tank - when I came back, it was a little unkempt; some overgrown algae, corals that seemed irritated but not worse for wear. After some cleaning everything bounced back. The anemone still seemed fine (as far as I could tell). One day, less than two weeks ago, I wanted to see if my nem would take food because it wasn't growing. I gave it a couple pieces of mysis shrimp (and I do mean it was pretty much two pieces), and it just pretty much never recovered: it shrunk, it went into the dark, then it slowly made its way up the rockwork and then shriveled up. I found on the sand bed and thought I'd try and put it in a little holder towards the top of my tank, but by the next day it was a cloud of dissolved anemone flesh.

Did I overfeed it? Was it too small for me to be successful? Was this just chance? Thanks for ur time
 
Printed Reef - Custom Reef Accessories

blaxsun

10K Club member
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
View Badges
Joined
Dec 15, 2020
Messages
14,250
Reaction score
15,856
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
Location
The Abyss
I have mixed success with anemones. I've got a bubbletip and condy doing really good right now, but another 3 just up and withered away. Parameters, lighting and flow were all great - so I think my tank conditions are just to different than the environment that many of these anemones originated in.
 

vetteguy53081

Well known Member and monster tank lover
Review score
+4 /0 /-0
View Badges
Joined
Aug 11, 2013
Messages
62,280
Reaction score
135,800
Review score
+4 /0 /-0
Location
Wisconsin - Florida before Fall
Hey everyone, my nem (rose bubble tip) went to the ocean in the sky and I wanted some thoughts on what I could have done different -

My NO3 and PO4 regularly hover just above undetectable (ie 0) (Tropic marin compact lab and Hanna, respectively). My 45g tank was setup October 2020, I have a refugium and macros in my display. Fish: wrasse, two clowns, hawkfish. Inverts: two red hermit crabs, two blue hermit crabs, snails, conch.

The ~2 inch anemone was added earlier this year (Feb/March maybe). I don't have a PAR meter, but I have a monti growing okay towards the middle-top of my tank. My feeding regimen is once per day, either frozen or dry with one tiny scoop of rotifers and one tiny scoop of reef chili. Occasionally live white worms. I add cheatogro, dose All-for-reef, AB+, and phytoplankton.

Here is its history as I can remember: The anemone seemed to behave typically when I got it. It wandered for a day then found it's spot and stayed there. It was generally fine, but generally wasn't too happy about being fed. It would take food (small amounts, think 3-4 mysis srhimp) but then shrink for half a day or so and then bounce back. I eventually stopped directly feeding it. However, the anemone started getting unhappy every time I fed the tank - it would shrink, and sometimes gape. At one point, I increased my flow to appease some corals - the nem moved to a new spot but still seemed content. I went on vacation for a week about a month ago and had my family take care of my tank - when I came back, it was a little unkempt; some overgrown algae, corals that seemed irritated but not worse for wear. After some cleaning everything bounced back. The anemone still seemed fine (as far as I could tell). One day, less than two weeks ago, I wanted to see if my nem would take food because it wasn't growing. I gave it a couple pieces of mysis shrimp (and I do mean it was pretty much two pieces), and it just pretty much never recovered: it shrunk, it went into the dark, then it slowly made its way up the rockwork and then shriveled up. I found on the sand bed and thought I'd try and put it in a little holder towards the top of my tank, but by the next day it was a cloud of dissolved anemone flesh.

