Difficult and Special Care Species List

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NashobaTek

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It was just a general warning for anyone not familiar with various butterflies and how many specialist feeders there are within the genus that won't survive well in captivity. Angelfish I feel there aren't so many hurdles and problematic fish, but definitely a family worth researching each species well before purchasing more so than many other fish.

The original sentiment behind this list was to prevent unnecessary death, not all deaths. Think of this list as mitigation for lessening the hobby's impact on the fish we love. Also keep in mind that this list was compiled a long long time ago, it was actually used in an article by a well known author around the year 2000. I've edited and modified it through the years as the hobby and out understanding of fish and corals has evolved, but it's probably overdue for some more refinement. For instance, Anampses wrasses still seem to struggle with collection stress and handling issues and have low survival rates, but if you get a good specimen in the right environment they're super hardy.

However, when this list was compiled those survival rates were dismal; 9 in 10 probably died before they even made it to a person's tank. Them being on the list now serves to just inform people that they're more sensitive and you better know what you're doing, or it probably won't go well.


Pinnatus batfish were on the list of dying just from being shipped, plus very little was known about how to care for them.
Big strides have been made in this hobby and now a lot more of the harder to keep fish are able to be kept or are making headway in captive breeding programs.
 
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Ike

Ike

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#MODS
@Ike
Read the sticky new information is out and something's have changed anyway to update this sticky.

While there are some refinements I can think of, everything listed here is still pretty relevant IMO. What "new information" do you feel refutes the list? Survival rates have gotten a little better with some of the fish, but that mostly applies to the the fish best left for experienced hobbyists, and I'd say the same still goes for an overwhelming number of fish listed there.
 

sfin52

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While there are some refinements I can think of, everything listed here is still pretty relevant IMO. What "new information" do you feel refutes the list? Survival rates have gotten a little better with some of the fish, but that mostly applies to the the fish best left for experienced hobbyists, and I'd say the same still goes for an overwhelming number of fish listed there.
I was trying to ask more of a question. I'm sorry made it more of a statement.
 
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Ike

Ike

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I was trying to ask more of a question. I'm sorry made it more of a statement.

I'd say there are some that I'll edit at some point, but overwhelmingly, things haven't changed much. Some of the fish on the fish to avoid list have had some mild success stories. However, I feel pretty confident mortality rates on all of them are still quite high, and success often depends on either someone dedicated to keeping that fish alive and with the knowledge on how to do so, or some blind luck. Also, keep in mind that this list was intended for the beginner to intermediate hobbyist, most "advanced" guys either get off on trying to keep some of these incredibly difficult things alive, or already know to avoid them.
 
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sfin52

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I'd say there are some that I'll edit at some point, but overwhelmingly, things haven't changed much. Some of the fish on the fish to avoid list have had some mild success stories. However, I feel pretty confident mortality rates on all of them are still quite high, and success often depends on either someone dedicated to keeping that fish alive and with the knowledge on how to do so, and this list isn't for that hobbyist.
I understand. Thank you for the list and maintaining the list.
 
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Ike

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I understand. Thank you for the list and maintaining the list.

You're welcome, I'd like to think it has increased awareness and saved some fish over the 20 years when it was first posted online. When it first went up on RC I had a handful of LFS owners and employees contact me to let me know they changed their buying habits and won't buy certain fish anymore, and/or printed the list for customers to see in their stores.
 

jaxteller007

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Our CBB has went from everything being fine since we got it a little over 3 weeks ago to last night and today, laying on it's side a lot, not moving much, just in general looking like it's struggling really badly. Water parameters haven't changed. A good friend said in his experience it's like it has just decided that it does not like any of the food being offered. I easily caught it today and put it in an acclimation box where lots of various pieces of food will easily drift in and it won't have any competition for it. Also dimmed the lights to calm everyone else down. I think our tank may just be too aggressive when it comes to feeding time. The CBB doesn't show any damage from anyone messing with it, just all the other guys are really high energy eaters.

Only other thing I could think is the temp in the tank has spiked to almost 80 from the normal 76-77. Our hole house is running hot these days cause our HVAC system sucks and the rental company won't do much about it. I'm trying to bring the temp down in the tank but not sure if that's what would cause the behavior or not.
 

Amit Singh

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Is there an article for large active colorful fishes for large (around 220G) FOWLR semi-aggressive?

I see lot of don'ts - I am looking for
1. What large Angelfishes can be co-housed
2. What Triggers are ok
3. What tangs are ok?

I personally have following large ones in 220G DT 8' long FOWLR with 60G SUMP and they are ALL SUPER FINE - in saltwater individual fishes differ a LOT - my Picasso, lemon peel, blueface are living examples - never bother anyone else ...

