Raising the Komahara blenny

chad vossen

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Earlier this year I decided we would start raising fang blennies at our hatchery. They are inexpensive, peaceful, bold, and perfect for reef tanks. There are so many varieties of fang blennies, it's surprising that more breeders are not working with them. Out of three types of fang blennies we started with, our Komahara blennies were first to produce eggs. The eggs are deposited in PVC pipes, which are easily removed for hatching the larvae directly into larval tanks. Once hatched, the larvae can begin feeding on rotifers right away. Larval duration is about 25 days till settlement, which they'll quickly begin feeding on APbreed TDO pellets.

At about 15 days old, the larvae are quiet large and resemble tadpoles.

At about 25 days old, the blennies have settled into juveniles. At this stage, they are eating pellets and behaving like adults.

Perhaps one of the best videos I've taken of a baby fish, this Komahara blenny is making itself at home in the rasta zoas.

In conclusion, I would highly recommend adding fang blennies to any reef tank. Treat them like anthias, they do very well in groups. You can even keep multiple species together. Should they spawn in your tank, they are pretty easy to raise too.
 
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Maritimer

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... And I was so tempted by the trio of forktails at the LFS last time I was there . . .

Really terrific videos, Chad!

~Bruce
 

Haydn

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Do you have any longevity data for these fish, I ask because I understand they are cooler water blennies and wonder if, like the Blueheaded Jawfish, they don't adapt well to the higher temperatures most of us keep our reef tanks at. Although that may not be the case as they have spent all their lives at higher temperatures and may have adapted.

I sourced 5 tank bred specimens in December 2016 and echo your comments, they are indeed stunning fish, happily lived in a group, however 18 months later I have 3 left (I have been keeping fish long enough to know and accept fish die). The fish were all a similar size and I assume from the same hatching. I would very much like to add more to the group and if you have some data you are willing to share it would allow me to make a more informed choice.
 
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chad vossen

chad vossen

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I've found that if the ratio of fish is heavily male, they'll fight more and eventually some may die. I had a trio of males for 2 years before loosing one. Introduced a new komahara, which ended up being a female. The remaining 2 males did fine with the female in the tank, though if one was courting the female, the other was in hiding. Sold the female with one of the males. I still have one of my original males, which has been with me nearly 3 years now.

I've found this species to be very hardy, and tolerant of a wide range of temperatures.
 

Haydn

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Thank you very much for the reply. Are there any outward signs of sex, I can't see anything obvious on mine.
 

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