Did I overfeed it? Was it too small for me to be successful? Was this just chance? Thanks for ur time
Was the food thawed or still cold ?
Bubble Tip Anemones prefer warmer temperatures. Water should be on the alkali side as well. Monitor water conditions regularly to avoid any major changes. Ammonia and nitrate levels should be undetectable at all times using a good quality test kit and Not API either.
Here are some water parameters to follow.
  • Water temperature: 77°F - 80°F (stay close to the middle of this range)
  • pH level: 8.1 to 8.3
  • Alk: 8 to 11 dKH
  • Salinity: 1.024 to 1.025
  • Nitrate < .5
  • Phosphate < .04 - .06
When you first introduce the anemone to the tank, turn down any pumps. The flow should be minimal until the anemone gets settled in. Chances are, your new Bubble Tip Anemone will move around the tank until it finds a suitable spot to call home.
If it starts to move towards any coral, simply direct your water jets to the coral. This will discourage the anemone from anchoring near it. It will move to another area to attach.
Bubble Tip Anemone lighting is a very important aspect of their care. These creatures need a lot of light to thrive because they’re photosynthetic which means that they absorb light to produce food and growth. The anemone has zooxanthellae in its body, which are symbiotic microorganisms that they feed on. Without proper lighting, the anemone will expel the zooxanthellae and turn white. This process is called bleaching and often leads to death.
A moderate amount of flow is recommended. Many aquarists soon find out that too much flow will cause the anemone to stretch out and look stringy. Keeping things moderate will help avoid this from happening. Avoid directing your flow directly at the anemone. These anemones enjoy subtle movement at all times but too much direct flow hitting the anemone will force it to move.
Lastly- Feeding.
Bubble Tip Anemones feeding is one of the easiest parts of their care. These animals get food from a lot of different sources. As mentioned earlier, they are photosynthetic and use light to create food. They will also eat food off of the fish they host. These anemones enjoy small morsels of shrimp and squid. They will also accept many frozen foods. To feed the anemone, attach the food to a stick or large tweezers. Then, touch the anemone with it. The creature will use its tentacles to grab onto the food and consume it. Feedings twice a week is sufficient.
 
OP
shootingstar_reef

shootingstar_reef

Active Member
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
View Badges
Joined
Dec 27, 2020
Messages
143
Reaction score
166
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
Location
Los Angeles (SFV)
Was the food thawed or still cold ?
Bubble Tip Anemones prefer warmer temperatures. Water should be on the alkali side as well. Monitor water conditions regularly to avoid any major changes. Ammonia and nitrate levels should be undetectable at all times using a good quality test kit and Not API either.
Here are some water parameters to follow.
  • Water temperature: 77°F - 80°F (stay close to the middle of this range)
  • pH level: 8.1 to 8.3
  • Alk: 8 to 11 dKH
  • Salinity: 1.024 to 1.025
  • Nitrate < .5
  • Phosphate < .04 - .06
When you first introduce the anemone to the tank, turn down any pumps. The flow should be minimal until the anemone gets settled in. Chances are, your new Bubble Tip Anemone will move around the tank until it finds a suitable spot to call home.
If it starts to move towards any coral, simply direct your water jets to the coral. This will discourage the anemone from anchoring near it. It will move to another area to attach.
Bubble Tip Anemone lighting is a very important aspect of their care. These creatures need a lot of light to thrive because they’re photosynthetic which means that they absorb light to produce food and growth. The anemone has zooxanthellae in its body, which are symbiotic microorganisms that they feed on. Without proper lighting, the anemone will expel the zooxanthellae and turn white. This process is called bleaching and often leads to death.
A moderate amount of flow is recommended. Many aquarists soon find out that too much flow will cause the anemone to stretch out and look stringy. Keeping things moderate will help avoid this from happening. Avoid directing your flow directly at the anemone. These anemones enjoy subtle movement at all times but too much direct flow hitting the anemone will force it to move.
Lastly- Feeding.
Bubble Tip Anemones feeding is one of the easiest parts of their care. These animals get food from a lot of different sources. As mentioned earlier, they are photosynthetic and use light to create food. They will also eat food off of the fish they host. These anemones enjoy small morsels of shrimp and squid. They will also accept many frozen foods. To feed the anemone, attach the food to a stick or large tweezers. Then, touch the anemone with it. The creature will use its tentacles to grab onto the food and consume it. Feedings twice a week is sufficient.
Thanks so much for the info -
  • It was definitely fully thawed
  • My tank runs within all the ranges you specified
  • I pretty much had done all the rest, with the exception of feeding it. It did not seem to like that.
 