1. Green bird wrasse
2. Red corris Wrasse
3. Harlequin Tusk
4. Blueface Anglefish
5. Lemonpeel dwarf angelfish
6. Picasso Triggerfish
7. Hippo Tang
8. Dimond Gobi
9. Ocelarris pair (male wyoming white and female mis-bar domino)
11. Saddleback angelfish (seen 4 ich and fluke outbreak with no issues)
12. Pinkface Wrasse
13. Bicolor Goatfish - love it ... can keep a few ... somehow only eats frozen food and does not grow at all

Was thinking of adding - ANY FEEDBACK FROM ANYONE WHO HAS HAD? HAS THESE?
14. Two Bicolor goatfish
16. Large Juvi Asfur or Maculosus - any thoughts which one is more colorful, less-aggressive and not shy?
18. Large Juvi Annularis
19. Yellow or White Tail Bristletooth Tang - which is hardier and look bright (in black tank backgound)
20. Garibaldi Damsel
 

sfin52

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Is there an article for large active colorful fishes for large (around 220G) FOWLR semi-aggressive?

I see lot of don'ts - I am looking for
1. What large Angelfishes can be co-housed
2. What Triggers are ok
3. What tangs are ok?

I personally have following large ones in 220G DT 8' long FOWLR with 60G SUMP and they are ALL SUPER FINE - in saltwater individual fishes differ a LOT - my Picasso, lemon peel, blueface are living examples - never bother anyone else ...

1. Green bird wrasse
2. Red corris Wrasse
3. Harlequin Tusk
4. Blueface Anglefish
5. Lemonpeel dwarf angelfish
6. Picasso Triggerfish
7. Hippo Tang
8. Dimond Gobi
9. Ocelarris pair (male wyoming white and female mis-bar domino)
11. Saddleback angelfish (seen 4 ich and fluke outbreak with no issues)
12. Pinkface Wrasse
13. Bicolor Goatfish - love it ... can keep a few ... somehow only eats frozen food and does not grow at all

Was thinking of adding - ANY FEEDBACK FROM ANYONE WHO HAS HAD? HAS THESE?
14. Two Bicolor goatfish
16. Large Juvi Asfur or Maculosus - any thoughts which one is more colorful, less-aggressive and not shy?
18. Large Juvi Annularis
19. Yellow or White Tail Bristletooth Tang - which is hardier and look bright (in black tank backgound)
20. Garibaldi Damsel
If you start a thread you will prob get more
images (3).jpeg
on the subject
 
Fritz

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While there are some refinements I can think of, everything listed here is still pretty relevant IMO. What "new information" do you feel refutes the list? Survival rates have gotten a little better with some of the fish, but that mostly applies to the the fish best left for experienced hobbyists, and I'd say the same still goes for an overwhelming number of fish listed there.
captive bred specimens. captive bred cleaner wrasse and dragonets are hardy af. tilefish are hardy because of new technology to help with decompression, fairys and flasher wrasse are very easy IME
 

Leo_ian

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Is there an article for large active colorful fishes for large (around 220G) FOWLR semi-aggressive?

I see lot of don'ts - I am looking for
1. What large Angelfishes can be co-housed
2. What Triggers are ok
3. What tangs are ok?

I personally have following large ones in 220G DT 8' long FOWLR with 60G SUMP and they are ALL SUPER FINE - in saltwater individual fishes differ a LOT - my Picasso, lemon peel, blueface are living examples - never bother anyone else ...

1. Green bird wrasse
2. Red corris Wrasse
3. Harlequin Tusk
4. Blueface Anglefish
5. Lemonpeel dwarf angelfish
6. Picasso Triggerfish
7. Hippo Tang
8. Dimond Gobi
9. Ocelarris pair (male wyoming white and female mis-bar domino)
11. Saddleback angelfish (seen 4 ich and fluke outbreak with no issues)
12. Pinkface Wrasse
13. Bicolor Goatfish - love it ... can keep a few ... somehow only eats frozen food and does not grow at all

Was thinking of adding - ANY FEEDBACK FROM ANYONE WHO HAS HAD? HAS THESE?
14. Two Bicolor goatfish
16. Large Juvi Asfur or Maculosus - any thoughts which one is more colorful, less-aggressive and not shy?
18. Large Juvi Annularis
19. Yellow or White Tail Bristletooth Tang - which is hardier and look bright (in black tank backgound)
20. Garibaldi Damsel
large angelfish that can be co-housed (interspecies?) if you are asking for interspecies, swallowtails can be mixed, but I don't think that counts
triggerfish that are peaceful include: blue throats, crosshatch, linespots and pink tails. blacks are a hit and miss, same goes for redtooths
tangs: bristle tooth tangs very useful, do rabbitfish count?, the indian ocean sailfin are cool, mimic tangs are peaceful enough, vlamangari are quite peaceful from what I hear, I think you can do a naso tang
 
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Woodchip

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Anyone know how to train a fish to eat frozen food. I have a Hectors goby and I know it eats sugar and I have seen it eat miniature pieces of brine shrimp do I think it is eating fine. But I just want to make sure.
 
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