Getting Started

Discussion in 'Hudson Valley Reef Keepers' started by Matthew segnit, Mar 17, 2018.

  1. Matthew segnit

    Matthew segnit Member

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    Hey guys Matt here,
    My uncle and former member, Richard Durso sent me here to make connections in the Hudson Valley and to help me get started with reef keeping. Currently I don't have a tank or any equipment for that matter, and I'm seeing if anyone locally had some gear for sale to get me going. Any advice or help is greatly appreciated in advance. I know nano is not always what everyone recommends to start but thats the way I'm leaning.

    Thanks again,
    Matt Segnit
     
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  2. mets17127

    mets17127 Member

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    I’ve got a few seaclone skimmers laying around...everyone started with those!
     
  3. sponge

    sponge Member Hudson Valley Reef Keepers

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    I have several tanks of various sizes .Some reef ready ,some that are not .

    What are you looking to do ?
     
  4. Matthew segnit

    Matthew segnit Member

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    Mainly looking to get started. I want focus on corals first and just dial in my water chemistry and just overall get myself into the hobby. something reef ready would be perfect. Also any advice on how to get started is really appreciated!
     
  5. sponge

    sponge Member Hudson Valley Reef Keepers

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    Water Water Water ! The first purchase should be a RO/DI filtering system for your water needs .Having the ability to make your water when you need it is a huge plus . Buying water can be a bit more expensive ,especially if you plan on staying in the hobby

    Things to consider . Do you want to go with a sand bed or do you want to go bare bottom ? What type of lighting do want ,t5 or Led ;or a combination of the two ? You will need heaters to control tank temperature,and one for water changes .Also need a few pumps to move water ,and one to mix you water change .Then maybe some live rock , to help seed the tank with life .

    I run a few tanks that are not reef ready . I use a HOB refugium on them .The smallest size tank I have is a 2x2 cube that's reef ready up to a 220.

    I think the most important thing to have is patience and let you tank cycle . Nothing GOOD happens fast in this hobby !
     
  6. Matthew segnit

    Matthew segnit Member

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    Looking for between a 20-40 gallon system. Sand bottom along with rock with LED lighting. Preferably some type of HOB filtration.
     
  7. mets17127

    mets17127 Member

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    I had an overflow box and sump on my old 90. I flood proofed it with a float switch, siphon break, etc.
    Be warned that for every way a smaller system is easier, there is a reason it is harder. You don’t need a skimmer, water changes are cheaper and easier, lighting is easier, etc.. the downsize is less inhabitants, harder to keep numbers stable, salinity swings without ATO are drastic.
     
  8. rhdoug

    rhdoug Member Hudson Valley Reef Keepers

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    I ran a bare bones 10 gallon tank for over 10 years with some soft coral, a snail or 2, a hermit crab, and one clownfish. Maxspect Razor LED nano light, HOB filtration (which had no media in it other than some dead coral pieces) and a Ecotech mp10 for more water movement. I didn't have an Auto Top-Off (ATO) which was the biggest drawback as was mentioned by mets. You have to be very concious and remember to do it every day. Weekly water changes of a gallon or 2 was just about the only maintenance involved. And I would consider the RO/DI water filtration unit a must, sponge is right.

    I actually bought a standpipe from your uncle when he lived in the area. Does he still reef? He had a great tank that he showed me when I picked up the standpipe.
     
  9. Matthew segnit

    Matthew segnit Member

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    He's been more or less " out of reefing " since they moved. I'm trying to get him back into it as well as getting my self into it. Thanks for the advice!
     
  10. mets17127

    mets17127 Member

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    He’s THAT Durso?!?!
     
  11. Matthew segnit

    Matthew segnit Member

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    Yep Richard Durso (Durso standpipes) that would be my uncle.
     
  12. mets17127

    mets17127 Member

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    Don’t you have to have a sump then...like, by law?
     
  13. dutch27

    dutch27 Active Member Hudson Valley Reef Keepers

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    In the 20-40g range, depending on your budget, you may want to consider an "all in one" type of tank where they have a false wall to hide basic equipment. Getting an auto top-off on those can be tricky though. I would also try to keep the tank size down to something where you can easily do 10%-20% water changes. If mixing and changing 8g-10g of water isn't going to be simple, you won't do it.
     

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