Duncan62

Valuable Member
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
View Badges
Joined
Oct 4, 2021
Messages
1,301
Reaction score
1,094
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
Location
Kannapolis
Hey everyone, my nem (rose bubble tip) went to the ocean in the sky and I wanted some thoughts on what I could have done different -

My NO3 and PO4 regularly hover just above undetectable (ie 0) (Tropic marin compact lab and Hanna, respectively). My 45g tank was setup October 2020, I have a refugium and macros in my display. Fish: wrasse, two clowns, hawkfish. Inverts: two red hermit crabs, two blue hermit crabs, snails, conch.

The ~2 inch anemone was added earlier this year (Feb/March maybe). I don't have a PAR meter, but I have a monti growing okay towards the middle-top of my tank. My feeding regimen is once per day, either frozen or dry with one tiny scoop of rotifers and one tiny scoop of reef chili. Occasionally live white worms. I add cheatogro, dose All-for-reef, AB+, and phytoplankton.

Here is its history as I can remember: The anemone seemed to behave typically when I got it. It wandered for a day then found it's spot and stayed there. It was generally fine, but generally wasn't too happy about being fed. It would take food (small amounts, think 3-4 mysis srhimp) but then shrink for half a day or so and then bounce back. I eventually stopped directly feeding it. However, the anemone started getting unhappy every time I fed the tank - it would shrink, and sometimes gape. At one point, I increased my flow to appease some corals - the nem moved to a new spot but still seemed content. I went on vacation for a week about a month ago and had my family take care of my tank - when I came back, it was a little unkempt; some overgrown algae, corals that seemed irritated but not worse for wear. After some cleaning everything bounced back. The anemone still seemed fine (as far as I could tell). One day, less than two weeks ago, I wanted to see if my nem would take food because it wasn't growing. I gave it a couple pieces of mysis shrimp (and I do mean it was pretty much two pieces), and it just pretty much never recovered: it shrunk, it went into the dark, then it slowly made its way up the rockwork and then shriveled up. I found on the sand bed and thought I'd try and put it in a little holder towards the top of my tank, but by the next day it was a cloud of dissolved anemone flesh.

Did I overfeed it? Was it too small for me to be successful? Was this just chance? Thanks for ur time
You over fed it.
 
Coral Mania

vetteguy53081

Well known Member and monster tank lover
Review score
+4 /0 /-0
View Badges
Joined
Aug 11, 2013
Messages
62,280
Reaction score
135,800
Review score
+4 /0 /-0
Location
Wisconsin - Florida before Fall
Hm what do you think it was? The powder, AB+? At what point would you have changed the regimen, and what would you have cut back on (e.g. cut back on powder or eliminate it entirely)?
neither of these are good foods for nem and I say Powder which is planktonic based and not favorable nem food
 
OP
shootingstar_reef

shootingstar_reef

Active Member
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
View Badges
Joined
Dec 27, 2020
Messages
143
Reaction score
166
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
Location
Los Angeles (SFV)
neither of these are good foods for nem and I say Powder which is planktonic based and not favorable nem food
I see, thanks so much for that insight!

To make sure I'm understanding correctly, are you saying that if I place an anemone in a mixed reef tank, I should reduce/eliminate powders and supplemental dosing for corals because it will irritate the nem, or are you saying that these supplements don't count as feeding a nem as they are indifferent to them?
 

