How do I make a modern looking stand?

Discussion in 'Do It Yourself (DIY)' started by ScottsTot, Mar 7, 2018.

  1. ScottsTot

    ScottsTot Member

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2018
    Messages:
    72
    Likes Received:
    27
    I am a newbie (no saltwater setup yet) in the research phase. I am tempted to purchase the Red Sea Reefer 170 or 250. The 170 would consume my budget and the 250 is over my budget but I can’t get over the beauty and quality of these tanks!


    If I go with a IM Nuvo (or another sleek tank) and am able to pull off a nice looking stand, I can save about $1000 in total costs. Plus, the lack of space for an ATO container in the 170 (a pricey but reasonable option) is a downer.


    I built 2 stands for my freshwater setups in the past and they actually came out okay….if you stand far. I don’t like how things don’t line up and you can see the end grains of the plywood. Looks amateurish. Attached some pictures. Excuse the mess. Spring cleaning coming soon :). You can see how things don't line up.


    Can you help me learn what would be required to make a stand that looks like a Red Sea Reefer stand (or close to it). I’m looking to make the stand flush with the display and look minimalistic and modern. If it’s economical and possible for a newbie, I may give it a try.





    Tools I currently own:

    Miter saw, level, right angle square, Kreg pocket hole jig, measuring tape




    1. Is building my stand worth the extra cost and time? I suspect building a stand will cost $200 to $300 depending on if I need new tools.
    2. How do you make the end grains of the plywood invisible?
    3. Do I need to use 2x4s for the frame? I will most likely go with a 40 gallon display.
    4. If I do not use 2x4s and use only 3/4 inch plywood, is a back necessary? I would have a top, bottom, and sides. The front will be only doors.
    5. Is a circular saw the best tool for ripping plywood and cutting holes in plywood?
    6. Is a slight overhand of the display tank safe?
    7. How do you achieve the gloss look Red Sea stands give? Vinyl, a special paint or stain, formica? The stand would also have to be waterproof.
    8. If your tank has rims, how do you make the rims not so obvious. I’m considering a 40 breeder and the rims are a turn off for me.
    9. Any other tips for a modern or contemporary looking stand?
     
    jsker likes this.
    Tags:

  2. ScottsTot

    ScottsTot Member

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2018
    Messages:
    72
    Likes Received:
    27
    IMG-1367.JPG IMG-1368.JPG IMG-1369.JPG IMG-1370.JPG IMG-1371.JPG IMG-1372.JPG
     
    jsker likes this.
  3. Airwarf

    Airwarf Member

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2017
    Messages:
    43
    Likes Received:
    23
    Stand-ception was so 2010 bro. OP asked for modern!!! ok, jk, I do like your setup.



    To answer OP's questions about creating a stand close to the quality of RedSea...

    You're going to need a lot of tools that you probably don't have. I'm basing this comment solely off the fact that you asked, "Is a circular saw the correct tool for ripping plywood and holes and stuff." The answer is no. Unless you want to seriously get into woodworking, please stop here.

    The extra cost for you is going to be worth it in quality.
     
  4. taxiem

    taxiem Active Member

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2018
    Messages:
    133
    Likes Received:
    106
    If you are going to make your own stand, I would use a planed block for the inside "frame" as such and then cut MDF in complete pieces for the outside and simply have it wrapped in vinyl or wrap it yourself.

    I have done this for many fish tanks and also built media units, TV cabinets and such to match.

    Wil see cna I get my Facebook pics saved and put them on here.

    One stand I actually used a load of old really cheap doors that were in the loft space when we moved in and just used a polyfiller to smooth all the joins then vinyl wrapped xx
     
  5. taxiem

    taxiem Active Member

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2018
    Messages:
    133
    Likes Received:
    106
    First pic is before the wrap :D Not super professional but for a couple old doors and a rol of cheap vinyl, didn't turn out too bad xx

    10306227_10152742183370954_8748090676740936279_n.png

    10410369_10152750260240954_8144792699539177038_n.png

    10614176_10152750266590954_7706591444013840074_n.png

    10959471_10152740641765954_6562322856724278249_n.png

    10995803_10152742183600954_5094444657786882939_n.png

    11021081_10152742183460954_7622953786660262264_n.png

    11033448_10152750260090954_8552049543740626237_n.png
     
  6. blackizzz

    blackizzz Member Build Thread Contributor

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2010
    Messages:
    72
    Likes Received:
    58
    Location:
    Sweden
    I built my own stand using painted MDF. No extra bracing on the inside. (For a tank around 40g)
    The stand is solid enough using only MDF, I designed it from the Elos stand series (which is unsupported)

