Pebble-Tooth Eels with Predators/Inverts?

ISpeakForTheSeas

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So, a bit of a hypothetical variation on a frequently asked question, but I'm wondering about potential long-term tank mates for eels.

Specifically, I'm wondering about potential predator and invert tank mates with pebble-tooth eels: lionfish, anglers, scorpionfish, walking batfish, flounders/soles, etc. (the camouflage/ambush fish) for the preds, and starfish, urchins, nems, cucumbers, snails/conches, sea slugs/sea hares, hermits (including both reef-safe and not-reef safe hermits), etc. for the inverts.*
*As a note here, I'm not looking to keep all of these in the same tank, I'm really just looking to see what someone could keep.

I know the general consensus with fish is that if it fits in the eel's mouth, it's a potential meal. So, I'm mainly wondering about sizes with the fish, as I'd assume it'll be at risk of being eaten if it is too small and at risk of eating the eel(s) if it's too big (at least while the eel is young). For example (assuming that it's fine if it's properly sized): would a dwarf lionfish work with a pebble-tooth eel? What about a volitan lion? Similarly, would a wartskin angler work? How about a giant angler? That sort of thing.

Regarding the inverts, I'm not really sure on inverts other than shrimp and crabs with these eels, so any guidance there is appreciated.
 

lion king

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Pebble tooth eels are generally safe with most fish as long they are acclimated to a dead diet feeding routine, are sized appropriately, and kept in the proper sized tank. Most of the stories of pebble tooths eating fish likely fall out of those parameters. A large eel directly out of the ocean, still wild and put into a tank with small fish. Raising a smaller eel will always be best, and if acclimated and properly sized can live with lions. I wouldn't recommend a warty, while a giant angler may be possible, feeding anglers in community tanks are a big challenge. and many fail. The eel won't be eaten but crabs and shrimp will be on the menu, the other inverts are fine.
 
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ISpeakForTheSeas

ISpeakForTheSeas

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Pebble tooth eels are generally safe with most fish as long they are acclimated to a dead diet feeding routine, are sized appropriately, and kept in the proper sized tank. Most of the stories of pebble tooths eating fish likely fall out of those parameters. A large eel directly out of the ocean, still wild and put into a tank with small fish. Raising a smaller eel will always be best, and if acclimated and properly sized can live with lions. I wouldn't recommend a warty, while a giant angler may be possible, feeding anglers in community tanks are a big challenge. and many fail. The eel won't be eaten but crabs and shrimp will be on the menu, the other inverts are fine.
Great feedback, thank you! Would the eels still be safe for the fish if I did live feeding for the whole tank?
 
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lion king

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Great feedback, thank you! Would the eels still be safe for the fish if I did live feeding for the whole tank?

As long as the fish are too large for them to get down their throat. Here's how you spot internet folklore, when someone says their snowflake ate a 5"trigger, laughable. Pebble tooth eels have rows of blunt teeth for crushing shells and such from crustaceans, they can not grab a fish with their teeth and wrestle them down. Any fish must be swallow size. It's most important to break them of their wild streak when 1st acquired, as long as you are not risking them with really small fish or you start with a really large eel, this will not be an issue. They will likely join in on eating the ghost shrimp that you feed, maybe a guppy but even less likely they will try and get a molly. You do have to take a bit more of hands on approach in feeding live to multiple predators. You must make sure everyone eats. I feed 5 predators live in a 90g, I use a feeding stick to herd mollies or ghosties and to block the fuzzy, which a royal piggie pita.
 
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ISpeakForTheSeas

ISpeakForTheSeas

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As long as the fish are too large for them to get down their throat. Here's how you spot internet folklore, when someone says their snowflake ate a 5"trigger, laughable. Pebble tooth eels have rows of blunt teeth for crushing shells and such from crustaceans, they can not grab a fish with their teeth and wrestle them down. Any fish must be swallow size. It's most important to break them of their wild streak when 1st acquired, as long as you are not risking them with really small fish or you start with a really large eel, this will not be an issue. They will likely join in on eating the ghost shrimp that you feed, maybe a guppy but even less likely they will try and get a molly. You do have to take a bit more of hands on approach in feeding live to multiple predators. You must make sure everyone eats. I feed 5 predators live in a 90g, I use a feeding stick to herd mollies or ghosties and to block the fuzzy, which a royal piggie pita.
Good to know - thank you again!
 

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