Erin1971Texas

Just another girl who likes fish
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
View Badges
Joined
May 14, 2019
Messages
2,327
Reaction score
2,480
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
Location
Spring, Texas
Was the food thawed or still cold ?
Bubble Tip Anemones prefer warmer temperatures. Water should be on the alkali side as well. Monitor water conditions regularly to avoid any major changes. Ammonia and nitrate levels should be undetectable at all times using a good quality test kit and Not API either.
Here are some water parameters to follow.
  • Water temperature: 77°F - 80°F (stay close to the middle of this range)
  • pH level: 8.1 to 8.3
  • Alk: 8 to 11 dKH
  • Salinity: 1.024 to 1.025
  • Nitrate < .5
  • Phosphate < .04 - .06
When you first introduce the anemone to the tank, turn down any pumps. The flow should be minimal until the anemone gets settled in. Chances are, your new Bubble Tip Anemone will move around the tank until it finds a suitable spot to call home.
If it starts to move towards any coral, simply direct your water jets to the coral. This will discourage the anemone from anchoring near it. It will move to another area to attach.
Bubble Tip Anemone lighting is a very important aspect of their care. These creatures need a lot of light to thrive because they’re photosynthetic which means that they absorb light to produce food and growth. The anemone has zooxanthellae in its body, which are symbiotic microorganisms that they feed on. Without proper lighting, the anemone will expel the zooxanthellae and turn white. This process is called bleaching and often leads to death.
A moderate amount of flow is recommended. Many aquarists soon find out that too much flow will cause the anemone to stretch out and look stringy. Keeping things moderate will help avoid this from happening. Avoid directing your flow directly at the anemone. These anemones enjoy subtle movement at all times but too much direct flow hitting the anemone will force it to move.
Lastly- Feeding.
Bubble Tip Anemones feeding is one of the easiest parts of their care. These animals get food from a lot of different sources. As mentioned earlier, they are photosynthetic and use light to create food. They will also eat food off of the fish they host. These anemones enjoy small morsels of shrimp and squid. They will also accept many frozen foods. To feed the anemone, attach the food to a stick or large tweezers. Then, touch the anemone with it. The creature will use its tentacles to grab onto the food and consume it. Feedings twice a week is sufficient.
For those interested, here is the link to the article VG plagiarized... unless his real name is Alison Yang


Edit: he did add the part about nitrates needing to be below 0.5ppm... which is ridiculous!
 
Avast

Erin1971Texas

Just another girl who likes fish
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
View Badges
Joined
May 14, 2019
Messages
2,327
Reaction score
2,480
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
Location
Spring, Texas
Hey everyone, my nem (rose bubble tip) went to the ocean in the sky and I wanted some thoughts on what I could have done different -

My NO3 and PO4 regularly hover just above undetectable (ie 0) (Tropic marin compact lab and Hanna, respectively). My 45g tank was setup October 2020, I have a refugium and macros in my display. Fish: wrasse, two clowns, hawkfish. Inverts: two red hermit crabs, two blue hermit crabs, snails, conch.

The ~2 inch anemone was added earlier this year (Feb/March maybe). I don't have a PAR meter, but I have a monti growing okay towards the middle-top of my tank. My feeding regimen is once per day, either frozen or dry with one tiny scoop of rotifers and one tiny scoop of reef chili. Occasionally live white worms. I add cheatogro, dose All-for-reef, AB+, and phytoplankton.

Here is its history as I can remember: The anemone seemed to behave typically when I got it. It wandered for a day then found it's spot and stayed there. It was generally fine, but generally wasn't too happy about being fed. It would take food (small amounts, think 3-4 mysis srhimp) but then shrink for half a day or so and then bounce back. I eventually stopped directly feeding it. However, the anemone started getting unhappy every time I fed the tank - it would shrink, and sometimes gape. At one point, I increased my flow to appease some corals - the nem moved to a new spot but still seemed content. I went on vacation for a week about a month ago and had my family take care of my tank - when I came back, it was a little unkempt; some overgrown algae, corals that seemed irritated but not worse for wear. After some cleaning everything bounced back. The anemone still seemed fine (as far as I could tell). One day, less than two weeks ago, I wanted to see if my nem would take food because it wasn't growing. I gave it a couple pieces of mysis shrimp (and I do mean it was pretty much two pieces), and it just pretty much never recovered: it shrunk, it went into the dark, then it slowly made its way up the rockwork and then shriveled up. I found on the sand bed and thought I'd try and put it in a little holder towards the top of my tank, but by the next day it was a cloud of dissolved anemone flesh.

Did I overfeed it? Was it too small for me to be successful? Was this just chance? Thanks for ur time
Where did you get the nem from? Usually buying from another hobbyist will give you a better chance of success... An anemone that's been in a tank for a while and has split is probably more likely to adjust to another tank than one that may have been harvested from the ocean.
 

Tamberav

5000 Club Member
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
View Badges
Joined
Jul 4, 2014
Messages
7,040
Reaction score
10,445
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
Location
Wauwatosa, WI
That nem sounds pretty small. Sometimes the little ones can be finiky.

Wild nems can also be a gamble.

I don’t feed mine at all though sometime I will see my clownfish feed it.
 
