New clown fish

alexburkett

New Member
View Badges
Joined
Apr 15, 2021
Messages
22
Reaction score
2
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
Location
ohio
Hello!
I am new to the saltwater community and after cycling my tank for about 2 months, testing salinity, and water testing I finally felt I was ready to purchase fish! I got 2 little clown fish and they seem to be doing good. It’s only my 2nd day having them and they haven’t eaten yet, but they do swim around and explore the aquarium. One thing that does concern me is they keep opening and closing their mouth (kinda like a goldfish). Is this normal? If not what should I do
 

vetteguy53081

Well known Member and monster tank lover
View Badges
Joined
Aug 11, 2013
Messages
48,785
Reaction score
110,729
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
Location
Wisconsin - Florida in several months
It’s not normal and may be something affecting their gills. Can you post a couple of pics under white lights to further see what may be apparent?
 

Azedenkae

Valuable Member
View Badges
Joined
Feb 26, 2021
Messages
2,083
Reaction score
1,957
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
Location
Chicago
Hello!
I am new to the saltwater community and after cycling my tank for about 2 months, testing salinity, and water testing I finally felt I was ready to purchase fish! I got 2 little clown fish and they seem to be doing good. It’s only my 2nd day having them and they haven’t eaten yet, but they do swim around and explore the aquarium. One thing that does concern me is they keep opening and closing their mouth (kinda like a goldfish). Is this normal? If not what should I do
Haven't eaten is quite normal, they may not be used to the food you are feeding them yet.

When they open and close their mouth, you mean like actually open big as if yawning? And how rapid?
 
Top Shelf Aquatics
OP
A

alexburkett

New Member
View Badges
Joined
Apr 15, 2021
Messages
22
Reaction score
2
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
Location
ohio

Attachments

  • 40AC9553-1A9F-47B9-8CA8-4248350C6A8A.png
    40AC9553-1A9F-47B9-8CA8-4248350C6A8A.png
    627.6 KB · Views: 22

vetteguy53081

Well known Member and monster tank lover
View Badges
Joined
Aug 11, 2013
Messages
48,785
Reaction score
110,729
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
Location
Wisconsin - Florida in several months
Without pics to confirm anything, I can say many fish yawn especially wrasses. Fish yawn just to stretch their mouths. You see this pretty frequently with predators. Their jaws are the most important part of their anatomy so they need to keep them in good condition.
If they’re yawning every few minutes or so, this may indicate a dissolved oxygen or temperature problem. Only other would be flukes. Easy way to test is to place them in a CLEAN container of freshwater with A pinch of baking soda for 4-5 minutes the same temperature as the display tank and then return them to the aquarium
Loom on bottom of container with flashlight and see if you notice what looks like sesame seeds or fish scales. If so - Flukes
If not, may be behavioral
 

vetteguy53081

Well known Member and monster tank lover
View Badges
Joined
Aug 11, 2013
Messages
48,785
Reaction score
110,729
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
Location
Wisconsin - Florida in several months
Great pic
Hmmm... looks what looks like mucus around their gills and could be brooklynella and explain the behavior.
 
Fritz

vetteguy53081

Well known Member and monster tank lover
View Badges
Joined
Aug 11, 2013
Messages
48,785
Reaction score
110,729
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
Location
Wisconsin - Florida in several months
How do I fix this
Assuming it’s brook, tYpically a standard formalin solution is mixed with either fresh or saltwater in a separate treatment container. Initially, all fish are given a quick dip in the formalin at a higher concentration, followed by continued treatment in a prolonged bath of formalin at a lower concentration in a quarantine tank (QT). Of course, the longer the fish are exposed to the formalin treatment, the more effective it will be at eliminating this disease. Quick cure is a source of formalin.
If a formalin solution is not available for immediate use, temporary relief may be provided by giving fish a FW dip or bath. Even though this treatment will not cure the disease, it can help to remove some of the parasites, as well as reduce the amount of mucus in the gills to assist with respiration problems
As far as any dots, brook is similar symptomatically to Ich, this is also a parasite that primarily attacks the gills first. At the onset, fish may scrape up against objects, rapid respiration develops, and fish often gasp for air at the surface as the gills become clogged with mucus. Very quickly the fish will become lethargic, refuse to eat, and its colors will fade. The most noticeable difference that sets Brooklynella apart from Oodinium/ich is the heavy amount of slime that is produced by a fish that has contracted this parasite. As the disease progresses, a thick whitish mucus covers the body. This will usually start at the head and spread outward across the entire body.
 
OP
A

alexburkett

New Member
View Badges
Joined
Apr 15, 2021
Messages
22
Reaction score
2
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
Location
ohio
Okay, so I managed to see the vid. To me it looks like the orange one has tiny dots starting to pop up on its side.

And yes, definitely very fast breathing. What's your ammonia reading like?
High range PH is 7.8
Nitrate is 0ppm but could be 5, more yellow than gold
Ammonia 0
Nitrite 0.25
 
Maxout
OP
A

alexburkett

New Member
View Badges
Joined
Apr 15, 2021
Messages
22
Reaction score
2
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
Location
ohio
Assuming it’s brook, tYpically a standard formalin solution is mixed with either fresh or saltwater in a separate treatment container. Initially, all fish are given a quick dip in the formalin at a higher concentration, followed by continued treatment in a prolonged bath of formalin at a lower concentration in a quarantine tank (QT). Of course, the longer the fish are exposed to the formalin treatment, the more effective it will be at eliminating this disease. Quick cure is a source of formalin.
If a formalin solution is not available for immediate use, temporary relief may be provided by giving fish a FW dip or bath. Even though this treatment will not cure the disease, it can help to remove some of the parasites, as well as reduce the amount of mucus in the gills to assist with respiration problems
As far as any dots, brook is similar symptomatically to Ich, this is also a parasite that primarily attacks the gills first. At the onset, fish may scrape up against objects, rapid respiration develops, and fish often gasp for air at the surface as the gills become clogged with mucus. Very quickly the fish will become lethargic, refuse to eat, and its colors will fade. The most noticeable difference that sets Brooklynella apart from Oodinium/ich is the heavy amount of slime that is produced by a fish that has contracted this parasite. As the disease progresses, a thick whitish mucus covers the body. This will usually start at the head and spread outward across the entire body.
I haven’t noticed any slime..yet lol
Would it be smart to buy ich medication while I wait for Parsi pro to come in the mail?
Also I’m unfamiliar with formalin
 

vetteguy53081

Well known Member and monster tank lover
View Badges
Joined
Aug 11, 2013
Messages
48,785
Reaction score
110,729
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
Location
Wisconsin - Florida in several months
A type of formalin would be quick cure. Copper won’t do much unless you truly have parasite issues which doesn’t appear as such
 
Click to watch best scape method in 5 easy steps!

Do you house a "Reef Safe" Angelfish in your reef tank?

  • YES and it's going good

    Votes: 204 41.2%
  • YES but it's not working out

    Votes: 13 2.6%
  • NO I have tried it in the past and it didn't work out

    Votes: 44 8.9%
  • NO I haven't tried yet

    Votes: 218 44.0%
  • Other (please explain)

    Votes: 16 3.2%
Cultivated Reef
Top