Freshwater zebra danios for saltwater reef tank

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canadianeh

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I have been looking for schooling fish for my 3ft reef tank, and saltwater options either too big or too expensive as I want to get 10 of them.

Many knows that mollies can be converted to saltwater by slowly acclimating them. Other fish such as zebra danios who grow to maximum of 2" are considered brackish to freshwater fish, and are schooling fish.

Has anyone successfully converted zebra danios to saltwater?
 
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PBnJOnWheat

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I have been looking for schooling fish for my 3ft reef tank, and saltwater options either too big or too expensive as I want to get 10 of them.

Many knows that mollies can be converted to saltwater by slowly acclimating them. Other fish such as zebra danios who grow to maximum of 2" are considered brackish to freshwater fish, and are schooling fish.

Has anyone successfully converted zebra danios to saltwater?
I haven’t but fish can be pretty hardy. But the higher the salinity compared to what they are used to will cause them to have a harder time staying alive. Schooling typically occurs due to stress and fear. A defensive tactic. I’m not a freshwater specialist at all. But from this I’d say it’s possible but would take quite some time of slow increases.
 
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canadianeh

canadianeh

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I haven’t but fish can be pretty hardy. But the higher the salinity compared to what they are used to will cause them to have a harder time staying alive. Schooling typically occurs due to stress and fear. A defensive tactic. I’m not a freshwater specialist at all. But from this I’d say it’s possible but would take quite some time of slow increases.
ok. I will try to acclimate them at least for an hour and will report back here. Good thing that they are cheap.
 
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canadianeh

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Slow means days to weeks, not an hour. Don't look at a live animal in terms of $ cost and determine your level of care for their life and well being based on that.
An hour?

It will take several days to acclimate them to salt. Not even sure it's possible with that species?

Sorry for the misunderstanding. I didn't mean to downplay it due to the cost. I was talking about the risk if things go down south. I saw videos on youtube and they acclimated freshwater fish for an hour by slowly drip acclimate them. Of course, longer is better.

Some articles suggest that danios are one of species that lives in brackish water.
 

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You mentioned that it was a reef tank. If you're supporting reef flora and fauna, then you absolutely can not support danios in the tank.

When it says that they can tolerate brackish water, it's only the slightest amount of salt. And it's not their environment even in that case. They'd be in stress all the time. And that's at 1.005 or less.

The salinity of a reef tank would just be a horrible way for them to die.
 
Fritz

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I have been looking for schooling fish for my 3ft reef tank, and saltwater options either too big or too expensive as I want to get 10 of them.

Many knows that mollies can be converted to saltwater by slowly acclimating them. Other fish such as zebra danios who grow to maximum of 2" are considered brackish to freshwater fish, and are schooling fish.

Has anyone successfully converted zebra danios to saltwater?

I don't want to push unsolicited advice, but if you're interested here is my understanding of why any given fish cannot survive fresh and marine conditions.

As most people have mentioned, it's very difficult for a fish to survive being in full saltwater and full freshwater. There is completely different processes the fish has to use to survive.

In full freshwater the fish more salty than the water. Osmosis causes the fish to absorb water from the environment around them. To compensate they have to extret, pee, the excess water to maintain a proper internal chemistry.

In a marine environment the water is more salty than the fish. Now the osmosis is working the other way, the seawater is absorbing freshwater from the fish. To compensate they have to drink the seawater and their kidneys filter the excess salt.

Even with a fish that can survive both environments it can be very difficult for the fish to adjust.

Not one to critique a problem without a solution, I do have some a few more options. Mollies as you mentioned. Guppies can also be converted to saltwater. Some of the Pseudomugil species such as, cyanodorsalis or signifer, are documented to be found in full marine environments.
 
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canadianeh

canadianeh

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I don't want to push unsolicited advice, but if you're interested here is my understanding of why any given fish cannot survive fresh and marine conditions.

As most people have mentioned, it's very difficult for a fish to survive being in full saltwater and full freshwater. There is completely different processes the fish has to use to survive.

In full freshwater the fish more salty than the water. Osmosis causes the fish to absorb water from the environment around them. To compensate they have to extret, pee, the excess water to maintain a proper internal chemistry.

In a marine environment the water is more salty than the fish. Now the osmosis is working the other way, the seawater is absorbing freshwater from the fish. To compensate they have to drink the seawater and their kidneys filter the excess salt.

Even with a fish that can survive both environments it can be very difficult for the fish to adjust.

Not one to critique a problem without a solution, I do have some a few more options. Mollies as you mentioned. Guppies can also be converted to saltwater. Some of the Pseudomugil species such as, cyanodorsalis or signifer, are documented to be found in full marine environments.
Thanks I will look into this. Appreciate it.
 
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Some fish can be converted but it's really not advised if you watch all the updates on the fish inappropriate reefer said all ut one went missing which can be determined that they all died and were scavenged. Also thread fins a tiny for a reef and would t so good with the copious amount of flow in a reef.
 

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Even if they could be in full salt ...the flow in a reef tank would surely stress and kill them.

Stinging corals would kill them.

Other fish would kill them.

Some Inverts would kill them.

By the time you removed everything that poses a danger to them...it wouldn't be a reef anymore.
 
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Joshcom

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Some fish can be converted but it's really not advised if you watch all the updates on the fish inappropriate reefer said all ut one went missing which can be determined that they all died and were scavenged. Also thread fins a tiny for a reef and would t so good with the copious amount of flow in a reef.
Sorry mixed up thread fins and blue backs
 
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