OP
shootingstar_reef

shootingstar_reef

Active Member
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
View Badges
Joined
Dec 27, 2020
Messages
143
Reaction score
166
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
Location
Los Angeles (SFV)
Where did you get the nem from? Usually buying from another hobbyist will give you a better chance of success... An anemone that's been in a tank for a while and has split is probably more likely to adjust to another tank than one that may have been harvested from the ocean.
It was a split from an anemone at an LFS. They have a few that regularly split in a tank in their shop and they sell the babies

I have seen only a couple messages floating around that smaller nems are a little more finicky, and wondering if that contributed to it as well.
 
AquaSD

Erin1971Texas

Just another girl who likes fish
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
View Badges
Joined
May 14, 2019
Messages
2,327
Reaction score
2,480
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
Location
Spring, Texas
It was a split from an anemone at an LFS. They have a few that regularly split in a tank in their shop and they sell the babies

I have seen only a couple messages floating around that smaller nems are a little more finicky, and wondering if that contributed to it as well.
Certainly could be. Sometimes critters die despite our best efforts.
 

Rtaylor

Valuable Member
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
View Badges
Joined
Jan 6, 2021
Messages
1,066
Reaction score
1,168
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
Location
USA
I’ve found bubbletip anemones prefer some nitrates and phosphates. No need to direct feed them unless it is bleached. Hard to say what happened for sure. If your nutrients are really less than 1 nitrate and less than .05 phosphates your water may be too clean.
 

aggrofish

Active Member
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
View Badges
Joined
Oct 7, 2020
Messages
393
Reaction score
310
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
Location
las vegas, NV
Every tank and nem is different but currently my nem does way better with more nutrients. it‘ll catch frozen I feed the fish, but I feed pieces of raw shrimp from the grocery store About once a week. Seems to plump up after being fed.

I didn’t see you mention lighting but you did mention montipora. I think lighting is really important. I’ve grown montipora with garbage lights (orbit marine) and my nems didn’t do that well.
 
Tidal Gardens

Duncan62

Valuable Member
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
View Badges
Joined
Oct 4, 2021
Messages
1,301
Reaction score
1,094
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
Location
Kannapolis
Hm what do you think it was? The powder, AB+? At what point would you have changed the regimen, and what would you have cut back on (e.g. cut back on powder or eliminate it entirely)?
Feeding way to often. Never feed it everyday. It's photosynthetic. Maybe once a week. All mine in display tanks catch left overs floating around. That's all they get most of the time and all are healthy. Powder foods are not for BTA. I actually think they are best for increasing phosphate when it gets low. Lol
 
OP
shootingstar_reef

shootingstar_reef

Active Member
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
View Badges
Joined
Dec 27, 2020
Messages
143
Reaction score
166
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
Location
Los Angeles (SFV)
Feeding way to often. Never feed it everyday. It's photosynthetic. Maybe once a week. All mine in display tanks catch left overs floating around. That's all they get most of the time and all are healthy. Powder foods are not for BTA. I actually think they are best for increasing phosphate when it gets low. Lol
I think you may have misunderstood - I was not feeding my anemone everyday, I was feeding my tank. After the first initial negative impressions to direct feeding, I stopped and my nem was not directly fed until shortly after it passed.
 

Duncan62

Valuable Member
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
View Badges
Joined
Oct 4, 2021
Messages
1,301
Reaction score
1,094
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
Location
Kannapolis
I think you may have misunderstood - I was not feeding my anemone everyday, I was feeding my tank. After the first initial negative impressions to direct feeding, I stopped and my nem was not directly fed until shortly after it passed.
Ohhh. It made me think you were feeding it daily. Lol sorry for misinterpreting. Sorry for your loss.
 
Coral Mania

How many different food items do you feed your fish?

  • Only one food

    Votes: 6 5.8%
  • 2 Foods

    Votes: 13 12.6%
  • 3 Foods

    Votes: 23 22.3%
  • 4 Foods

    Votes: 14 13.6%
  • 5+ Different Foods

    Votes: 29 28.2%
  • 10+ Different Foods

    Votes: 18 17.5%
RED SEA
Top