    If I were to do it again, I'd change a few things just to get the extra "finish" I believe you're looking for:
    I'd use pre-made doors (like from IKEA or another "cheap" place with kitchen interior) alt. made doors using solid wood (MDF isn't even enough for doors IMO)
    I'd paint it a few more times using a glossier paint.
    Before painting I'd use something to cover up the ends on the sides, like self-stick thin wood. (don't know what to call 'em)

    I did use a back, I don't think I'd trust the MDF's side to side stability with only sides, bottom and top. I also have two 5" supports in the front for additional stability. (like the old Elos stands)
    Kind of like this: [​IMG]
     
  7. F291

    F291 Active Member R2R Supporter Build Thread Contributor

    Joined:
    May 16, 2016
    Messages:
    273
    Likes Received:
    260
    Location:
    West Covina, CA
    I would advise if you are heading down the diy route to use 2x4. Build a frame with the 2x4, then get plywood for the wrap to get that 'modern' look you want. There are tons of guide on how to build a frame.
     
  8. George Lopez

    George Lopez Active Member Build Thread Contributor

    Joined:
    May 6, 2017
    Messages:
    394
    Likes Received:
    184
    To avoid seams at the front of my stand I used a single piece of plywood with the center cut out, but I was staining not painting and i reused it as a pop out door (not a modern style) You can always use wood filter and sand when dry to get your smooth finish for your paint and get a finished plywood so you don't have to worry about the knots. As for hiding the frame of a tank I just made the facia of the stand taller to cover it so the tank sits inside the stand hiding the nasty black plastic, you can use your doors to cover the font for this and just raise the sides. For hiding the edges of the plywood they sell rolls of veneer (usually used when staining) or you can use wood filler then sand to smooth as you would the seams if your not staining it. Oh yea and try to get adjustable hinges so you can get the doors to line up perfectly.
     
  9. mstockmaster

    mstockmaster Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2017
    Messages:
    266
    Likes Received:
    194
    Location:
    Columbus Ohio
    Easiest way to avoid plywood end grain is to avoid plywood. Simple as that. Instead of plywood maybe try using joinery to create panels. You can easily do that with a kreg jig. You'll want a table saw though. [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]
     
    jsker, cracker, lbacha and 1 other person like this.
  10. graffitireef

    graffitireef Active Member

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2018
    Messages:
    108
    Likes Received:
    68
    You have a few options here to make your stands look really professional.
    A.
    1. Cover your seams and spots where your nails are showing with joint compound and then lightly sand once its hard.
    2. Primer! I'm shocked at how many people do not prime their wood. Use a good quality primer thats durable and stands up to water. I would recommend automotive primer. Spray a coat on. Lightly sand with a high grit like 220 and then apply another coat.
    3. Apply a good quality latex paint with a roller. I would advise using flat paint and then spraying a couple coats of water based poly.
    B. Find a local welder and have him build a stand using 2 x 2 box steel. You will need to clean the steel once finished using something like mineral spirits and then coat it. Im currently building a large acrylic tank and will going this route and coating it in spray on truck bed liner. After which I will cover it in finished hardwood panels.
     
  11. ScottsTot

    ScottsTot Member

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2018
    Messages:
    72
    Likes Received:
    27
    So my options are:

    1. Spend the money and just buy a beautiful stand (tempting but trying to run the other way)
    2. Build my own stand but the stand won't look as nice (which I am okay with as long as the stand does not look tacky)
    3. It seems veneers, vinyl, and wood filler are some good options for hiding the joints or end grains. I'm considering vinyl wrap since it seems the easiest. If I can get a nice white tone I like, I can just wrap the plywood after putting it together. That would take are of hiding the joints/end grains. But, how good is vinyl for a saltwater tank? Will it hold up well to salt and water?
     
  12. graffitireef

    graffitireef Active Member

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2018
    Messages:
    108
    Likes Received:
    68
    Really depends on prep and the adhesive you're using. Prep is 75% of the battle. I've dealt with vinyl wraps but not on a salt water tank. I would be interested in seeing the results.
     
  13. lbacha

    lbacha Well-Known Member Build Thread Contributor

    Joined:
    Nov 16, 2017
    Messages:
    774
    Likes Received:
    573
    [​IMG]

    Not the best pictures but I built both of these stands out of edge joined Aspen. Lots of sanding and coats of polyurethane were needed to get a professional and waterproof finish
     
    Naoxyn and jsker like this.
  14. mstockmaster

    mstockmaster Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2017
    Messages:
    266
    Likes Received:
    194
    Location:
    Columbus Ohio
    You could always take the easy way if you're getting something small and just go buy something from Ikea. That would likely hit all of your requirements. I use an Ikea cabinet to hold my dosing setup and ato reservoir. [​IMG]
     
    jsker likes this.
  15. mrpizzaface

    mrpizzaface Active Member R2R Supporter

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2017
    Messages:
    235
    Likes Received:
    205
    Location:
    Queens
    If I were going to try to make a modern stand with limited tools...

    1. I would use mdf with a caveat. I would out where cabinet shops in my area ordered sheet goods from. I would call that place and order MR fiber. It is basically an oil impregnated MDF that is moisture resistant. Should be around $.80 a square foot. (if i couldn't find it I would use regular mdf. I would not use ultralight mdf)

    2. Cut all your pieces with circular saw with at least a 60 tooth blade. You should create a straight edge with a level(or straight lumber) and two clamps that you can run your saw against to make sure the cuts are straight.

    3. Once you have your pieces cut, use a flat block with 150 sand paper to remove the saw marks from the edges of the plywood, being careful not to round the corners.

    4. Paint all the edges of the mdf with mixture of water and wood glue. Sand again. This will seal your edges.

    5. Assemble you cabinet using a kreg jig, with all holes and fasteners on the inside. (you could screw through the cabinet from the outside, you would need to fill and sand any holes. These will shadow through the finish a bit.

    6. Break all the edges. Lightly with a block and sand paper at a 45 degree angle.

    7. use auto primer to spray cabinet. light coats, then sand.

    8. Use any sheen spray paint to paint the rest of the cabinet. Thin coats prob three layer sand after 1st tow layer.

    9. Use European hinges Blum, salice, grass et cetera.

    10. Use cabinet levelers with t nuts on the bottom of the cabinet.

    11. drill out for hardware before paint, and test fit door.

    If you need I could send you a basic drawing of the assembly. You can totally do this.
     
  16. cilyjr

    cilyjr Active Member R2R Supporter Reef Tank 365 Build Thread Contributor

    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2011
    Messages:
    499
    Likes Received:
    402
    Location:
    Rhode Island
    Mrpizzaface gives some great advice here. However from the title of the OPs post I'd guess he's a beginner to lower intermediate woodworker. There's nothing wrong with that and he could absoutely build the stand he wants given some time but as a novice you will make some mistakes and it will drive the price up. Maybe significantly.

    My point is that for a beginner on a budget, it may not be cost effective to build on your own, but if you don't mind spending a little extra for
    A. The tools you need
    B. The extra material
    than building on your own will be an invaluable experience. Nothing teaches in woodworking like making a bad compound miter cut on a $50 piece of cherry!
     
    Karl M and mrpizzaface like this.
  17. Kyl

    Kyl Valuable Member Build Thread Contributor

    Joined:
    May 11, 2016
    Messages:
    1,017
    Likes Received:
    861
    Location:
    Vancouver, Canada
    If you don't want to build the whole thing and don't plan on running a sump, which means going with an IM fusion 10 - 30, you can use Ikea Sektion wall mount kitchen cabinets as stands. Just make sure they don't get wet for a prolong period of time (salt creep via lid clips).

    Here's what my 20 & 10 looked like when setup on them. I still have the tanks physically there and can get a better set of pictures if you're interested. Just did some reinforcing with L brackets, but the 20 in particular is super solid. They also perfectly match the dimensions of the tanks once you put a topper on. The nice thing is the front panels come in whatever style you want from Ikea so there are a lot of look options. A bonus is the Reliance 2.5g/5g AquaPak containers I use for ATO resivoirs fit in them perfectly.

    [​IMG]
    10vs20
    by Kyl, on Flickr

    [​IMG]
    sektion_stand
    by Kyl, on Flickr
     
    Last edited: Mar 8, 2018
    jsker and mrpizzaface like this.
  18. mrpizzaface

    mrpizzaface Active Member R2R Supporter

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2017
    Messages:
    235
    Likes Received:
    205
    Location:
    Queens
    that looks like a pretty great budget option! smart!
     
    jsker likes this.
  19. jsker

    jsker Reefing is all about the adventure Staff Member Team R2R R2R Supporter R2R Excellence Award Partner Member 2018 Article Contributor Build Thread Contributor

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2015
    Messages:
    17,262
    Likes Received:
    27,872
    Location:
    Central Florida
    This was the OP post;)
     
  20. jsker

    jsker Reefing is all about the adventure Staff Member Team R2R R2R Supporter R2R Excellence Award Partner Member 2018 Article Contributor Build Thread Contributor

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2015
    Messages:
    17,262
    Likes Received:
    27,872
    Location:
    Central Florida
    There are different way you could do this.
    • One make the 2x4 frame and use cabinet doors for the box stores and hinge the front doors.
    • there are some good example is work here on the post with skinning the frame.
    • You can use cabinet grade plywood and banding tape for your edges, and finish the box.
    • I would not suggest using MDF, Particle board just for water damage down the road .
    Look at the water box tanks, they are quite a bit less. Lay out your build costs and time. If this is a project that you would like to build and buy a couple of new tools go for it. Do not buy cheap tool either;)
     
Draft saved Draft deleted

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice
Loading...